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Pizza Dough

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Elevate your homemade pizzas with this simple and delicious pizza dough, made with just five ingredients.

Pizza Dough

If you want to ensure a perfect crust for your homemade pizza, stromboli, or calzones, making your own pizza dough is the way to go. This simple process requires five basic ingredients — flour, salt, yeast, oil, and water — and takes only ten minutes to mix and knead. Just be sure to allow at least 90 minutes for the pizza dough to rise in a warm, draft-free spot in your kitchen before using it. This recipe makes 2 pounds of dough, which is enough for two large pizzas, four individual ones, two stromboli, or four calzones. You can make the dough up to two days in advance, and it freezes beautifully, too.

What you’ll need to make pizza dough

pizza dough ingredients

  • Olive oil adds richness to the dough and helps it crisp up in the oven.
  • A healthy dose of salt is added for flavor.
  • Cornmeal is used to dust the baking sheet and keep the dough from sticking as it bakes; it also gives the crust a bit of extra crispiness and flavor.
  • Yeast makes the dough rise. I use instant yeast, which may also be referred to as rapid-rise, quick-rise, or bread machine yeast (this is confusing, but they are all the same thing). Active dry yeast, often referred to as regular yeast, may also be used, but it will lengthen the rising time by about 50%. You can give it a little boost by rehydrating it in liquid before using (see the recipe for detailed instructions).

Step-By-Step Instructions

Mix the Dough

To begin, combine the flour, yeast, and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer.

flour salt and yeast in mixerStir with a spoon to combine, and then add the oil and warm water.

adding the oil and water to the dry ingredients

Stir until the dough comes together into a shaggy mass.

shaggy mass of pizza dough

Knead the Dough

Fit the mixer with the dough hook and knead on medium-low speed until the dough is smooth and elastic, 5 to 7 minutes. (Alternatively, you can knead the dough by hand.)

kneading pizza dough in mixerLet the Dough Rise

Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled large bowl.
pizza dough in oiled bowl

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap or a damp kitchen towel, and let the dough rise in a warm place until it has doubled in size, 1 to 2 hours.

There are a number of options that will work as places to let your dough rise: a sunny spot in your house, next to a heating vent (during colder months), or even on top of a kitchen appliance that generates a bit of heat as it runs (like your fridge). If you’re lucky enough to have a proof setting in your oven, use that. If not, but you’d like to use your oven, switch on the oven’s internal light; it will generate enough warmth to provide a good environment for the dough to rise.

pizza dough after first rise

After the dough has risen, punch it down.

punching down the doughPlace the dough on a lightly floured surface. Cut the dough in half and roll each piece into a ball.  If you’re not using the pizza dough right away, lightly coat the dough ball(s) with olive oil. Place into freezer bag(s) and seal shut, squeezing out all the air. Refrigerate for up to 2 days. When ready to use, let the dough sit out on the countertop for 30 minutes to warm up before stretching.

pizza dough balls

Cover the dough with a damp kitchen towel and let it rest for 15 to 20 minutes.

letting pizza dough rest on counterAs you can see, it will rise a bit.

pizza dough after second rise

Shape the Dough

When it comes time to shape the pizza dough for baking, you can stretch it into any shape, size, or thickness you like (just keep in mind that a thicker crust will take longer to bake). Simply press and stretch the dough using your hands, dusting with more flour if necessary.

General Baking Instructions

Every pizza recipe is a little different, but as a general guideline: Preheat the oven to 500°F and set an oven rack in the bottom position. Dust a 13×18-inch baking sheet lightly with cornmeal. Place the stretched dough on the baking sheet, and gently stretch it out again so that it maintains its shape. Spread your sauce over the dough, leaving a 1/2-inch border around the edges. Slide the baking sheet into the oven and bake for 5 to 7 minutes, until the crust is partially cooked. Remove from the oven and scatter the cheese and toppings over the sauce. Slide the pan back into the oven and cook until the crust is golden brown and the cheese is melted and bubbling, 4 to 6 minutes more.

