Creamy Make-Ahead Mashed Potatoes

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Perfect for the busy holidays, these ultra-creamy make-ahead mashed potatoes can be prepared two days ahead of time and reheated in the microwave.

Much as my family loves mashed potatoes with pools of melted butter and gravy on Thanksgiving, I’m always reluctant to make them because they’re difficult to make ahead. I don’t know about you, but to me, the thought of frantically mashing potatoes at the last minute (while trying to get a dozen other hot dishes on the table, with guests of all ages milling around the kitchen) is nerve-wracking.

That’s why I was thrilled to recently discover on Cooks Illustrated a method for make-ahead mashed potatoes that works really well. Not only are the mashed potatoes ultra-creamy, but they can also be made two days ahead of time and reheated in the microwave — a huge bonus when oven and burner space is at a premium during the holidays.

What you’ll need for make-ahead mashed potatoes

make ahead mashed potatoes

Interestingly, the recipe calls for baking the potatoes instead of boiling them. In all my years of cooking, I have never seen a mashed potato recipe that starts with baked potatoes. But it makes sense: water is the enemy of perfectly mashed potatoes. If the potatoes are too wet, they become dense and heavy. (That’s why most recipes instruct you to “dry” the boiled potatoes on the stovetop before adding the butter and liquid.)

Baking the potatoes does take longer but it’s a tradeoff: you don’t have to peel or dry the potatoes and it’s completely hands-off. And since the potatoes cook directly on the oven rack, you won’t even dirty a pan!

How To Make Make-Ahead Mashed Potatoes

make ahead mashed potatoes

To begin, place the potatoes directly on an oven rack and bake until very soft, 50 to 60 minutes. While the potatoes are still hot, cut each in potato in half lengthwise. Scoop out all of the flesh from each potato half into the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (or the bowl of an electric mixer). Break the cooked potato flesh down into small pieces using a fork, potato masher, or rubber spatula.

make ahead mashed potatoes

Beat on low speed until completely smooth and no lumps remain, stopping the mixer to scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl as needed. It’s important to do this while the potatoes are still hot; otherwise you’ll end up with lumps.

make ahead mashed potatoes

Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, bring the cream and butter to a simmer.

Remove the bowl from the mixer. Using a large rubber spatula, gradually fold in the hot cream and butter mixture. Folding (rather than stirring in the stand mixer) prevents the potatoes from becoming gluey.

make ahead mashed potatoes

It will take a few minutes to mix the liquid in; keep folding until the potatoes are smooth and creamy. Mix in the salt, then taste and adjust seasoning, if necessary.

make ahead mashed potatoes

Transfer the mashed potatoes to a large microwave-safe bowl and cover tightly with plastic wrap. Refrigerate for up to 2 days. To reheat, poke lots of holes in the plastic wrap with the tip of a knife and microwave at medium-high (75 percent) power for about 14 minutes. Stir the potatoes halfway through reheating to be sure they warm evenly. Season to taste, then transfer the potatoes to a serving bowl. Top with the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter and the chives and serve warm.

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Creamy Make-Ahead Mashed Potatoes

Perfect for the busy holidays, these ultra-creamy make-ahead mashed potatoes can be prepared two days ahead of time and reheated in the microwave.

Servings: 8

Ingredients

  • 3-1/2 pounds Russet potatoes
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 8 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons salt
  • Chives, for serving

