Homemade Matzo

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Light, flaky, and crisp — homemade matzo is a world apart from store-bought.

To be honest, homemade matzo has never been at the top of my list of recipes to try, but when I braved the grocery store this week to get my Passover staples — brisket, horseradish, matzo meal, etc. — there was no matzo to be had. It didn’t feel right to celebrate Passover without matzo, so I decided to attempt a homemade version. I had a couple of misses. My first batch was rock-hard and tasted like cardboard (which you could argue sounds about right). My second batch was tasty but so crisp and delicate that it shattered into a million crumbs when I took a bite (I am doing enough vacuuming these days). Finally, my third batch was just right: flaky, tender, and perfectly crisp (good thing because I am almost out of flour).

Adapted from Mark Bittman in the New York Times, this olive oil-enriched matzo is a cinch to make and so much better than store-bought. The dough is a pleasure to work with, and the matzos bake in just five minutes. Note that this matzo is not kosher for Passover — Jewish law requires only flour and water to be used, among other things — but we’re bending the rules this year.

What you’ll need to make homemade matzo

You need four simple ingredients — all-purpose flour, salt, olive oil, and water.

How to make homemade matzo

To begin, combine the flour, salt and olive oil in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel blade.

Once the food processor is on, add 1/2 cup water. Continue to run the food processor until dough forms a firm ball, rides around on the blade and is not at all sticky, about 2 minutes.

Place the dough on a clean spot on your kitchen counter.

Cut the dough into 12 small balls — this is easiest if you cut the ball in half, then in half again, then into thirds.

On a lightly-floured surface, flatten each ball into a 3-inch patty.

Use a rolling pin to roll each patty into a 6- to 8-inch circle. The shapes can be irregular, but the dough should be so thin you can almost see through it.

Put a few pieces of the rolled out dough on the prepared baking sheet. (I can usually fit about three.) Prick the dough all over with a fork.

matzo pricked and ready to bake

Bake in a 500°F-oven for 2 to 4 minutes, keeping a very close eye on them, until they are golden and puffed in spots.

Flip the matzos and cook for 1 to 2 minutes more, until lightly golden all over.

Let the matzos cool and enjoy.

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Homemade Matzo

Light, flaky, and crisp — homemade matzo is a world apart from store-bought.

Servings: 12 matzo crackers
Prep Time: 10 Minutes
Cook Time: 20 Minutes
Total Time: 30 Minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour, spooned into measuring cup and leveled-off
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 cup water

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 500°F and set an oven rack in the middle position.
  2. Put the flour, salt and olive oil in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel blade. Once the food processor is on, add the water.
  3. Continue to run the food processor until dough forms a rough ball, rides around on the blade and is not at all sticky, about 90 seconds.
  4. Place the dough on a clean spot on your kitchen counter. Cut the dough into 12 small balls — this is easiest if you cut the ball in half, then in half again, then into thirds.
  5. On a lightly-floured surface, use your hand to flatten each ball into a 3-inch patty. Use a rolling pin to roll each patty into a 6- to 8-inch circle. The shapes can be irregular, but the dough should be so thin you can almost see through it. (It's good to turn the dough a few times as you roll to prevent sticking, but you don't need to worry about it too much as the dough is easy to peel of the counter.)
  6. Put a few pieces of the rolled out dough on a 13 x 18-inch baking sheet (I can usually fit 3). Prick the dough all over with a fork (this keeps it from puffing up too much).
  7. Bake for 2 to 4 minutes, keeping a very close eye on them, until they are golden and puffed in spots. Flip the matzos over and cook for 1 to 2 minutes more on the second side, until golden. Repeat with all the dough and let cool completely. Store in an air-tight container for up to 2 days.

Nutrition Information

Powered by Edamam

  • Serving size: 1 matzo
  • Calories: 129
  • Fat: 6 g
  • Saturated fat: 1 g
  • Carbohydrates: 16 g
  • Sugar: 0 g
  • Fiber: 1 g
  • Protein: 2 g
  • Sodium: 85 mg
  • Cholesterol: 0 mg

This website is written and produced for informational purposes only. I am not a certified nutritionist and the nutritional data on this site has not been evaluated or approved by a nutritionist or the Food and Drug Administration. Nutritional information is offered as a courtesy and should not be construed as a guarantee. The data is calculated through an online nutritional calculator, Edamam.com. Although I do my best to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates only. Varying factors such as product types or brands purchased, natural fluctuations in fresh produce, and the way ingredients are processed change the effective nutritional information in any given recipe. Furthermore, different online calculators provide different results depending on their own nutrition fact sources and algorithms. To obtain the most accurate nutritional information in a given recipe, you should calculate the nutritional information with the actual ingredients used in your recipe, using your preferred nutrition calculator.

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Reviews & Comments

  • Wow! I was thrilled to see this recipe. I grew up in Northern NJ where Jewish and Italian foods were ubiquitous. Matzos were a staple in my home; so much so that I took them for granted. Now I live in a rural area in another state in which matzos, even during Passover, are difficult to find and usually stale! So, I tried these, added some garlic and onion powder, and was so pleased with the results. I now have them on hand all the time. If I only could figure out how to replicate that egg and onion flavor….

    • — Priscilla M Rae on May 21, 2020
    • Reply
  • I am eternally grateful for this recipe. It seems that matzo was as scarce as TP this year. It’s so traditional to have this for the holidays. Bless you

    • — Sharon Zeller on April 14, 2020
    • Reply
    • 🙂 Happy Pesach!