To Refrigerate or Freeze The Pizza Dough

If you’re not using the pizza dough right away, after the initial rise, lightly coat the dough ball(s) with olive oil. Place into freezer bag(s) and seal shut, squeezing out all the air. Refrigerate for up to 2 days. When ready to use, let the dough sit out on the countertop for 30 minutes to warm up before stretching. The dough can also be frozen for up to 3 months. When ready to use, defrost in the refrigerator overnight (or for at least 12 hours), and then let it warm up on the countertop for about 30 minutes before stretching and proceeding with your pizza recipe.

Note: This recipe was updated in January 2022 to make a slightly larger quantity. To see the original recipe, click here

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Video Tutorial

Pizza Dough

Elevate your homemade pizzas with this simple and delicious pizza dough, made with just five ingredients.

Servings: Two 1-lb dough balls
Prep Time: 20 Minutes
Total Time: 20 Minutes, plus at least 90 minutes rising time

Ingredients

  • 4 cups all-purpose flour, spooned and leveled-off, plus more for dusting
  • 1 tablespoon instant/quick-rise yeast
  • 2¼ teaspoons salt
  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1¼ cups plus 2 tablespoons warm water (see note)
  • Cornmeal, for dusting the pan before baking

Instructions

  1. Combine the flour, yeast, and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer. Stir with a spoon to combine. Add the oil and water and stir until the dough comes together into a shaggy mass. Fit the stand mixer with the dough hook and knead on medium-low speed until the dough is smooth and elastic, 5 to 7 minutes. (Alternatively, you can knead the dough by hand.) The dough should be slightly tacky and cling just to the bottom of the bowl; if it seems too dry during the kneading process, add 1 tablespoon of water. If it seems too sticky, add 1 tablespoon of flour.
  2. Dust your hands with flour, then gather the dough into a ball and transfer it to a lightly oiled large bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap or a damp kitchen towel and let the dough rise in a warm place until it has doubled in size, 1 to 2 hours.
  3. When the dough has risen, punch it down and place on a lightly floured surface. Cut the dough in half and roll each piece into a ball.
  4. If you’re not using the dough right away, lightly coat the dough balls with olive oil. Place into freezer bags and seal shut, squeezing out all the air. Refrigerate for up to 2 days. When ready to use, let the dough sit out on the countertop for 30 minutes to warm up before stretching. The dough can also be frozen for up to 3 months. When ready to use, defrost in the refrigerator overnight (or for at least 12 hours), and then let it warm up on the countertop for about 30 minutes before stretching and proceeding with your pizza recipe.
  5. If you're planning to use the dough right away, cover the dough balls with a damp kitchen towel and let rest for 15 to 20 minutes (the dough will rise a bit). Using your hands, stretch the dough to the desired shape. Proceed with your pizza recipe, or follow the general baking instructions below.
  6. General Baking Instructions: Preheat the oven to 500°F and set an oven rack in the bottom position. Dust a 13x18-inch baking sheet lightly with cornmeal. Place the stretched dough on the baking sheet, and gently stretch it out again so that it maintains its shape. Spread your sauce over the dough, leaving a ½-inch border around the edges. Slide the baking sheet into the oven and bake for 5 to 7 minutes, until the crust is partially cooked. Remove from the oven and scatter the cheese and toppings over the sauce. Slide the pan back into the oven and cook until the crust is golden brown and the cheese is melted and bubbling, 4 to 6 minutes more. Remove the pizza from the oven and transfer to a cutting board. Slice and serve.
  7. Note: Active dry yeast may be used instead of instant yeast, however the dough will take longer to rise. To give active dry yeast a boost, you can dissolve it in the warm water and let it sit until frothy, about 10 minutes. Following that, add it to the mixing bowl with the flour, oil, and salt and proceed with the recipe.
  8. Note: The water should be warm to the touch — not hot — as anything over 130°F will kill the yeast and keep the dough from rising. It’s not necessary to measure the temperature, but you’re aiming for around 105°F.

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Comments

  • Can the pizza dough for this recipe be used for the three-cheese white pizza with arugula and vise versa?

    • — Carol on October 4, 2023
    • Reply
    • Yep!

