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Pizza Dough Recipe

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This pizza dough recipe yields a crispy, chewy, and flavorful pizza crust.

Whether you’re making homemade pizza, stromboli, or calzones, the best way to ensure a good crust is to make it yourself. If you’ve never made homemade pizza dough, it may seem a little daunting, but it couldn’t be any easier. Pizza dough is made with five basic ingredients — flour, salt, yeast, oil, and water — and it comes together in just ten minutes. Once the dough is mixed and kneaded, you place it in a warm spot to rise. I promise, it really is easy and worthwhile. This recipe yields 2 pounds of pizza dough, which is enough for 2 large pizzas or 4 individual ones. It can be made up to two days ahead of time, and it freezes beautifully, too.

What you’ll need to make pizza dough

pizza dough ingredients

  • Olive oil adds richness to the dough and help it crisp up in the oven.
  • A healthy dose of salt is added for flavor — this is important, as pizza dough can be bland.
  • Cornmeal is used to dust the baking sheet and keep the dough from sticking as it bakes; it also gives the crust a bit of extra crispiness and flavor.
  • Yeast makes the dough rise. I use instant yeast, which may also be referred to as rapid-rise, quick-rise, or bread machine yeast (this is confusing, but they are all the same thing). Active dry yeast, often referred to as regular yeast, may also be used, but it will take lengthen the rising time by about 50%. You can give it a little boost by rehydrating it in liquid before using (see the recipe for detailed instructions).

Step-By-Step Instructions

To begin, combine the flour, yeast, and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer.

flour salt and yeast in mixerStir with a spoon to combine, and then add the oil and warm water.

adding the oil and water to the dry ingredients

Stir until the dough comes together into a shaggy mass.

shaggy mass of pizza dough

Fit the mixer with the dough hook and knead on medium-low speed until the dough is smooth and elastic, 5 to 7 minutes. (Alternatively, you can knead the dough by hand.)

kneading pizza dough in mixerTransfer the dough to a lightly oiled large bowl.

pizza dough in oiled bowl

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap or a damp kitchen towel, and let the dough rise in a warm place until it has doubled in size, 1 to 2 hours.

There are a number of options that will work as places to let your dough rise: a sunny spot in your house, next to a heating vent (during colder months), or even on top of a kitchen appliance that generates a bit of heat as it runs (like your fridge). If you’re lucky enough to have a proof setting in your oven, use that. If not, but you’d like to use your oven, switch on the oven’s internal light; it will generate enough warmth to provide a good environment for the dough to rise.

pizza dough after first rise

After the dough has risen, punch it down.

punching down the doughPlace the dough on a lightly floured surface. Cut the dough in half and roll each piece into a ball.  If you’re not using the pizza dough right away, lightly coat the dough ball(s) with olive oil. Place into freezer bag(s) and seal shut, squeezing out all the air. Refrigerate for up to 2 days. When ready to use, let the dough sit out on the countertop for 30 minutes to warm up before stretching.

pizza dough balls

Cover the dough with a damp kitchen towel and let it rest for 15 to 20 minutes.

letting pizza dough rest on counterAs you can see, it will rise a bit.

pizza dough after second rise

When it comes time to shape the pizza dough for baking, you can stretch it into any shape, size, or thickness you like (just keep in mind that a thicker crust will take longer to bake). Simply press and stretch the dough using your hands, dusting with more flour if necessary.

General Baking Instructions

Every pizza recipe is a little different, but as a general guideline: Preheat the oven to 500°F and set an oven rack in the bottom position. Dust a 13×18-inch baking sheet lightly with cornmeal. Place the stretched dough on the baking sheet, and gently stretch it out again so that it maintains its shape. Spread your sauce over the dough, leaving a 1/2-inch border around the edges. Slide the baking sheet into the oven and bake for 5 to 7 minutes, until the crust is partially cooked. Remove from the oven and scatter the cheese and toppings over the sauce. Slide the pan back into the oven and cook until the crust is golden brown and the cheese is melted and bubbling, 4 to 6 minutes more.