      • — Jenn on April 15, 2020
      • Reply
  • Jenn, let me add my thanks for such a great recipe. It was so easy to make and was delicious—much, much better than store bought. My question: do you think I could use the extra matzoh for Matzoh Brei? I see below that you don’t recommend using it as matzoh meal for matzoh balls but I thought maybe? Thanks.

    • — JoAnna on April 11, 2020
    • Reply
    • So glad you enjoyed it, JoAnna. I do think it’d work for matzo brei. Please LMK how it turns out. 🙂

      • — Jenn on April 11, 2020
      • Reply
      • It turned out perfectly! I pre-soaked the matzoh in hot tap water for 30 seconds before I poured off the water and added eggs. Thanks again, Jenn!

        • — JoAnna on April 12, 2020
        • Reply
  • These were easy and delicious. Best matzoh I’ve eaten. Thank you!

    • — Sue S on April 10, 2020
    • Reply
  • This recipe is excellent. I made it this morning with my 3 year old grandsons as part of their temporary home nursery school. We discussed Passover and its meaning and then made the matzo together. It was just the right length to keep them occupied.
    I used white whole wheat flour and had to add extra water in order to form a dough ball.
    Quite tasty but next time, probably later this week, I will various spices.
    Thank you for such an easy and good recipe. Happy Passover!

    • — Geri on April 10, 2020
    • Reply
  • This recipe is WONDERFUL. Thank you so much. Yesterday I made a batch of Kosher matzo in 18 minutes. It was thick and hard as a rock, perhaps similar to that made by our ancestors. Today I made your recipe, and it was exactly as you demonstrated. It baked up perfectly. It’s thin. It’s pretty. And it’s delicious!

    • — Dee Trasen on April 9, 2020
    • Reply
  • I was SO excited to see this recipe-it was easy and delicious! 100x better than store bought-thank you and Chag Samaech!

    • — Laura on April 9, 2020
    • Reply
  • Hi. Could you make the recipe to completion and then grind to powder or flakes, add eggs etc., to make your own matzo balls?

    • — Dani on April 9, 2020
    • Reply
    • For the most predictable results, I wouldn’t recommend it. Sorry!

      • — Jenn on April 10, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi Jen,
    Can this be made with King Arthur’s gluten free flour?
    Happy Passover!

    • — Linda on April 9, 2020
    • Reply
    • Submitted this before Stefany’s same question. Will try and let you know how it comes out.
      Your recipes are consistently excellent, btw, so I’m guessing this will be no different.

      • — Linda on April 9, 2020
      • Reply
  • Happy Passover! I can’t wait to try this exactly as you’ve done it – but any thoughts on how to make egg matzoh? Maybe add egg yolk and use less oil or water? My family’s favorite is the ever-elusive Aviv brand egg and onion matzoh.

    • — Sheri on April 9, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Sheri, Yes I think it’d work to reduce the oil by 1.5 tablespoons and add one egg yolk. I’d love to know how it turns out if you try it!

      • — Jenn on April 9, 2020
      • Reply
  • The markets were all out of Gluten Free Matzoh. Do you know if you can use GF Flour? I know the brand/ingredients are all very different.

    • — Stefany on April 9, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Stefany, I do think it’d work here.

      • — Jenn on April 9, 2020
      • Reply
      • The recipe worked okay, but it didn’t taste as good as I thought it would..but I’m comparing it to the Yehuda gf Matzoh which I see contains honey, potato flakes and egg yolk.
        A few notes:
        I found it a little trickier to roll out dough thinly without it breaking 😕 was so much easier in the days I could eat gluten.
        I needed extra water to get the gf flour dough to come together.
        I used light olive oil. Next time I use extra virgin olive oil to impart more flavour.
        Also will try adding a teaspoon of honey and just a tiny bit more salt as well.
        Thanks for your recipe. It’s always tricky when you substitute things from original recipe. Just thought someone might appreciate my feedback.

        • — Kathryn on April 10, 2020
        • Reply
  • Never mind about my question. I just made these without a food processor, adding the water a little bit at a time and they turned out great! So glad to have this recipe since our rural county doesn’t carry matzoh (or any Passover foods).

    • — Lynn on April 9, 2020
    • Reply
  • Ahhh, this came a day too late! Tried a different recipe for our Seder last night. Stowing this away for next year!

    • — Colleen on April 9, 2020
    • Reply
  • I am SO excited to make this! Store bough matzah just is kind of terrible. I can imagine adding some dried herbs to this to spice it up. Jenn – any adjustments to make if I use whole wheat flour?

    • — Elizabeth on April 9, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Elizabeth, I think this matzo would be wonderful with herbs or spices. I worry it will be dry and not as flaky with whole wheat flour; I’d use white whole wheat flour or sub just a fraction (1/4 to 1/2 cup) of the all-purpose flour with whole wheat.

      • — Jenn on April 9, 2020
      • Reply
      • I used white whole wheat flour and sprinkled Everything But the Bagel seasoning on it. Delicious for Shabbat tonight!

        • — Elizabeth on April 10, 2020
        • Reply
  • Can these be made without a food processor? If so, could you offer directions? Thanks!

    • — Lynn on April 9, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Lynn, It’s fine to mix in a bowl by hand or in a stand mixer; you’ll just need to knead the dough for 5 to 7 minutes. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on April 9, 2020
      • Reply

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