      • — Jenn on October 4, 2023
      • Reply
  • I’m sorry if this has been asked already, but I could not find a reference. What are your thoughts on using 00 flour? Is this also called pizza flour? I have not used it before and want to learn more before attempting for this recipe. I have made this dough before as instructed, and thought it was great. Thank you.

    • — CB on September 22, 2023
    • Reply
    • I haven’t tried this with 00 (also called pizza) flour so can’t say for sure, but I think it’s worth a try. I’d follow the measurements in the recipe but add more water or flour if necessary to get to the right consistency (smooth and elastic). I’d love to hear how it turns out if you try it!

      • — Jenn on September 22, 2023
      • Reply
    • This recipe is amazing! I made this and I used a robust olive oil. My oven (it’s and xl personal oven/air fryer/confectionery oven/dehydrator) only goes to 450°f … I stretched the dough poked holes baked 7 minutes. Took it out and added the sauce as the recipe states, and put garlic butter (real butter) on the edges (for browning and crisping) and put back in the oven for 7 minutes. Took it out added added sauce in the dry spots, put the toppings, and put cheese on it. I baked for 7 minutes in the bottom self, and then moved to the middle rack until the cheese was as dark as I like it. Not on broil because I like my veggies a little more done. The crust was crisp the bottom was great. When you hold up a slice the end barely folds down! And no, I didn’t bake on stoneware.

      Thank you for this recipe! It is my absolute favorite.

      • — Michelle on October 14, 2023
      • Reply
  • Thanks for all the great recipes! I have a proof setting on my oven and am wondering if I still need to cover the dough while it rises.
    Thanks! Liz

    • — Liz on September 5, 2023
    • Reply
    • Yes, I’d still cover it.

      • — Jenn on September 5, 2023
      • Reply
  • I’ve made many pizza doughs and this is by far the easiest yet tastiest dough ever! Everyone absolutely raves about how delicious is was. Bookmarking this page, because it’s now our go-to. 🙂

    • — Marie on August 13, 2023
    • Reply
  • Thanks for all the terrific recipes!!! Would I need to adjust the Ingredients if I use pizza flour? Thanks, Liz

    • — Liz on August 6, 2023
    • Reply
    • Hi Liz, I haven’t tried it so can’t say for sure but I think it’s worth a try. I’d follow the measurements in the recipe but add more water or flour if necessary to get to the right consistency (smooth and elastic). I’d love to hear how it turns out if you try it!

      • — Jenn on August 7, 2023
      • Reply
  • This dough is easy to make and delicious.Used the metric cup measurements using my scale with King Arthur A/P flour in the K/A mixer did not have to change a thing.The dough is the easiest pizza dough I have ever worked with,no rolling pin required.Made Jenn`s Margherita Pizza on a pizza stone in the gas grill outside (too hot for oven right now) and the results were delicious.My new go to p/d now.Thanks Chef Jenn,

    • — lowandslow on July 20, 2023
    • Reply
  • I use pizza dough recipes that require weighing ingredients to ensure proper dough hydration.
    This recipe had so many positive reviews so I decided to be lazy and give it a try.
    I had to play around quite a bit with the flour/ water ratio. The dough was easy to manage and I thought it would be a winner, but nope. Way too dough-heavy and dry for my liking.
    I’ll go back to the recipe from Roberta’s. It’s more challenging but the results are worth it.

    • — Karena on July 1, 2023
    • Reply
  • We’ve been looking for a great pizza dough recipe and we finally found it!!! This is easy, tasty, chewy perfection. It works really great in my pizza oven. It works every time I make it.

    • — ReneeK on June 7, 2023
    • Reply
  • I apologize if someone already asked this, but could I use whole wheat flour instead of white? If so, would anything need to be adjusted?

    • — Jess on May 23, 2023
    • Reply
    • Hi Jess, I’d suggest starting by using half whole wheat and half all-purpose to make sure you like the texture. If you do like it, the next time you make this, you can up the ratio of whole wheat to white a bit more. Also, you may want to consider white whole wheat as it’s lighter and milder tasting than regular whole wheat flour (yet just as nutritious). I’d love to hear how it turns out!

