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Broiled Asian-Style Flat Iron Steak

5 stars based on 27 votes

Flat iron steak is one of my favorite cuts of beef for home cooking. It’s similar to flank or skirt steak, only much more tender — in fact, after the tenderloin, it’s the second most tender cut. Plus, it’s cheap. Here, I’ve broiled it and topped it with a rich Asian-style brown sauce. With buttered rice and a steamed vegetable, it’s an easy and elegant dinner that you can have on the table in under 30 minutes.

ingredients

The recipe calls for a 2-pound flat iron steak; if you can’t find a large one, it’s fine to use two smaller steaks. (Note: it is sometimes called a petite tender or top blade steak.) As you can see, it’s uniform in thickness and rectangular in shape, which makes it perfect for grilling or broiling. Feel free to grill it, if you like.

ginger

Begin by prepping the ginger. Simply peel off the skin, then slice thin. Cut the slices into strips, gather the strips together and then slice again in the other direction to finely chop.

Start the sauce by sautéing the ginger in a sauce pan with a bit of oil.

sauteing-ginger

Add the garlic — I use a garlic press to mince it right into the pan — and cook a minute more. Do not brown.

adding-garlic

Add the dry Sherry, soy sauce, brown sugar, tomato paste and water and simmer for 8-10 minutes, or until just slightly thickened.

simmering-sauce

Stir the sesame oil and butter, then set aside.

stirring-in-butter

Place the steak on a broiler pan or rack over a baking sheet and season with salt and pepper.

ready-to-broil

Broil to desired doneness — about 5 minutes per side for medium rare — then cover with foil and let stand for about ten minutes. It’s very important to let the meat rest; if you cut it immediately, all the juices will gush out of the steak.

slicing-steak

Cut the steak into thin slices across the grain. Serve with the brown sauce and enjoy!

Asian-Flat-Iron-Steak

Broiled Asian-Style Flat Iron Steak

Servings: 4
Prep Time: 10 Minutes
Cook Time: 20 Minutes
Total Time: 30 Minutes

Ingredients

For the Sauce

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable or peanut oil
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 cup dry Sherry
  • 1/3 cup soy sauce (use gluten-free if needed)
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1/4 cup light brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon Asian sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter

For the Steak

  • 1 (1.75-2 pound) Flat Iron Steak
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

Instructions

  1. Preheat the broiler and set an oven rack in the top position.
  2. Heat the oil in a small saucepan over medium heat. Add the ginger and cook until softened and fragrant, a few minutes. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute more. Do not brown. Add the dry Sherry, soy sauce, tomato paste, brown sugar and water; bring to a boil, then turn the heat down and simmer gently until just slightly thickened, 8-10 minutes. Add the sesame oil and butter and stir until the butter is melted. Set aside.
  3. Season the steak on both sides with salt and pepper and place on a broiler pan (or rack on top of a baking sheet). Broil the steak to desired doneness, about 5 minutes per side for medium-rare. Using tongs, transfer the steak to a cutting board; cover with foil and let rest for 10 minutes to let the juices settle (don't rush this step or the juices will gush out of the steak when you cut it). Cut the steak into thin slices across the grain and serve with the sauce.

Nutrition Information

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  • Per serving (4 servings)
  • Calories: 483
  • Fat: 24g
  • Saturated fat: 10g
  • Carbohydrates: 19g
  • Sugar: 15g
  • Fiber: 1g
  • Protein: 45g
  • Sodium: 2019mg
  • Cholesterol: 152mg

Reviews & Comments

  • I purchased a 2.75 lb. flank steak by mistake. I know this cut is quite a bit tougher than flat iron would it still work? If not can you recommend another of your recipes in which I could use it? I had planned on using half for this recipe and half for the beef and broccoli – which my family loves and asks for all the time!!!

    - Vikki L. on July 30, 2017 Reply
    • It will work just fine, Vikki. Enjoy!

      - Jenn on July 30, 2017 Reply
  • Could you use a London Broil cut for this or would that be too tough? If too tough, could the sauce be used as a marinade?

    - Bonnie on June 15, 2017 Reply
    • Hi Bonnie, Yes, it’s fine to use London broil but the sauce cannot be used as a marinade. Enjoy!