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 450°F and adjust an oven rack to the middle position.
  2. Place the potatoes directly on the oven rack (alternatively, you can place them on a wire rack set in a rimmed baking sheet). Bake until very soft, 50 to 60 minutes, depending on the size of the potatoes. (Err on the side of overcooking rather than undercooking them.)
  3. Remove the potatoes from the oven. While they are still hot, cut each potato in half lengthwise. Using an oven mitt or a folded kitchen towel to hold the hot potatoes, scoop out all of the flesh from each potato half into the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (*see note below on using a potato ricer, food mill or hand-held electric mixer). The flesh near the skin gets a little tough, so be sure to leave it behind. Break the cooked potato flesh down into small pieces using a potato masher, fork, or rubber spatula. Beat on low speed until completely smooth and no lumps remain, 1 to 2 minutes, stopping the mixer to scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl as needed.
  4. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan over medium heat, bring the cream and 6 tablespoons of the butter to a simmer.
  5. Remove the bowl from the mixer stand and, using a large rubber spatula, gradually fold in the hot cream and butter mixture. It will take a few minutes to mix it all in; keep folding until the potatoes are smooth and creamy. Stir in the salt, then taste and adjust seasoning, if necessary. Transfer the mashed potatoes to a large microwave-safe bowl and cover tightly with plastic wrap (the bowl should be large enough that the potatoes don’t touch the plastic wrap). Refrigerate for up to 2 days. (DO NOT FREEZE)
  6. To reheat, use the tip of a knife to poke about 10 holes in the plastic wrap, and microwave at medium-high (75 percent) power until the potatoes are hot, about 14 minutes, stirring halfway through the reheating time. Taste and adjust seasoning, if necessary. Transfer the mashed potatoes to a serving dish, top with the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter, and sprinkle with the chives. Serve hot.
  7. Notes: For perfectly smooth potatoes, pass the potato flesh through a potato ricer or food mill before adding them to the mixer. If you don't have a stand mixer, you can use a hand-held electric mixer. If you don't have an electric mixer, pass the potatoes through a food mill or potato ricer and then whip by hand with a wooden spoon.

Nutrition Information

Powered by Edamam

  • Per serving (8 servings)
  • Calories: 464
  • Fat: 34 g
  • Saturated fat: 21 g
  • Carbohydrates: 38 g
  • Sugar: 3 g
  • Fiber: 3 g
  • Protein: 6 g
  • Sodium: 470 mg
  • Cholesterol: 112 mg

This website is written and produced for informational purposes only. I am not a certified nutritionist and the nutritional data on this site has not been evaluated or approved by a nutritionist or the Food and Drug Administration. Nutritional information is offered as a courtesy and should not be construed as a guarantee. The data is calculated through an online nutritional calculator, Edamam.com. Although I do my best to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates only. Varying factors such as product types or brands purchased, natural fluctuations in fresh produce, and the way ingredients are processed change the effective nutritional information in any given recipe. Furthermore, different online calculators provide different results depending on their own nutrition fact sources and algorithms. To obtain the most accurate nutritional information in a given recipe, you should calculate the nutritional information with the actual ingredients used in your recipe, using your preferred nutrition calculator.

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Reviews & Comments

  • I just have to say thank you, thank you for this delicious recipe. I needed to have a make ahead recipe for potatoes and thought I’d give these a try. I made 8 lbs of russets for Thanksgiving. Used about 2 1/2 cups of cream and two sticks of butter. Mashed and rewarmed in the oven after the turkey came out. They were such a huge hit!
    This will always be my go to for mashed potatoes.

    • — Lau on November 26, 2020
    • Reply
  • These were amazing! I made them a day ahead following the recipe. They were so easy. I rewarmed them in the oven with other sides while my turkey was resting. These would be elegant with steaks or a nice roast too. Thank you for this recipe!

    • — SHANNON on November 26, 2020
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  • Finally! A perfect mashed potato recipe I can make ahead. Made it for Thanksgiving and it came out great! Thank you for this game changer of a recipe.

    • — Elizabeth on November 26, 2020
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  • Delicious! Made them for Thanksgiving the day before and it was so nice to just warm them up and serve. My new mashed potato recipe! I followed exact recipe and perfect. I smeared a little butter and sprinkled parmesan cheese on the potato skins and made a snack out of them. Thanks so much.

    • — Alli on November 26, 2020
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  • These were fantastic-I will never peel potatoes again!

    • — Tammy on November 26, 2020
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  • Best mashed potatoes! Followed the instructions as written and turned out perfectly!