      • — Jenn on May 24, 2023
      • Reply
  • I found the crust to be too salty for my liking, will try it again and reduce the amount of salt to about 3/4 tsp.

    • — Anne Villeneuve on May 20, 2023
    • Reply
  • Tasty pizza thanks to you! Easy quick crust and I will use this again.

    • — Elisabeth S on April 22, 2023
    • Reply
  • I’m having difficulty with the conversion chart from volume to weight. The dough recipe calls for 4 C of AP flour (which weighs 120 gm/cup.) In my math that equals 480 gms not the 520 your conversion calls for. Can you comment?

    • — Pat P on April 9, 2023
    • Reply
    • Hi Pat, Are you looking at my conversion chart? If so, I’m a bit confused as I indicate 1 cup of flour weighs 130 grams. If I’m misunderstanding, please LMK. Thanks!

      • — Jenn on April 10, 2023
      • Reply
  • This is my “go-to” pizza dough recipe. It’s as perfect as it gets. My only comment are the directions. I use yeast a lot so I have some comfort level with it but when my son in law tried to make it he had to throw it away 3 times! I talked him through it the next time he went to make it and told him to first get the water and yeast and salt established and then slowly add the flour mixture to the water. (Instead of adding the water/yeast to the flour mixture). This is the way I do it and it turns out perfect every time!!!

    • — Deb on April 8, 2023
    • Reply
  • Hi Jenn – I’m a newcomer to your recipes – have made several and have not been disappointed with any – from the Chocolate Banana Loaf to the Baked Corned Beef & Cabbage! I’ve always been a bread baker (48 years) but for some reason have always purchased raw dough for making pizza – well – I made yours last night for the first time and I will forever more be making it when I want to make pizza! I made the recipe exactly as written – even using my dough hook for the first time ( I like kneading by hand). I didn’t need to add extra water or flour – the dough was perfect. It ‘rolled’ out to fit the pan without springing back over much and the end product – post cooking – was delicious – light, crispy and tasty. I baked it my way, made the pizza complete and baked it @ 450 for 28 mins. on a rack one down from center. The dough was quick and easy to make and I have one in the freezer to use to make another – or something else! Thanks for the great recipes Jenn – I’m a fan!
    Bonnie – Ontario

    • — Bonnie Spence on March 26, 2023
    • Reply
  • Regarding the quantity of salt: I read review comments of at least one person, under the Stromboli recipe. She said she had made your pizza dough but that her family (and she) found the finished product to be way too salty. So I checked out your pizza dough recipe, and agree that 2 1/4 tsps of salt is way too much. I’ve made my own pizza dough for over 50 yrs, and use only 1/2 to 3/4 tsp due to watching sodium intake. Even if you aren’t watching dietary salt, the most would be 1 tsp. In general, sodium count in American diet is way too high. I always look for ways to reduce the quantity, be it by use of unsalted butter, unsalted broths, no salt baking powder, etc., or using the least possible amount of sodium itself that will still permit flavors/textures to shine through.
    Not a judgment on your recipe….just my thoughts based on five and a half decades of cooking/baking.

    • — iris on March 16, 2023
    • Reply
  • Hi Jenn;
    I was there reading your stromboli recipe and read “homemade dough”.. I’ve tried to make dough several times before and it has never worked but I thought “well, why not trying again?”. So I came here, read the recipe and comments and decided to follow/make your original recipe. All I have to say is “thank you!!” Not only did it work but it was also perfect! The texture, the taste, the baking part.. my stromboli was amazing and now I can’t wait to use the other half of the dough to make a pizza. Oh, I used the dry yeast and followed your instructions to activate it before using! I also had to knead the dough by hand cause I don’t have a mixer with a dough hook and still: perfect!!!

    Thanks for the hints, thanks for sharing, thanks for all!!

    • — Luana Silva on February 21, 2023
    • Reply
  • Hi Jenn,

    Could you please clarify your instructions regarding putting the dough in the fridge? If I put it in the fridge, do I only let it sit out for 30 minutes and skip the “Cover the dough with a damp kitchen towel and let it rest for 15 to 20 minutes” step, going straight to stretching? Or, do I let it sit for 30 minutes, cover it for 15-20 with a damp towel, and then go onto stretching it?

