Oatmeal Brown Sugar Cookies with Raisins & Pecans

Tested & Perfected Recipes

These fabulous oatmeal cookies are slightly crispy on the outside and deliciously chewy on the inside.

oatmeal raisin cookies

I love to bake and especially love to find end all, be all recipes for classic American desserts. This variation on oatmeal raisin cookies is one of them (see also Secret Ingredient Chocolate Chip Cookies and Supernatural Brownies). You bakers out there know that it can take many attempts to get it just right, but once you find that perfect recipe, it’s your go-to forever.

As soon as I tasted these cookies out of the oven, I said, “That’s it! I’m done.” These are not your ordinary oatmeal cookies. The recipe calls for way fewer oats than most, which, strangely, makes for much better oatmeal cookies. The other big difference is that they are sweetened entirely with brown sugar, which gives them fabulous flavor and makes them slightly crispy on the outside and deliciously chewy on the inside. Be careful not to overcook these: oatmeal cookies get very crispy if baked too long and you’ll enjoy them so much more if they are slightly chewy.

What you’ll need to make Oatmeal Cookies with Raisins & Pecans

how to make oatmeal raisin cookies

How to make Oatmeal Cookies with Raisins & Pecans

To begin, combine the oats, flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl.

how to make oatmeal raisin cookies

Whisk well.

how to make oatmeal raisin cookies

In the bowl of an electric mixer, combine the butter and brown sugar.

how to make oatmeal raisin cookies

Beat on medium speed until creamy, about 3 minutes.

how to make oatmeal raisin cookies

Add the egg and vanilla.

how to make oatmeal raisin cookies

Beat until smooth, about 30 seconds.

how to make oatmeal raisin cookies

Add the flour/oatmeal mixture.

how to make oatmeal raisin cookies

Mix on low speed until just combined.

how to make oatmeal raisin cookies

Add the pecans and raisins.

how to make oatmeal raisin cookies

Mix until just combined.

how to make oatmeal raisin cookies

Drop the dough into 1-1/2-tablespoon mounds onto the prepared baking sheets.

how to make oatmeal raisin cookies

Bake until the edges are slightly golden but the centers are still pale, 11 to 13 minutes.

how to make oatmeal raisin cookies

Let the cookies cool on the baking sheets for a few minutes, then either slide the papers off the pans onto cooling racks or transfer the cookies with a spatula.

Once cool, store the cookies in an air-tight container.

how to make oatmeal raisin cookies

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Oatmeal Brown Sugar Cookies with Raisins & Pecans

These fabulous oatmeal cookies are slightly crispy on the outside and deliciously chewy on the inside.

Servings: Makes about 32 cookies
Total Time: 45 Minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 cup old-fashioned rolled oats (do not use quick cooking or instant oats)
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour, spooned into measuring cup and leveled-off
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter, softened but still cool
  • 1 cup packed dark brown sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3/4 cup coarsely chopped pecans
  • 3/4 cup raisins or currants

Instructions

  1. Position two racks in the middle of the oven and preheat to 350°F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together the oats, flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt.
  3. In the bowl of an electric mixer, beat together the butter and brown sugar on medium speed until creamy, about 3 minutes. Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula, then add the egg and vanilla and beat again until smooth, about 30 seconds.
  4. Add the flour and oatmeal mixture and mix on low speed until just combined; add the pecans and raisins and mix again until just combined. Do not over-mix.
  5. Drop the dough into 1-1/2-tablespoon mounds about 2 inches apart onto the prepared baking sheets. Bake for 11 to 13 minutes, rotating the pans from top to bottom and front to back halfway through, or until the edges are slightly golden but the centers are still pale. Let the cookies cool on the baking sheets for a few minutes, then either slide the papers off the pans onto cooling racks or transfer the cookies with a spatula. Once cool, store the cookies in an air-tight container.
  6. Note: The recipe can easily be doubled, but keep in mind that oatmeal cookies are best enjoyed fresh on the day they are baked.
  7. Freezer-Friendly Instructions: The Cookie Dough can be Frozen for up to 3 Months: Scoop the dough into balls, let set on a baking sheet in the freezer, then place in a sealable bag and press out as much air as possible. Bake as needed directly from the freezer. (Allow 1 to 2 minutes longer in the oven.) To Freeze After Baking: Let the cookies cool completely and store in an airtight container separating layers with parchment paper or aluminum foil. Before serving, remove the cookies from the container and let them come to room temperature.