    • — Lolly S. on November 26, 2020
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  • This turned out really well. Great taste, wonderful texture. I thought it was going to be soupy and kept stirring. I must say, Ms. Segal, every recipe of yours I have cooked has been delicious!

    • — Bob from Tennessee on November 26, 2020
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  • Should you take the potatoes out of fridge ahead of time so the are not so cold?

    • — Charlotte Ann Haney on November 26, 2020
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    • You really don’t need to. You can microwave them straight from the fridge. Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 26, 2020
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  • I made these last night and would rather reheat in the oven vs microwave. What temp and time should I use for the oven?

    • — Stacy on November 26, 2020
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    • Sure, you can reheat them in a conventional oven at 350°F, covered with foil, for 30-40 min (stirring once halfway through) or until warm. Enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 26, 2020
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  • I made the recipe last night as directed. When I added my cream/butter mixture is was very soupy. I wasn’t able to fold the mixture in as it seemed as though I had a lot of liquid and little potatoes. Can my potatoes be saved in time for tonight’s dinner?

    • — Jeanne McCarthy on November 26, 2020
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    • Hi Jeanne, It takes a while to incorporate the cream into the potatoes. Did it work out?

      • — Jenn on November 26, 2020
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      • No it didn’t work out. I tasted it this morning and all I could taste was the cream. I’m not sure where to go from here. Any suggestions?

        • — Jeanne McCarthy on November 26, 2020
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        • Oh no, I’m so sorry! I think the only remedy would be to add more potatoes.

          • — Jenn on November 26, 2020
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      • Oh my gosh these were delish. It was such a relief to have them done and they heated up nicely. I did not read the reviews before I made them yesterday about not using milk. I did use whole milk and cream and they were just so yummy and so easy. Thanks so much. Will use cream next time👍

        • — Barb Burkham on November 26, 2020
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  • I really dislike peeling, dicing and boiling potatoes, which is one of the reasons I only make mashed potatoes once a year, ha. This method is a game-changer! I will never make mashed potatoes the old way again. Thanks, and Happy Thanksgiving!

    (I will say, I did use cream but also added a little whole milk, and I thought it turned out well.)

    • — keisha on November 25, 2020
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  • Can the potatoes be cooked in the microwave instead of the oven?

    • — Candice on November 25, 2020
    • Reply
    • Yes that’ll work.

      • — Jenn on November 25, 2020
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  • Oh my gosh! The best homemade potatoes I’ve ever made! No Peeling? Yes please! I cannot wait for my guests to try them!

    • — Nancy G on November 25, 2020
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  • Do you think I could use half and half rather than cream? I didn’t think to buy heavy cream this year. Thank you!

    • — Briana on November 25, 2020
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    • I don’t recommend it, Briana. I’m sorry!

      • — Jenn on November 25, 2020
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    • I just used half n half (all we had) and the texture is awesome and they taste delicious. But used a little over a cup vs 1.5 cups. Still haven’t put em in the oven to finalize (can’t do microwave), so I’m not sure about the final product. But so far so good!

      • — Kelsey on November 26, 2020
      • Reply
      • I substituted half and half and these are still terrific!

        • — Jean Lindsay on December 24, 2020
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  • Ugh! I didn’t mix the potatoes when they were hot — like you said to do! They were very lumpy. However, they tasted great.

    • — Mari Darnell on November 25, 2020
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  • Absolutely delicious!! I’m making these again for the second thanksgiving in a row. I highly recommend using a potato ricer, it makes a big difference. Love that this can be made the night before too!

    • — Darby on November 25, 2020
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  • I cannot believe how delicious these potatoes are! I just made these and my husband and I agree, these aren’t just the best potatoes we’ve ever had, they rank in the top 5 foods we’ve ever had. I doubled everything, however I did stop at about 3 cups of the cream and butter mixture to get the perfect consistency.

    You have ruined every other potato recipe for us! Thank you!!