    Also, should I leave it covered or uncovered for the 30 minutes?

    Thanks for clarifying this section!

    • — Adrienne on February 17, 2023
    • Reply
    • Hi Adrienne, you can move to the stretching step after you remove the dough from the fridge and let it sit out for 30 minutes. (And I’d just keep it in the bag while it sits out.) Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on February 17, 2023
      • Reply
  • Jenn, I have been following you and have made several of your recipes with great success, and rave reviews from my family and friends. So I thought, let me just try her pizza dough! I’m sure it’s excellent! I followed your recipe precisely, used Fleischman’s Instant Yeast and found the dough was WAY too sticky! I added first 1 Tbsp flour … still sticky. Added a second Tbsp, mixed it into the dough, covered the bowl with a damp tea towel and let it rest for 7 minutes, and still found it to be too sticky. Any ideas or suggestions on how to fix this problem for next go at the recipe?

    • — Lori J on February 12, 2023
    • Reply
    • Hi Lori, What brand of flour are you using? Are you in a humid climate?

      • — Jenn on February 13, 2023
      • Reply
      • Hi Jenn. I always use, and have been very successful with, Robin Hood all-purpose flour. I am definitely NOT in a humid climate

        • — Lori J on February 18, 2023
        • Reply
        • Considering that, I think you may just need to add more flour. You’d be fine adding up to an additional 1/2 cup.

          • — Jenn on February 22, 2023
          • Reply
  • Made this today using the recipe from the first cookbook. I followed the directions and baked in a 18 inch round cast iron fry pan (one pie at a time). The crust was so good and the combination of minced garlic and the cheeses was spot on as well as the arugula lemony topping – so good.
    I had leftover chicken parm and warmed up the pizza and put that on top and had that for dinner.
    Jenn, you are the reason that my Kitchen Aid mixer is out on my countertop all of the time now. I’ve made so many of your recipes and all have been delicious. Nothing makes me crazier than making a recipe that turns into a waste of time and ingredients and since I’ve been following your recipes I’ve never had that happen.

    • — Marilyn S on February 9, 2023
    • Reply
    • 💗

      • — Jenn on February 10, 2023
      • Reply
  • Do you use weight measurement (grams) when you develop your recipes and convert to volume (Cup) measurement for the printed recipes?

    • — Ross on February 9, 2023
    • Reply
    • Hi Ross, I mostly use cup measures when cooking at home and covert to metric for readers to who prefer to use it.

      • — Jenn on February 11, 2023
      • Reply
  • I made this last night, using the “older” recipe from your first cookbook. Came out great! The first pizza dough that didn’t spring back when stretched (yay!). The flavor was great and it made two good sized rectangular pizzas that I baked on my USA cookie sheets. Thanks for my success!

    • — Marybeth on January 1, 2023
    • Reply
  • I love this recipe. Made it a few times, with the same mistake occurring. The dough comes out perfect every single time. As instructed, I partially bake the crust with the sauce on it, I add the toppings and cook for the specific time range but, the cheese isn’t melted and certainly not browned in any areas. We always put it back in the oven and get the desired melted and browned cheese, but the crust is so hard, it’s not edible. What am I doing wrong? Should I bake it on the top self the second time in the oven? Pls help, Jenn! We love all you recipes and have both of your cookbooks. You are my go-to for cooking and baking.

    • — Sue on September 14, 2022
    • Reply
    • Hi Sue, So glad you enjoy the recipes! I’m not sure why that’s happening – sounds like it could be an oven temperature issue. Going forward, I would just add the cheese and toppings at the beginning with the sauce.

      • — Jenn on September 17, 2022
      • Reply
      • That!s exactly what cit could be. We have nothing but trouble with inconsistent oven temps even with it Re-calibrated often and a thermometer inside the oven. Three of the same type will give us three different readings. Thank You! I keep a more vigilant eye. next time.

        • — Sue on September 17, 2022
        • Reply
  • Hi Jenn,
    Could you please give the weight of the flour rather than the measurements? I weighed my flour to be 480 grams (120 gms per cup) and the dough was way too wet. Ended up adding 4 tablespoons more of flour and the dough still seems wet. Crossing my fingers here….