To Refrigerate or Freeze The Pizza Dough

If you’re not using the pizza dough right away, after the initial rise, lightly coat the dough ball(s) with olive oil. Place into freezer bag(s) and seal shut, squeezing out all the air. Refrigerate for up to 2 days. When ready to use, let the dough sit out on the countertop for 30 minutes to warm up before stretching. The dough can also be frozen for up to 3 months. When ready to use, defrost in the refrigerator overnight (or for at least 12 hours), and then let it warm up on the countertop for about 30 minutes before stretching and proceeding with your pizza recipe.

Note: This recipe was updated in January 2022 to make a slightly larger quantity. To see the original recipe, click here

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Pizza Dough

This pizza dough recipe yields a crispy, chewy, and flavorful pizza crust.

Servings: Two 1-lb dough balls
Prep Time: 20 Minutes
Total Time: 20 Minutes, plus at least 90 minutes rising time

Ingredients

  • 4 cups all-purpose flour, spooned and leveled-off, plus more for dusting
  • 1 tablespoon instant/quick-rise yeast
  • 2¼ teaspoons salt
  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1¼ cups plus 2 tablespoons warm water (see note)
  • Cornmeal, for dusting the pan before baking

Instructions

  1. Combine the flour, yeast, and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer. Stir with a spoon to combine. Add the oil and water and stir until the dough comes together into a shaggy mass. Fit the stand mixer with the dough hook and knead on medium-low speed until the dough is smooth and elastic, 5 to 7 minutes. (Alternatively, you can knead the dough by hand.) The dough should be slightly tacky and cling just to the bottom of the bowl; if it seems too dry during the kneading process, add 1 tablespoon of water. If it seems too sticky, add 1 tablespoon of flour.
  2. Dust your hands with flour, then gather the dough into a ball and transfer it to a lightly oiled large bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap or a damp kitchen towel and let the dough rise in a warm place until it has doubled in size, 1 to 2 hours.
  3. When the dough has risen, punch it down and place on a lightly floured surface. Cut the dough in half and roll each piece into a ball.
  4. If you’re not using the dough right away, lightly coat the dough balls with olive oil. Place into freezer bags and seal shut, squeezing out all the air. Refrigerate for up to 2 days. When ready to use, let the dough sit out on the countertop for 30 minutes to warm up before stretching. The dough can also be frozen for up to 3 months. When ready to use, defrost in the refrigerator overnight (or for at least 12 hours), and then let it warm up on the countertop for about 30 minutes before stretching and proceeding with your pizza recipe.
  5. If you're planning to use the dough right away, cover the dough balls with a damp kitchen towel and let rest for 15 to 20 minutes (the dough will rise a bit). Using your hands, stretch the dough to the desired shape. Proceed with your pizza recipe, or follow the general baking instructions below.
  6. General Baking Instructions: Preheat the oven to 500°F and set an oven rack in the bottom position. Dust a 13x18-inch baking sheet lightly with cornmeal. Place the stretched dough on the baking sheet, and gently stretch it out again so that it maintains its shape. Spread your sauce over the dough, leaving a ½-inch border around the edges. Slide the baking sheet into the oven and bake for 5 to 7 minutes, until the crust is partially cooked. Remove from the oven and scatter the cheese and toppings over the sauce. Slide the pan back into the oven and cook until the crust is golden brown and the cheese is melted and bubbling, 4 to 6 minutes more. Remove the pizza from the oven and transfer to a cutting board. Slice and serve.
  7. Note: Active dry yeast may be used instead of instant yeast, however the dough will take longer to rise. To give active dry yeast a boost, you can dissolve it in the warm water and let it sit until frothy, about 10 minutes. Following that, add it to the mixing bowl with the flour, oil, and salt and proceed with the recipe.
  8. Note: The water should be warm to the touch — not hot — as anything over 130°F will kill the yeast and keep the dough from rising. It’s not necessary to measure the temperature, but you’re aiming for around 105°F.

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Comments

  • Good morning, I am wondering if 00 flour would work in this recipe. I bought 8 lbs and need to use it for something. I made this recipe before and it was delicious with AP flour. Thank you in advance.