    • — Rachael on November 25, 2020
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  • Mine unfortunately came out like glue. Great taste but gummy and not at all creamy. I think my mistake was not scooping out the inside of the potato while they were hot. I got sidetracked (kids) and didn’t scoop the flesh until the potatoes were almost cooled off. My husband and kids liked the flavor, and it’s just us this holiday, so I’ll try again next time

    • — Shawn on November 25, 2020
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  • Fantastic mashed potatoes, so easy and so delicious! I made them a day ahead of time for T-Day and had to taste them. The best I’ve ever made so thank you for helping me look like a good cook.

    • — Susan M on November 25, 2020
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  • A little bummed on this one. Putting the potatoes in the mixer ended up making them gluey. I so I wish I had just mashed them by hand. I had to add sour cream as well. They’re not bad, but I wouldn’t do it again.

    • — Audrey on November 25, 2020
    • Reply
  • Can roasted garlic be added to these potatoes, or would it change the texture or the way they reheat? Thanks in advance!

    • — Karly on November 25, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Karly, I think it would work nicely. Please let me know how it turns out!

      • — Jenn on November 25, 2020
      • Reply
  • Can I use whole milk instead of heavy cream??

    • — Laura on November 25, 2020
    • Reply
    • I wouldn’t recommend it – sorry!

      • — Jenn on November 25, 2020
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  • Hi! I made these last night and will need to add extra cream before serving. They’re more scoopable than creamy and able to stir. Any suggestions on the best way? I want to avoid them getting gummy. Thanks! On to your sausage stuffing now 🙂

    • — Janette Carle on November 25, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Janette, I’d warm them up halfway, fold in the additional cream (being careful not to overmix), then finish warming them.

      • — Jenn on November 25, 2020
      • Reply
      • Thanks!

        • — Janette on November 25, 2020
        • Reply
  • I suggest wrapping in foil before you bake, i had a potato explode and now my freshly cleaned oven is a giant mess.

    • — jw on November 25, 2020
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    • A helpful tip, if you pierce the potatoes they won’t explode. As the potato cooks, the steam builds up inside and the pressure is more than the skin can hold causing it to break open and explode. To prevent it in the future be sure to vigorously stab your potatoes multiple times with a knife or fork.

      • — CrestedInk on November 25, 2020
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  • This is my go-to Thanksgiving day mashed potato recipe. Restaurant quality.

    • — Bridget on November 24, 2020
    • Reply
  • Can I use milk instead of heavy cream?

    • — Camille on November 24, 2020
    • Reply
    • I wouldn’t recommend it — sorry!

      • — Jenn on November 25, 2020
      • Reply
  • Can I use salted butter?

    • — Kerry on November 24, 2020
    • Reply
    • Yes, while it varies by brand, most salted butter has approximately 1/4 tsp. salt per stick, so you can use the salted butter and reduce the salt in the recipe as needed. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on November 25, 2020
      • Reply
  • Can I use Eastern potatoes instead of Russet?

    • — Mary Hendrickson on November 24, 2020
    • Reply
    • For the best results, I’d stick to Russets here — sorry!

      • — Jenn on November 24, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi,
    Can I use salted butter instead of unsalted and cut back on the salt added?

    • — Kathy Sikma on November 24, 2020
    • Reply
    • Yes, While it varies by brand, most salted butter has approximately 1/4 tsp. salt per stick, so you can use the salted butter and reduce the salt in the recipe as needed. Hope that helps and that you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 24, 2020
      • Reply
  • I would like to make these potatoes for Thanksgiving, but ny microwave can only be set at either 70% or 80%. Which do you suggest?

    • — Linda on November 24, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Linda, I’d go with 70%. Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 24, 2020
      • Reply
    • Do you know the amount of the ingredients to use if making the whole 5lb bag of potatoes?

      • — Cindy Taylor on November 24, 2020
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      • I don’t and Math is not my strong suit but I think you’d need to increase other ingredients by about 1/3.