    • — Susan on August 26, 2022
    • Reply
    • Hi Susan, The great majority of my recipes (including this one) include conversions to metric/weight measurements. To view them, scroll down to the recipe, and immediately under the recipe title on the right side, you’ll see a little toggle. If you move it from “cup measures” to metric, you’ll see measurements that will work for you. I know you’ll see some variation online if you convert cups to grams, but everytime I’ve weighed my flour, it comes out to 130 grams per cup, so that would account for the discrepancy. Hope the crust came out okay!

      • — Jenn on August 26, 2022
      • Reply
      • I’ve wondered many times what 1 cup of flour weighs with your way of measuring and only found the button to switch from metric to cup measurements when I saw your response here! That’s so helpful to have that feature!!

        • — Mary S on January 13, 2023
        • Reply
  • Hi Jenn:

    As someone with Celiac disease, I am always looking for ways to make recipes gluten free. Can the pizza dough recipe be made with gluten free flour? I typically use Cup for Cup when baking so substituting is easy. Really enjoy your recipes.

    • — Susan McKinnon on August 4, 2022
    • Reply
    • Hi Susan, I’ve never tried myself but I think it should work. Please LMK how it turns out!

      • — Jenn on August 7, 2022
      • Reply
      • A newly purchased pizza oven and so trawled through numerous recipes for a pizza dough. Yours was the first I tried and it was just perfect from ease of making , taste and consistency. Just delicious! I’m sticking with this one, thank you.

        • — Jenny on August 14, 2022
        • Reply
  • Jenn,

    You always give us wonderful recipes and this recipe is no exception! I really like this pizza dough! I also use it with your Stromboli recipe and it is DELICIOUS! I have such confidence in your recipes that I made the pizza dough for homemade pizza for a friend for lunch without testing it. Thank you for these tried and true recipes!

    • — Sally on July 23, 2022
    • Reply
    • 💗

      • — Jenn on July 24, 2022
      • Reply
  • Love this pizza dough recipe and the margarita pizza recipe as well. I am purchasing new pans similar to ones you use that have the ridges
    The one I’m considering is by USA.
    All the pans I’ve researched say “safe to 450 degrees”. Which brand of pans do you use , since these recipes call for 500 degrees baking-temperature ? Thank you for assisting. My family asks for your pizza recipes so frequently!

    • — Jennie on July 14, 2022
    • Reply
    • Glad you like the dough! I use USA pans and love them! This is the one I have and I’ve never had a problem with using them in a 500 degree oven. In case it’s helpful, you can see all my favorite baking pans here.

      • — Jenn on July 15, 2022
      • Reply
  • I read through the comments and was surprised that some did not like this. I have made this recipe many times- both the old and the new one. I think it is the best and so do all the folks I made it for. I have to say above and beyond a wonderful and easy crust- it is so much fun to make a bunch of dough and have a pizza party. We have done this twice this week! What a great time and great memories! So, not only do you give us wonderful recipes and ideas, you help very much in making happy occasions for family and friends. I probably would have given up on cooking much if I had not started using your recipes- I am now confident and don’t stress about it anymore! Back to the pizza dough: I have made this with AP flour, a mix of 00 flour and bread flour-all are wonderful! Probably the 00 flour makes it an easier dough to come together- but all have brought many compliments. I divide this recipe into 3 small balls of dough, put them in plastic bags and everyone gets their own bag-From there they form their crust and add the toppings of choice. Also, I forgot to buy pizza sauce last time and used your sauce from your margarita pizza recipe. It was so easy, so fresh, and so delicious! I will just make this in the future for our pizza sauce. One thing I do recommend is the yeast from. King Author Flour and their pizza seasoning. So good! Thank you so much Jenn for your great recipes! They have made our family occasions so very nice and fun!

    • — Cheryl Skornik on July 2, 2022
    • Reply
  • You must have a lot friends who writes without really try the recipe. 4 cups of flour and 1 and whatever of water don’t give you a dough.