    • — Cheryl on February 8, 2021
    • Reply
    • Hi Cheryl, I haven’t tried it so can’t say for sure but I think it’s worth a try. I’d follow the measurements in the recipe but add more water or flour if necessary to get to the right consistency (smooth and elastic). I’d love to hear how it turns out if you try it!

      • — Jenn on February 8, 2021
      • Reply
      • HI Jenn, I made your recipe with half 00 flour and half ap flour. It turned out well. Thank you for all the great recipes you share with us!

        • — Cheryl Skornik on February 24, 2021
        • Reply
        • So glad it came out well — thanks for the follow-up!

          • — Jenn on February 24, 2021
          • Reply
  • Hello, all I have is tradional yeast, would that work?

    • — Janice Tkach on February 6, 2021
    • Reply
    • Hi Janice, by traditional, I’m assuming you mean active dry yeast? If so, yes, it can be used instead of instant yeast, however, the dough will take longer to rise. To give active dry yeast a boost, you can dissolve it in the warm water and let it sit until frothy, about 10 minutes. Following that, add it to the mixing bowl with the flour, oil, and salt and proceed with the recipe. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on February 8, 2021
      • Reply
  • I made a traditional tomato sauce and pepperoni pizza with this dough. The dough rose beautifully and was so light, compared to other dough recipes. We totally enjoyed and this will be my go to pizza dough recipe.

    • — Mari on February 3, 2021
    • Reply
  • I love this pizza dough! I have made it at least a dozen times and it always turns out amazing. Because my family needs four pizzas, we usually double the recipe to make the right amount. We have even kept it in the fridge for a day or two after making and it turns out just as well. I will always make this recipe when making pizza!

    • — Annie Bacon on February 1, 2021
    • Reply
  • This Pizza Dough is so simple and delicious. I stretch it thin for the adults that don’t want too much bread with their pizza. Also I keep it thick for easy to eat pizza for the kids. I love making the dough on Wednesday and having a fun and easy Friday night pizza party ready to go . I just pull out the dough from the refrigerator on Friday night and fresh pizza for all. My husband says thanks for saving him lots of money on take out!

    • — LuAnn Pitts on January 31, 2021
    • Reply
  • Wouldn’t bread flour work better to make a good chewy dough and help form the gluten better?
    I do like this recipe and it’s definitely worth making!

    • — Brian Loke on January 31, 2021
    • Reply
    • Hi Brian, bread flour is great here; I don’t call for it in the recipe as most people don’t have it on hand but feel free to use it if you’d like. Hope that clarifies!

      • — Jenn on February 2, 2021
      • Reply
  • Recipe is easy to follow and the crust came out restaurant style!

    • — Isabella on January 30, 2021
    • Reply
  • Really excellent pizza crust! Mine rose beautifully; however, I did have some difficulty rolling it out (I made one large pizza rather than 2 smaller ones). A rolling pin was useful in rolling out the dough before putting on my sauce. Also, the dough seemed to puff up quite a bit – I have used previous recipes saying to pierce the dough with a fork to prevent this. I might try that next time if I use this recipe again.

    • — Madeline W. on January 29, 2021
    • Reply
  • Perfect Dough recipe. Light weight, tasty, some tang, and perfect for a fun creative meal. Clear directions too, as always (so appreciated). You can split into 4, for individual pizzas. Use in the oven as described or on the grill. This is a keeper.

    • — Terri H., Berkeley CA on January 28, 2021
    • Reply
  • Years ago, I vowed to never make my own pizza dough after several failed attempts using other recipes… fast forward to quarantine and my family wanted pizza but we weren’t ready to order out. I discovered this recipe and Jen has never failed me before, so I gave this a try and what an amazing recipe. I followed everything the first few times I’ve made this, but recently I’ve reduced the salt to just a teaspoon as I’m trying to lower my sodium intake and it’s still delicious (the toppings also have enough salt to compensate). I don’t think I can ever go back to restaurant pizza again. This dough is quick and easy to make and I make it by hand most of the time if I’m only making one pizza.