        • — Jenn on November 25, 2020
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        • This is not anything I would ever make again. I have been making mashed potatoes for 60 years and these were an absolute embarrassment. Fortunately, I baked an entire 5 lb bag of potatoes and had some I could add at the end to try to improve the gooey, labor intensive, wasteful mess. Only redeeming thing was the leftover skins I can now fill with good newly made mashed potatoes and toppings. I suggest you modify your recipe to indicate the size of the potatoes you use, as well as the number of expected servings for average sized adults. People using a 5lb bag of smallish potatoes end up with about half the servings normally obtained when potatoes are peeled, and boiled before mashing.

          • — Vicki on November 25, 2020
          • Reply
  • I usually add nutmeg to my Thanksgiving potatoes. When is the best time to do that?

    • — Jodi on November 23, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Jodi, I’d add with the salt. Enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 23, 2020
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  • These will forever be my go to mashed potato recipe. They are delicious!! So creamy and perfectly salted. Thanks so much for your recipes Jen! I have loved every recipe from your cookbook and blog

    • — Ali Yoder on November 22, 2020
    • Reply
  • I don’t have a stand mixer. Can I use a regular hand mixer in a large bowl? Or hand mash them?

    • — KS on November 21, 2020
    • Reply
    • A hand mixer will work fine, KS. Enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 22, 2020
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    • I made these for the first time last Thanksgiving and they were perfect. So much easier to make ahead and reheat. Taste was great and everyone raved about how good they were.

      • — Judy on November 23, 2020
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  • Hi! My stand mixer only has beater and the hooks… will the hooks work? I don’t have a mill or ricer, I do have a food processor but that didn’t sound like it was turning out as well…
    I LOVE your recipes!!!

    • — Jamie Ferrandi on November 21, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Jamie, When you say beater, do you mean the paddle or the whisk?

      • — Jenn on November 22, 2020
      • Reply
  • I have used this recipe for the last 3 years. This is hands-down the best mashed potatoes and the EASIEST recipe I have ever followed. It is a complete no-brainer to use for any major holiday or if you just love mashed potatoes. I absolutely LOVE LOVE that you can make it 2 days in advance because I am the one always hosting. It saves me so much time. Thank you!!

    • — Faith on November 21, 2020
    • Reply
  • Would Yukon gold potatoes work the same in this recipe?

    • — Tara on November 21, 2020
    • Reply
    • I don’t recommend it, Tara – sorry!

      • — Jenn on November 22, 2020
      • Reply
      • I usually add grated Parmesan to my potatoes. Would this work with this format? If so, when should I add it? Thanks!

        • — Kristen on December 22, 2020
        • Reply
        • Sure, but I’d wait until you reheat them to add it. Hope you enjoy!

          • — Jenn on December 22, 2020
          • Reply
    • Can I use creme fraiche instead of heavy cream?

      • — Mary on November 25, 2020
      • Reply
      • Hi Mary, I haven’t tried it so I can’t say for sure. This recipe is a bit finicky so not sure I’d risk on Thanksgiving. Sorry!

        • — Jenn on November 25, 2020
        • Reply
  • What if I use a ricer rather than a stand mixer? The recipe refers to a note but I didn’t see one.
    Thanks very much!

    • — Donna Whalen Robinson on November 19, 2020
    • Reply
    • A ricer works great here! And the Note is at the very bottom of the recipe right above the nutritional info. Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 20, 2020
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  • Baked potato recipes always include “poke holes in the skin with tines of a fork” so potatoes don’t steam.

    Is this not needed?

    • — Rob Cotter on November 19, 2020
    • Reply
    • No- not necessary- hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 20, 2020
      • Reply
  • Can these be reheated on warm in a crockpot instead of oven? Or on low?

    • — Kristy on November 19, 2020
    • Reply
    • I haven’t reheated these in a crockpot (I don’t have a crockpot), but I think it would work. Maybe I’d get them up to the temperature you want on the warm setting and then switch it to low. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on November 20, 2020
      • Reply
  • Can I substitute a lower fat lactose free milk?