    • — Claudia on June 4, 2022
    • Reply
    • If you simply mixed flour and water, then no, that doesn’t give you dough😂 but if you add ALL the ingredients, as listed on the recipe, then perhaps that’ll give you the dough 🤷🏻‍♀️

      • — Carolyn on July 15, 2022
      • Reply
  • Had problems with this pizza dough. Wasn’t very easy to stretch and seemed dry. I used bread flour instead of AP flour so don’t know if that made a difference. And I did add a little more water because it seemed dry. I left it rest several times as I tried to stretch it in the pan but no luck. It required more baking time then the recipe shows and we didn’t really like the taste, kinda bland.

    • — Jeanne on June 4, 2022
    • Reply
    • yes, that made a difference. Bread flour has a different amount of gluten to it, and absorbs more water, and yes, that matters greatly and affects the results a lot. You can’t really substitute the main ingredient and then put 1 star because (surprise!) it didn’t turn out as expected. There is a reason there are different types of flour for different purposes and they are marked and sold as such.

      • — Kate on September 1, 2022
      • Reply
  • Hi Jenn ! I made this recipe, but I am having terrible time stretching the dough into the size/shape for pizza. I was doing it by hand and with a roller, but the dough just shrinks right back to original size:shape. Any recommendations ?

    • — Bill on April 3, 2022
    • Reply
    • Hi Bill, sorry you’re struggling with this! I’d re-cover the dough with plastic wrap (or a kitchen towel) and let it sit for about 15 minutes. That will help the gluten in the dough relax, and make it easier to stretch. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on April 4, 2022
      • Reply
  • Thank you for putting the original recipe up! I had to use the Wayback Machine to find it. The new recipe is fussy and doesn’t do as well as the original. I noticed my first rise was sad and had to do a second rise to get the dough in a usable state.

    Thank you again!

    • — Darryl T on March 11, 2022
    • Reply
  • Hi Jenn! I received a stand mixer at Christmas and made this recipe 4-5 times with great success. It was amazing to see how the dough became a perfect ball with just the dough hook—all by itself!

    But the last two times I’ve made the recipe, using the exact same ingredients and technique, a ball is not forming. Most of the dough is forming a ball, but some of the dough just puddles up on the bottom. Any thoughts? TIA!

    • — Steph on March 8, 2022
    • Reply
    • Hi Steph, Do you mean some of the dough sticks to the bottom of the bowl? That would be normal as the dough is a bit tacky, but you can try adding 1 to 2 tablespoons more flour towards the end of the kneading process if you’d prefer a drier dough. (Also, I updated the recipe in January to make a larger quantity and also include a bit more water, as I was finding the dough to be a bit dry. Is it possible you originally made the old recipe? If you scroll up a bit over the “You May Also Like” section, you’ll find a link to the old recipe.)

      • — Jenn on March 8, 2022
      • Reply
      • The comments are SO helpful on this site. I just experienced the same thing. I’ve been using a printed version of the old recipe. When I made this one, it didn’t form the ball of dough that I was expecting. Glad to see that’s “as expected” … Fingers crossed this turns out like the old version. 🙂 I’m sure it will be even better!

        • — Jill T on January 27, 2023
        • Reply
  • In your photo it looks like you used an egg which I don’t see listed in the ingredients. However, an egg added to home baked pizza really adds flavor to the dough.

    • — Carol L deSousa on February 7, 2022
    • Reply
    • Hi Carol, I see which picture you’re referring to and understand why it looks like I’ve added an egg to the mix, but that’s just the oil that I’ve added to the dry ingredients. Feel free to add an egg to the dough if you’d like though!

      • — Jenn on February 9, 2022
      • Reply
      • Ok I know a number of Italian recipes call for one egg in the dough and it does kick the flavor up a notch. You should try it and see how you like it.

        • — Carol L deSousa on February 10, 2022
        • Reply
  • Wonderful dough! I’ve tried a few different pizza dough recipes and yours is my favorite so far. Please add gram measurements for the yeast and salt! The only measurement in grams is for the flour.