Nutrition Information

Powered by Edamam

  • Serving size: 1 cookie
  • Calories: 105
  • Fat: 5 g
  • Saturated fat: 2 g
  • Carbohydrates: 15 g
  • Sugar: 9 g
  • Fiber: 1 g
  • Protein: 1 g
  • Sodium: 13 mg
  • Cholesterol: 52 mg

This website is written and produced for informational purposes only. I am not a certified nutritionist and the nutritional data on this site has not been evaluated or approved by a nutritionist or the Food and Drug Administration. Nutritional information is offered as a courtesy and should not be construed as a guarantee. The data is calculated through an online nutritional calculator, Edamam.com. Although I do my best to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates only. Varying factors such as product types or brands purchased, natural fluctuations in fresh produce, and the way ingredients are processed change the effective nutritional information in any given recipe. Furthermore, different online calculators provide different results depending on their own nutrition fact sources and algorithms. To obtain the most accurate nutritional information in a given recipe, you should calculate the nutritional information with the actual ingredients used in your recipe, using your preferred nutrition calculator.

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Reviews & Comments

  • Our 92 year old neighbor said these are “the best”! She loves oatmeal cookies so I’ve been making them for her. This is the first one for which she’s requested the recipe so her daughter can make them.

    We agree…they are the best!!

    • — Charlene on September 20, 2021
    • Reply
  • We love these cookies! I have made them as written, and they are delicious. Both sweet and hearty. However, this time, I didn’t have raisins, and there is a bad storm, so I just used coconut in place of the raisins. Strange, but it worked! Very yummy!

    • — Karen on September 1, 2021
    • Reply
  • Absolutely the best! These cookies were done in 12 minutes, brown, crunchy on the edges, softer in the middle. I prepared the dough using 1/2 tsp of vanilla and 1/4 tsp of expresso, divided the dough in half & used craisins and walnuts in the first batch and dark chocolate chips and walnuts in the second half. Delicious!

    • — Wendy Fair on August 14, 2021
    • Reply
  • Hi Jenn,
    Amazing recipe. I usually use 70% of the sugar in a recipe as I don’t like things really sweet. I did that here and it worked perfectly. I also had to use half raisins and half cranberries since I ran out of raisins and it was a huge success. Even the hubby and kid who were upset about the lack of chocolate chips in the cookies were converted. You’re wonderful!

    • — Smetha on July 29, 2021
    • Reply
  • These cookies are amazing! The dark brown sugar really gives the recipe a depth of flavor. That being said, I can’t make these until we have company because my husband and I ate the whole batch in two days! Try this recipe, you won’t be disappointed!

    • — Darlene on May 26, 2021
    • Reply
  • Can I substitute with whole wheat flour?

    • — Karen Morgan on May 6, 2021
    • Reply
    • Hi Karen, I’d suggest starting by using half whole wheat and half all-purpose to make sure you like the texture. If you do like it, the next time you make the cookies, you can up the ratio of whole wheat to white a bit more. Also, you may want to consider white whole wheat as it’s lighter and milder tasting than regular whole wheat flour (yet just as nutritious). I’d love to hear how they turn out!

      • — Jenn on May 6, 2021
      • Reply
  • I absolutely love these cookies. While the rest of my family loves chocolate chips in their cookies, these are MY favorite and the chocolate is never missed. I have made them with raisins, currants, and dried cranberries, and combinations of each and they are always wonderful. The other day I made them with dried dates that I had chopped up. I also used a dark brown sugar I picked up from Sprouts – Wholesome Organic Dark Brown Sugar. I typically use C&H. Let me tell you, I didn’t think the recipe could get better, but it did. The brown sugar elevated the recipe and the dates added a chewiness that I loved. Thanks for another great recipe Jenn and all the inspiration!