      - Jenn on June 18, 2017 Reply
  • 5 stars

    Thank you for the prompt reply to my query about the dry sherry. I don’t know how you manage everything! I bought the dry sherry and made this tonight, and my husband was having seconds and said, “This is just terrific! Really delicious!” I agreed, and was pleased that it was simple, too. Thank you so much! We’ll enjoy it again soon. (And I spent some time this morning making your turkey-spinach meatballs. They are in the freezer waiting for arrival of our kids and grandkids next week. They will vanish in no time!)

    - Judy on June 12, 2017 Reply
  • I should also have asked if there are good substitutes for dry sherry, or if you have other recipes that use it.

    - Judy on June 11, 2017 Reply
    • There are several recipes on the site that call for sherry; a couple of which are Beef with broccoli and Oven Baby Back Ribs. Sherry has a pretty distinct taste but if you’d prefer not to buy it, you could try substituting a dry white wine, Chinese rice wine or chicken stock (for a non-alcohol option). Hope that helps!

      - Jenn on June 11, 2017 Reply
  • Does dry sherry keep? And if so, how do you keep it? And for how long will it keep? I suspect we will want to make this recipe again, so I am willing to buy a bottle to try this recipe.

    - Judy on June 11, 2017 Reply
    • Hi Judy, For cooking purposes, you can probably keep a bottle for up to a year. Store sherry in a cool, dark place (the fridge is okay too), preferably upright to minimize the contact area with the air inside the bottle.

      - Jenn on June 11, 2017 Reply
  • 5 stars

    This dish was excellent. I got alot more comfortable making rarer steak with this dish and it has improved my life. I like the recipe as is served with rice and asparagus

    - Benjamin E Deonovic on December 1, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    I have recently fallen in love with flat-iron steak and your Asian sauce for this is outstanding. I could eat it with a spoon. I have passed on the recipe to family members too.

    - Sally Baldwin on December 1, 2016 Reply
  • LOVED this steak and sauce! It is packed with flavor and so simple to prepare. I had only used flat iron steak in chili before and thought it had to cook for hours to get tender. What an injustice to this wonderful steak! Just finished this for dinner and can’t wait to make it again. Thanks Jen!

    - Grace on November 7, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    This was delicious! The butcher said that in November this cut was not on the shelf, but he had enough on hand. It cooked perfectly at 5 min per side.
    A guest had a garlic allergy, so I did not add garlic; I have to keep to minimum sugars, so I subbed a little honey for the brown sugar. The sauce was lovely.

    - Jane Derickson on November 7, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    Soooo good! I made the sauce from memory, so might have been slightly different, but thanks for the inspiration. Definitely making again. And flat iron is my favorite steak!! Anytime the grocery store has a deal on it, I stock up.

    - Natalie Bennett on November 2, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    Hi Jen, thank you for sharing all your yummy recipes. I’ve tried many of them and it’s husband approved. I served this one last night and our guest loved it. The yummiest steak we ever had.

    - Joy on October 25, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    Wow! This was really yummy! I didn’t have dry sherry, so I took another reviewer’s suggestion and used sake. I couldn’t find “flat iron steak” but a butcher told me I could get a blade roast and cut it in half. Just remove the membrane in the middle and that’s the same thing as the flat iron steak. The hubs was impressed and requested I make it again. Five stars!! (And thanks so much for the recipes, I’m new to the site and I love it!!)

    - Laura Lee on September 18, 2016 Reply
  • Just a quick question. Are you using toasted sesame oil or plain? I find they have a totally different flavor. Love all your recipes.

    - Sherry Atwood on May 27, 2016 Reply
    • Just regular sesame oil. Hope you enjoy!

      - Jenn on May 27, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    I made this for the first time tonight and everyone loved it! The kids said “yummy!!” as they smothered their beef in it. I prepared steamed broccoli as a side vegetable and that too got smothered in the sauce.
    I didn’t have sherry so used Japanese sake and it turned out just fine.
    Thank you for another tasty recipe that was quick and easy to prepare!

    - Ponyo on February 6, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    Just had this for dinner; let me first say that we are steak lovers and had never had flat iron because grocery stores in our remote area of NH don’t carry it– it was incredible. Looks like I’ll be traveling for beef! The sauce was amazing, I literally drank it out of the pot. Props Jenn, another amazing recipe! Thank you!