    • — Dani on February 5, 2022
    • Reply
    • Hi Dani, So glad you like this! I usually don’t add grams for teaspoons and tablespoons, but based on what I see online, it looks like 1 tablespoon of instant yeast is the equivalent of just over 9 grams and 2-1/4 teaspoons of salt are the equivalent 13.5 grams. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on February 7, 2022
      • Reply
      • Thank you!!

        • — Dani on February 20, 2022
        • Reply
  • Hello, I am just realizing that you have updated this recipe, can you maybe post the original again?? I loved that one and it was perfect for my 12 inch pizza pans, I really should start writing these things down!!

    Thank you

    • — Dani on February 5, 2022
    • Reply
    • Hi Dani, Yes, I did change it. My rationale was that many people end up using store-bought dough for my pizza recipes. That dough is typically sold in 16-ounce packages and so I figured I should increase the amounts in this recipe to make it consistent. I will add a link to the old recipe soon!

      • — Jenn on February 9, 2022
      • Reply
      • Please do add the link to the old recipe because this one is not turning out as well for me either.

        • — Andrea on February 20, 2022
        • Reply
        • Hi Andrea, Sorry to hear you haven’t had as much success with this! You can find the link to the old recipe immediately under the last picture of the dough.

          • — Jenn on February 21, 2022
          • Reply
  • Hi Jenn! This was my first time making homemade pizza and it turned out great! Used both your dough and sauce recipes.
    One thing I’m wondering though – is there a way to get the crust a bit crispier on the outside? Maybe rub some oil on it?

    • — Siobhan on January 10, 2022
    • Reply
    • Hi Siobhan, Glad you liked it! Are you partially cooking the crust and sauce before adding the cheese, like I do here? That helps a lot. Otherwise, for a more crispy crust, you could bake it a little longer or rub some oil along the edges.

      • — Jenn on January 11, 2022
      • Reply
      • I did partially cook it, but will try it for a little longer and with a little oil as well. Thanks for the reply, and for all your great recipes. Take care.

        • — Siobhan on January 16, 2022
        • Reply
  • The best pizza dough I’ve ever done! We use a pre-heated lodge cast iron pizza pan and skip the preheating portion (and cornmeal).
    Thank you so much!

    • — Emily on January 1, 2022
    • Reply
  • Hi Jenn. This is the best pizza dough recipe. We have pizza every Saturday. Excellent!

  • Another success. Thank you Jen!

    • I liked it but the next time I make the dough I would add a little honey.
      Being I’m from Jersey I’m spoiled with pizza. The pizza looked great. The taste wad bland. That’s my fault for buying cheap cheese and sauce. Next one will be better with my homemade pizza sauce.

      • — Dean Enquist on December 6, 2021
      • Reply
  • ALWAYS perfect!!! Thanks Jen!

  • Hi Jenn! I accidentally bought self rising flour. Can I still use it, or adjust any ingredients so that I will be able to use it for pizza dough? Thanks!

    • I wouldn’t recommend it, Julie. You could try googling to see if there’s a pizza dough recipe that uses self-rising flour. Sorry!

  • Pizza dough came out really well. One thing I found was it was too thin in some areas and too thick on others when I spread it. Had trouble getting a uniform thickness.

  • Hi Jenn – I have to say, all your recipes are fabulous!
    Would this pizza dough work for calzones too??

    • So glad you like the recipes! Yes, I do think this would work for calzones. 🙂

  • If I were to double this recipe, do I double the yeast too?

    • Yep – hope you enjoy!

  • Looking for pizza dough recipe, after failing numerous times, but I gave it another go. Thought, Jenn has never failed me, will try hers. Sure enough, she always makes me look like a genius in the kitchen. Great directions, photos easiest dough to roll out, delicious!

  • Always so good! And it freezes very well too — an added bonus for me

  • What a wonderful website you have created. First time after many try’s that my dough turned out correctly. Thank you! (Also used to live in the dc metro (Alexandria), now in cold MN). Looking forward to trying more recipes! Thanks!

  • Has anyone used whole wheat flour and if so did you make any other modifications?

    • Yes, I substitute 1 cup of all purpose flour with a cup of whole wheat with excellent results.

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