    I’ve made pizzas using my own pizza sauce and with the walnut pesto (another favorite recipe on here) as well as my own take on a fuji apple gorgonzola pizza using this dough and it always bakes up well. I have baked on parchment and cookie sheet, with the cornmeal, and on a pizza stone and have had no issues. I also like to brush a little bit of olive oil around the edges for a nice crisp. I recently made a pizza for my sis in law and all she could say was “That pizza, OMG! Not sure how I can just eat one slice!”

    • — Chue Cha on January 28, 2021
    • Reply
  • the best pizza dough we have tried yet, perfect balance of crisp & chewy. a must try!

    • — janice tkach on January 28, 2021
    • Reply
  • This is my go-to pizza dough recipe. I have used it many, many times. Excellent flavor and texture!

    • — Estelle Kratochwill on January 28, 2021
    • Reply
  • This recipe is very easy to follow, as are all once upon a chef’s recipes. Also, clear on how to freeze extra for later. Crust was delicious. Have made it several times.

    • — Kathy Greene on January 28, 2021
    • Reply
  • I love this pizza dough! It’s so fast and I love that I can put one in the freezer for later. I use it to make my version of Margherita pizza.

    • — Mary W on January 28, 2021
    • Reply
  • This is my go to pizza dough recipe. It’s so tasty, quick and easy to prepare. Thank you!

    • — Jackie on January 28, 2021
    • Reply
  • I could never get the pizza dough right until I tried this recipe. Now, according to my family, my homemade pizza resembled the one made in our favourite pizza restaurant which we are not going to anymore due to being stuck at home. Hope this is not because we have forgotten how the restaurant pizza tastes at this point 😀 thanks, Jenn! Love all your recipes

    • — Olga on January 2, 2021
    • Reply
  • Hi! We just tried your pizza dough recipe and it tasted wonderful, but the dough was very dry and had no “stretch” to it whatsoever. (I even added a little more olive oil and a bit of water to try to make it wetter). It wouldn’t roll out either. What do you think I did wrong because I know it was something I probably didn’t calibrate correctly? I left the dough to rise in my oven on “proof” setting , and it did not rise either. Maybe that is a clue as to what went wrong? Thank you!!

    • Hi Megan, sorry you had a problem with the dough! Two questions: was your yeast old or expired? And did you use the spoon and level method for measuring flour? Even a few extra ounces can make a big difference. This article/video explains it nicely.

  • Followed recipe exactly, but made in my bread maker on the dough cycle. The result was excellent. My husband loved it and even enjoyed the leftovers next day.

    I have frozen half and will follow those instructions for cooking in one or two weeks. Can hardly wait and will definitely add a review.

  • Love the simplicity of this recipe and I have made several times. I did find that if I dissolved the yeast in warmer water (110f) first, then added all the other ingredients, I had more success with the dough rising. I also just use a hand blender, as that it all I have, and hand knead for 3-4 minutes.
    Thank you, my go to pizza crust recipe.

    • I’ve made this pizza dough recipes several times and it’s great! Every Friday night is pizza night at our house now. I cut the dough in half when I make it and I freeze the other half for the next week. I use my KitchenAid mixer with the dough hook – it makes it easy! I put a little olive oil on my hands when I am spreading out the dough. Great recipe that is easy to make!

      • — Joan on January 28, 2021
      • Reply
  • Hi! I made this pizza dough tonight. I let it rise in our oven on the proof setting. It really did only take 5 mins to bring together! We cooked it on our grill. The dough was great. Easy to work with. We topped it with a little sauce, mozzarella, onions, red peppers and sausage! It was fabulous! It’s a keeper. We will definitely make it again. I tell everyone about all of your recipes Jenn! I have your cookbook and just love everything!

  • Once upon a time, when I saw yeast on a recipe it sent me running for the hills! The temperature of the water, what if it doesn’t rise, the amount of time it takes, all left me not confident in tackling the ingredient. Not this time! This weekend we made your pizza dough and the margherita pizza and it was absolutely amazing, and just like you said it would rival our favorite pizzeria! This recipe is so really well put together, love the photos, and it was a success! Now I’ll be making this once a month! Thank you for sharing!

  • Hello Jenn, hope you and your family are well.

    Question 1: can the dough be rolled and then frozen or is it best to freeze the dough in balls?