    - Erin on February 3, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    Jenn,
    This is a fantastic, easy and well-appreciated recipe. I thought I made enough for leftovers. Sadly, (or gladly!) there were none!

    I appreciate your step-by-step, this-is-what-it-should-look-like pictures! Very helpful for the cooking-challenged side of the family!

    Recipe is printed and added to the UOAC folder!

    - Shani Spiegle on December 14, 2015 Reply
  • How far in advance can the sauce be prepared prior to serving. Can I make it at home to bring it to a dinner party to reheat on their stove and cook the steak there? If so, how should it be stored between preparing and serving? Thanks!

    - Kelly on November 16, 2015 Reply
    • Hi Kelly, You can definitely make it ahead and store in tupperware. Thin it with a bit of water if necessary when you reheat it.

      - Jenn on November 16, 2015 Reply
  • 2 stars

    I found this to be a bit bland. It was good, but not great. I will not be making it again. Disappointed!

    - Cheryl on November 8, 2015 Reply
  • 5 stars

    Yum. Yum. Yum. Easy to make. Incredible flavor. And a really practical cut of beef.

    - Karen on October 3, 2015 Reply
  • 5 stars

    This was very tasty and so easy to make! My 7 yr. old son (a picky eater) had seconds and my husband wants to add it to our regularly-prepared meals. We can’t wait to try more of your recipes!

    - Stacy Long on June 14, 2015 Reply
  • Hello Jen
    I am new to cooking steak and never done it before
    Trying this recipe for hubby but I got a T-bone and rib eye steak
    Can I still broil that cut of meat and if yes for how long?

    Thanks for the great website /I have tried a few recipes and they all turn out perfect especially the bulgur salad yum:)

    - zehra on May 14, 2015 Reply
  • 5 stars

    This is the best terryaki-like sauce I’ve ever had. I loved it on the steak and I loved it even more on my salad!! I’m keeping the sauce recipe for an Asian salad dressing. Better than any store bought!! Big time thanks Jen!!

    - Rachel on March 26, 2015 Reply
  • 5 stars

    In ref. to Broiled Asian-Style Flat Iron, I didn`t have a flat-iron steak, but had several filot mignon, so used those instead and made the sauce exactly. OMG, that was so delicious and so very very good. Will try the flat-iron next time, but do have a question, isn`t a flat-iron like a brisket? and if so isn`t it tough? Sorry not too sure about different cuts of meat. Thank for the advice.

    - Pauline on March 21, 2015 Reply
    • Hi Pauline, Glad you enjoyed. Flat iron is not like a brisket at all — it’s a very tender, quick-cooking cut. Try it, it is much less expensive than filet and almost just as tender. I promise you will not be disappointed!

      - Jenn on March 22, 2015 Reply
  • 5 stars

    I tried my first recipe “Asian Flat Iron Steak along with the green beans and rice” from your website today for lunch. Highest ratings from all of my family-a tough crowd indeed….thank you for making me look good! Can’t wait to try another one of your amazing recipes.

    - SaharMarin on February 17, 2015 Reply
  • If you’re cooking one just a little thinner than the one shown and like it medium rare, would the cooking time still be 5 minutes per side? We’re trying this out tonight with your stir-fry szechuan green beans & mushrooms!!

    - Kelly on January 25, 2015 Reply
    • Hi Kelly, It’s hard to say without seeing it, but you could always try 4 minutes per side and flash it back under the broiler if it’s still undercooked. Hope you enjoy it!

      - Jenn on January 25, 2015 Reply
  • 5 stars

    The flat iron steak is an easy hit. Jenn’s recipes are so reliable that you can confidently experiment on company. I made this for guests and it was easy to do and still visit. I broiled it in the oven and served it with steamed broccoli and Jenn’s Jasmine rice.The sauce is so fast and so tasty! It is also great drizzled over the rice. Delicious!

    - Julie E. on December 6, 2014 Reply
  • I was wondering if i should set my oven to broil high or low? I was thinking high but i just wanted to make sure. =^_^= Thanks!