    • — Nicole S. on May 4, 2021
    • Reply
  • If omitting the pecans should I increase the amount of raisins?
    Thank, Mary

    • — Mary on March 22, 2021
    • Reply
    • Hi Mary, You can but you don’t have to. Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on March 22, 2021
      • Reply
  • Your recipe sounds delicious and I am anxious to try it, however I live at a higher altitude (5,000 ft), do you think your recipe will work here as printed or can you recommend any high altitude adjustments? Thank you!

    • — Cricket on March 20, 2021
    • Reply
    • Hi Cricket, Thanks for your note. I don’t have experience baking at high altitudes so, unfortunately, I don’t have any wisdom to share – I’m sorry! You may find these tips helpful though.

      • — Jenn on March 22, 2021
      • Reply
  • My favorite cookie by far. This recipe was the absolute best I have ever had that is until I added the sweetened shredded coconut. Perfection! My biggest mistake was sharing them with friends. Now I have to keep the lights out at night and shades pulled 24/7 to make people think I’m not home so they won’t stop by and hassle me for more free cookies. I was considering changing my phone number but keeping it on mute has helped quite a bit. I may have to start selling these to fund my habit now. Thanks for posting this recipe. You’re the best. If it’s on your site, I’m making it.

    • — Robert H. Gibbs on March 19, 2021
    • Reply
    • LOL!!!

      • — Jenn on March 19, 2021
      • Reply
  • Thank you Jenn: these cookies are hard to stop eating even for my husband who does not indulge in sweets! He has been helping me deplete the cookie jar.
    I used coconut sugar in place of the dark brown sugar as it has a lower glycemic index so no sugar high!! The texture is slightly more granular.
    I really like your sequential approach for no-fail results. 😋

    • — Nancy Mintz on March 18, 2021
    • Reply
  • Hi, I have made the cookies for the first time last weekend. My family and co-workers loved them. Thank you so much for sharing. However, you have mentioned this “Bake for 11 to 13 minutes, rotating the pans from top to bottom and front to back halfway through, or until the edges are slightly golden but the centers are still pale.”

    1) On the rotation of the pans, can i say 2 mins on the top, 2 mins at the bottom, 2 mins front and 2 mins back?

    2) As for the top position, how high should it be? Im afraid if it is too high up, the cookies may get burnt faster, right? Thanks.

    • — KL Yee on March 9, 2021
    • Reply
    • Hi KL,So glad everyone enjoyed the cookies! Regarding your questions, I wouldn’t bother to rotate the pans the way you describe as that would mean you opening the oven several times which will cause the temperature to fluctuate. Regarding the position of the racks, you just want to use the two center-most racks. Hope that clarifies!

      • — Jenn on March 9, 2021
      • Reply
  • This recipe has moved onto my short list of favorite cookies – but with 3/4c brown sugar and they’re almost too sweet for me who doesn’t like super-sweet and my husband was still happy. If using raisins from a conventional grocery store we recently realized Sunkist raisins are significantly better than our store-brand. I think Whole Foods or Trader Joe’s brand raisins would be fine.

    • — Carol F. on March 7, 2021
    • Reply
  • I consider myself a connoisseur of cookies and these are the best oatmeal cookies that I have ever eaten. Slightly crunchy on the outside and perfectly chewy on the inside.

    • — Susie Smith on February 26, 2021
    • Reply
  • I love these healthy cookies, they are the perfect excuse to eat cookies for breakfast!

    • — http://priyakitchenette.com/ on February 17, 2021
    • Reply
    • Everybody loved these cookies – family, friends, neighbors. I doubled the recipe but reduced the sugar by 1/4 cup (1 and 3/4 cup sugar for double recipe). I added the nuts but placed chocolate chips in half of the recipe and raisins in the other half. I will try your other cookie recipes, thank you!

      • — Helen May on July 12, 2021
      • Reply
  • I give this recipe 5 stars. I doubled
    the recipe.. I added chopped crystallized ginger to a few and they were delicious . Thanks

    • — Donna Hadsell on February 9, 2021
    • Reply

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