    Question 2: can I make a complete pizza and freeze it unbaked to pull out later?

    Thanks!

    • Hi Ellen, while you could roll out the dough and freeze it, it’s likely to lose its shape a bit when thawing and will need some reshaping (so not sure you’ll save much time there). And while I’ve never done it, I do think you could make a complete pizza and freeze it unbaked. If you do that, I bake it directly from the freezer. Please LMK how it turns out if you try it!

  • Hi Jenn,
    I’m excited to make this recipe and was wondering if I can use the same measurements of flour if I use Caputo’s Pizza flour 00? Thanks!

    • Hi Sarah, I haven’t tried it so can’t say for sure but I think it’s worth a try. I’d follow the measurements in the recipe but add more water or flour if necessary to get to the right consistency (smooth and elastic). I’d love to hear how it turns out if you try it!

  • Hi, Jenn, any thoughts as to if this dough could work for individual grilled pizzas? Thanks!

    • Hi Sue, Without having tried it, it’s really hard to say — I’m sorry I can’t be more helpful! (If you do try it, I’d love to hear how it turns out!)

      • Well, we just tried this… The recipe works beautifully for the individual grilled pizzas. I followed your instructions but then divided into 4 sections. We grilled the first side over medium /medium high heat. Oiled the grill (canola oil) and both sides of the individual pizzas crusts (EVOO). After grilling on the first side we added the toppings and popped them back on to finish. Now I’m making more and will grill the first side and then freeze so I can pull them out, thaw and then finish topping and grilling later this week. Easy dough to work with – thanks as always. 😊 And, it’s mighty good just grilled on both sides and eaten warm! That isn’t helping my supposed low carb diet, though. 😏

        • Thanks so much for reporting back – sounds like they worked out great! I’m sure other readers who are considering grilling them will appreciate your detailed follow-up. 🙂

  • Hi Jenn!

    This is going to be one of the first recipes we try in our new kitchen when it’s done next week! We have a variety of olive oils, some of which are flavoured, and we were wondering if we used one with a garlic or harissa flavour, would that change the texture or would it only add flavour to the crust?

    Happy Canada Day and 4th of July!

    Tina

    • Hi Tina, it shouldn’t change the texture at all — just add a different flavor. Hope you enjoy (and enjoy your new kitchen)!!

    • I really liked this recipe ! The only thing I changed was adding some sugar to my yeast. I only had instant yeast, so I did what was recommended and put it in warm water for ten minutes. I’ve had some issues with my yeast rising recently, so I added about 1.5 teaspoons of sugar to the one cup of water and yeast mixture. It rose super well after that ! I also really enjoyed the idea of baking the pizza for a bit first, and then adding the toppings after. That definitely affected how well it was cooked through, and I’ll be doing it again with my pizza dough to make sure it’s not doughy or undercooked while the top is getting overdone. As a tip, if you have the dough a little thicker it helps to brush the crust will olive oil at the same time you put the toppings on. But, if it’s on the thinner side, it’ll burn, so be cautious. Also, the crumb of the dough was great and a little crumbly, and it had a good taste from the salt and olive oil. I wouldn’t use this recipe if I’m looking for a thicker pizza crust like Sicilian since I don’t think it’s rich enough, but for thinner, ‘regular’ pizza I’m definitely going to make this recipe again !

      • — Vidhi Chadha on January 30, 2021
      • Reply
  • Hi Jenn,
    We tried this and the flavor was really good but we like a very chewy crust. I want it to bend but not snap in half. I got really great bubbles in the crust but they were firm and cracked; I want them to be softer and deflate a little coming out of the oven. How can I tweak the recipe? I thought maybe adding 2 or 3 more tablespoons of oil? I would appreciate any tips because I really like the flavor of this recipe. Thanks Jenn!

    • Hi Turtle, I think adding more oil would actually make the crust crispier, not chewier. If you’re using my baking instructions, when the crust goes in the oven for the first round of baking, I’d cut the baking time in half, leaving it in for about 3 minutes and 30 seconds instead of 7. Hope that helps!