    - crystal on December 4, 2014 Reply
    • Hi Crystal, Yes, high is correct 🙂

      - Jenn on December 4, 2014 Reply
  • 5 stars

    This recipe was a great introduction for us to the flat iron steak. We decided to grill instead of broil, but otherwise followed directions as stated. The steak was very tender and so delicious with the sauce. We served with rice and steamed broccoli as suggested. This easy and quick recipe will go into our regular rotation as we are now big fans of this cut.

    - Liesel on December 4, 2014 Reply
  • 5 stars

    the broiled asian flank steak was quick and easy – and the sauce was amazing

    - Joe De Maio on December 3, 2014 Reply
  • 5 stars

    This is a fantastic recipe! I have made it several times now as it as become a staple in our house and I am the cook. Jenn, you are correct in that the flat iron steak is more tender than the flank steak. However both are very good because the sauce is terrific and really adds some pizazz to the dish. Your recipes are outstanding and I thank you for providing them to home chefs like myself. Cheers !

    - Jim Ryan on December 3, 2014 Reply
  • 5 stars

    I stumbled onto your website today. What a great find!
    Cooked this tonight. Delicious! I didn’t have sherry so I used 2 tbsp of Port.
    I will be trying more of your recipes asap.
    Love the photo of ingredients that you post.

    - Tina on September 29, 2014 Reply
    • Welcome to the site, Tina! So glad you enjoyed 🙂

      - Jenn on October 1, 2014 Reply
  • 4 stars

    Hi, finally got round to trying the flat iron steak last night. I found the flavour really great but they were a little tougher than I was expecting. I cooked mine in a smoking hot pan as I was worried that grilling (broiling) would lose some of the lovely juices. Luckily I have a few more in the fridge to experiment on.

    - Lee on September 19, 2014 Reply
  • Hi Jenn, I love your recipes. I wanted to know if there was something I could use in place of the sesame oil. My son is allergic to sesame.

    - Melissa on September 16, 2014 Reply
    • Hi Melissa, Thank you! It is absolutely fine to just leave the sesame oil out; the sauce will still be delicious.

      - Jenn on September 17, 2014 Reply
  • 5 stars

    We had this dinner last night. It was ABSOLUTELY delicious. I wouldn’t change a thing. I am so glad I stumbled upon your website, Jenn! I’ve tried only a couple of dishes but they all have been perfect and my family feels like they are eating at some fancy restaurant at home! Please keep sharing your talent with us. Thanks!!!!!

    - Maribel on September 10, 2014 Reply
  • 5 stars

    This is sooo good. Made it for dinner tonight, the family loved it. I’m always looking for good sauces, this one is perfect.

    - Betty Blair on September 9, 2014 Reply
  • 5 stars

    I am in love with this recipe, especially the sauce! I followed the recipe exactly, and would not change a thing. Pairing this delicious cut of meat, thank you for the introduction, with some buttery rice and steamed green beans like you suggested were perfection as well. We will be having this on our dinner table many times to come. Thank you!

    - Katie on September 9, 2014 Reply
    • Thank you for being the first to review, Katie. So glad you enjoyed it!

      - Jenn on September 9, 2014 Reply
  • Hi Jenn. Is a flat iron steak the same thing as a flank steak? If not could I substitute a flank steak in this recipe?

    - Jackie on September 9, 2014 Reply
    • Hi Jackie, It’s similar but not the same. Flat iron steak is much more tender, but flank would work well too.

      - Jenn on September 9, 2014 Reply
  • Hi Jenn,
    Are there any substitutes for the Sherry that you could recommend?

    - Julie Geffre on September 9, 2014 Reply
    • Hi Julie, Sherry has a very distinct taste but you could try a dry white wine, Chinese rice wine or chicken stock (for a non-alcohol option).

      - Jenn on September 9, 2014 Reply
      • 5 stars

        How about Madeira or Marsala as a substitute for sherry?

        - Laverne on October 19, 2014 Reply
        • Hi Laverne, Sherry is used in this recipe as a substitute for Chinese Rice Wine, which can be hard to find (Dry Sherry is similar in flavor to Chinese Rice Wine). Madeira or Marsala will work, but the flavor will be different. Hope that helps!

          - Jenn on October 20, 2014 Reply
          • How about using Mirin instead of the sherry?

            - Leanne on October 20, 2014
          • Hi Leanne, It would work but the end result would be different — mirin is sweet while sherry is dry.

            - Jenn on October 21, 2014

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