  • Perfect dough. I made it exactly as directed–the pictures and narrative are always such a help on a recipe like this. I’d always made dough in my food processor, so this was a great reason to switch to the KA mixer. Rave reviews from my family! Another keeper! Next time, I’ll double it–with teens, this pizza went fast!!!

  • Hi Jen,
    I’m looking forward to trying this pizza. Would you recommend cooking in a cast iron pan?
    Thank you.
    Jan

    • Sure, Jan – that would work well. Enjoy!

  • I enjoyed the pizza dough, thanks. Since I did not have a use for a second pizza crust, I planned ahead to use the other half for rolls. My topping for the rolls was coarse salt and caraway seeds, a combo I rarely have, but have enjoyed since I was a kid. One crust and a dozen rolls.

    The second time I made the dough, I used the other half rolled very thin for crackers with assorted toppings.

    Very easy and delicious.

    • Actually, this is very similar to my bread recipe, sans sugar, so really glad to hear your idea for buns. It’s always great to have buns in the freezer when I make Jen’s beef and carrot stew. Thanks – Andrea

  • Everything I make of yours has been a hit so far…want to try this pizza dough today. Hungry teenage boys in the house…can this recipe be doubled for 2 large pizzas? Can I make it at one time in the Kitchen Aid and follow your instructions but just divide accordingly?

    • Sure, Jennifer – so long as your KitchenAid is large enough. 🙂

      • Thanks Jenn. After I couldn’t find my dough hook and had to start it with the paddle and finish by hand, I decided to do 2 quick separate batches. Turned out perfectly! Family raved! Now what will I make today…;)

        • Glad it worked out well and that everyone enjoyed! 🙂

    • Perfect pizza dough! I made garlic fingers and pepperoni pizza.. it was delicious. I made pizza dough by hand, it stretched so easily and never broke.
      Your pizza sauce is lovely too!

  • Beautiful supple dough

  • Perfect dough both fresh and out of the fridge a couple of days later.

  • My days of buying a pizza at the grocery store to bake at home have ended with this recipe. It was easy and very good. Since there are only two people in my household, half the dough went into the freezer for a later date. Thanks Jenn!

  • Fantastic and easy! Mine wasn’t quite as beautiful as yours, but tasted great! Made two, one with Italian sausage and onion, one Margarita, with salad. Fed 3 hungry teens, hubby and myself, after mountain bike ride…(barely).

    I look forward to making again!

    Jen, another great recipe, every one delicious! Thank you!

  • Hi Jenn, I don’t have much luck with dough. Either they come out too soft or too hard. But this recipe of yours is such an ease to follow and it was perfect! Thank you for sharing this and will be making more pizza in future!

  • Hello,
    I love your pizza dough recipe!! Do you have any ideas on how to make it gluten free?

    Thanks so much,
    Sasha

    • Hi Sasha, I’ve only made this with all-purpose flour, so I can’t say for sure how it will turn out with gluten-free flour but if you want to give it a try, a lot of readers have commented they have good luck with King Arthur’s Gluten-Free Flour. Please report back if you try it!

  • Great recipe and so simple to make! My husband said it’s the best homemade pizza we’ve ever had. I have never had success with fresh store-bought dough and find it so hard to shape – stretch, shrink, stretch, shrink, ugh. Not this dough! A cinch in the stand mixer, easy to handle and oil/store/remove from a ziplock bag, easy to flatten/stretch/shape – just easy, easy, easy! Do not be intimidated to try this. I will definitely be making this many more times in the future! I especially love that it’s a relatively short rise time, so I can decide to make pizza for dinner late afternoon and still pull it off by evening. Thank you!!!

  • Do you have some tips for using a pizza stone? I have experimented using one with mixed results. The dough sometimes literally melts when placing on a preheated stone (as directions say), and it’s very difficult not to burn hands and fingers. I tried forming the dough on parchment paper and transferring to the stone, but the bottom didn’t crisp up. Thanks!

    • Hi Michele, The best way to transfer the pizza to the stone is to use a cornmeal-dusted pizza peel. I’m not sure why the dough would melt — are you using a traditional pizza dough?

  • I don’t have an electric mixer. Can I still make this dough by hand?

    • Hi Amy, You can definitely knead the dough by hand. Enjoy!

  • Hi Jenn, I want to use your recipe for calzones. How many do you think your recipe make? Thanks so much. Every recipe I have made of yours turns out great, with adjustments for high altitude.

    • — Jarol (Jerrie) E.
    • Reply
    • Hi Jerrie, It depends how big you make them, but I think 4 good-size calzones.

    • Could you please share your high altitude adjustments? Thank you ☺️

  • If I use active dry yeast, as that is what I have on hand, does the amount differ from the amount of rapid-rise yeast that’s listed in the recipe? Your recipe differs somewhat from the recipe we always follow, but because this one is yours, we’re definitely giving it a go! Thanks!

    • Hi Sandra, You would use the same amount of active dry yeast. Hope you enjoy it if you try it!

  • Hi Jenn,
    I made your pizza dough using your instructions exactly. I found that the dough was very dry and dense. I will try adding a bit more water next time. I have been putting my dough in the refrigerator for a few days to rise. I find that 3-5 days makes for a better flavor. Don’t exceed 7 days, as your dough, may go bad. You can smell it if it does.

    Thanks for this alternative dough recipe. I look forward to tasting it. It has more oil and salt than I normally use.

    Love your receipies and your work. Thanks again Jenn.

    • — Henning Mortensen
    • Reply
  • Hi Jenn,
    Hope all is well! We don’t have cornmeal..will that make a difference to the outcome of the dough?

    • Hi Lisa, no, it won’t have an outcome on the dough, but you’ll need to treat the pan to keep it from sticking. You could either coat the pan with parchment paper or a thin layer of oil. Hope that helps!

  • Thank you for the recipe. I have been experimenting with making pizza dough for months, as pizza is my husband’s favorite food and he loves it every Friday night. Unfortunately, we cannot find yeast ANYWHERE. And, I’ve looked for several weeks. I’m fearful of buying it online at Amazon and other sites, because I understand some of the yeasts being shipped are dead/and or not good. On top of that, they are not taking returns of it… We are relegated now to using supermarket pizza dough which is not the same, of course.

    • Should be OK to buy online, and do not accept a no returns policy, in most countries, the goods fall under the sale of goods act. Must be able to be used as described. And Amazon, to be fair are generally pretty good with faulty products.

    • Try Waffle Pantry. I couldn’t find yeast either but they have SAF which is an amazing yeast. It’s not too expensive and shipping was fast.

  • What temperature and for how long?
    Thanks for a response.
    Pieri

    • Hi Pieri, I’m assuming you’re wondering about baking temp and time? If so, refer to either my Margherita or Pesto Pizza recipes. Hope you enjoy if you try one!

  • Hi Jenn! Is it possible to use the food processor for the dough if we don’t have a stand mixer? Thanks!

    • Sure – enjoy!

  • Does this recipe work with gluten free flour?

    • Hi Peggy, I’ve only made this with all-purpose flour, so I’m not certain it will work with gluten-free flour — I’m sorry! If you do try it, please LMK how it turns out!

  • Can you please post directions for those of us without a Kitchen Aid?
    Can this be done in a food processor?

    • Yes, you can use a food processor for the dough. 🙂

  • I appreciate the detailed instructions in this recipe for how to make the dough ahead and save it until the next day. I’ve heard that making the dough ahead gives it a better flavor and texture but didn’t know the best way to do it. I’ve been making pizza dough for years, but yours has more salt and oil than I normally use so I look forward to trying this recipe!

    • Hope you enjoy!

  • I make so many of your recipes GF with great success. Do you think this would work?? 🤞🏻

    • — Samantha Lueken
    • Reply
    • Hi, Samantha, I’ve only made this with all-purpose flour, so I can’t say for sure how it will work with gluten-free — I’m sorry! I’d love to hear how it turns out if you try it!

    • Hi Jen,
      I couldn’t find rapid rise yeast. Would active dry yeast work? If yes, how much?

      • Sure, however the dough will take longer to rise. To give it a boost, you can dissolve it in the warm water and let it sit until frothy, about 10 minutes. Following that, add it to the mixing bowl with the flour, oil, and salt and proceed with the recipe. Enjoy!

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