    • — Pat on November 18, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Pat, I wouldn’t recommend it — sorry! If you have a problem with dairy, you may want to give a dairy-free alternative a try. Some readers have commented that they’ve used Rich’s non-dairy coffee creamer (frozen) and Trader Joe’s unflavored non-dairy creamer for recipes that call for heavy cream. (Please keep in mind that I haven’t tried it with either of these.) Please LMK how they turn out if you try it with one of these alternatives!

      • — Jenn on November 19, 2020
      • Reply
  • Great recipe. Wondering if these be frozen for a few days and then reheated?

    • — Kim Ashmead on November 18, 2020
    • Reply
    • I wouldn’t recommend freezing them — sorry!

      • — Jenn on November 19, 2020
      • Reply
  • I’ve made this for the past 2 holidays as it’s one less thing to assemble last-minute. I keep flubbing it but I know it has good balance; the first time it was too liquidy but I accidentally used 18% cream instead of 35%. The second time it was a tad too salty but I had also reduced the cream for fear of the return of the mashed potato soup; what I didn’t consider was the balance of salt to fat changing so I didn’t also reduce the salt accordingly.

    It was still tasty both times, and I’m sure it will balance perfectly if I just follow the dang recipe to a T. There’s a holiday life-saver in this one, folks.

    • — Corrine on November 16, 2020
    • Reply
  • You used 5 potatoes in this recipe? I need to double it making sure it was 5. Thank you

    • — Nicole on November 15, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Nicole, The number of potatoes use depends on the size of the potatoes so I wouldn’t go based on the number of potatoes, but rather the weight. If you’re doubling the recipe, you’ll need 7 pounds of potatoes. Hope that helps and that you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 16, 2020
      • Reply
  • I’d like to avoid communal dishes right now – what would you suggest to serve the mashed potatoes back in the skins. Would I make it ahead and then on the day of serving, scoop mounds of the mashed potatoes back into the skins and how would you suggest I prep the skins and reheating. I made the mashed potatoes last year and everyone loved them. I loved them because they could be made days before and were the best, creamiest mashed potatoes I’ve ever made. I did use a potato ricer which I think made them fluffier.

    • — Marilyn Segal on November 13, 2020
    • Reply
    • Sure Marilyn, I think that would work. I don’t have a recipe for the potato skin shells, but I think you could easily find something online that would work. Please LMK how they turn out!

      • — Jenn on November 13, 2020
      • Reply
    • Marilyn – just some thoughts. If you microwave the skins they will end up soggy. I would suggest putting the skins alone in a 300-degree oven on a sheet to let them heat up and get somewhat crispy – shouldn’t take long. Then scoop the microwaved potatoes in. Keep in mind that if you have people serving themselves with the same utensil, you probably aren’t reducing the chances of infection by much. Of course if you’re just plating it up for each individual that could work. Hope it turns out well!

      • — Jenny on November 15, 2020
      • Reply
      • Thanks Jenny,
        I plan on plating and weather permitting will be outdoors. I’m deep frying two turkeys so I think I will deep fry the potato skins (in for a penny, in for a pound, the oil will be hot and the turkeys take about thirty minutes each so I’m guessing the potato skins will only take a minute). Last year I served the deep fried potato skins cut in quarters with chives and sour cream as appetizers along with Jenn’s baked Brie.

        • — Marilyn Segal on November 21, 2020
        • Reply
  • EXCELLENT! I made the recipe exactly as written and they were beyond my expectations. Everyone loved them! Thank you so much!

    • — Cathy on November 12, 2020
    • Reply
  • If I don’t have a microwave, can I reheat these in the oven with a good result?
    Thanks!

    • — Kristin on November 12, 2020
    • Reply
    • Sure, Kristin, you can reheat them in a conventional oven at 350°F, covered with foil, for 30-40 min (stirring once halfway through) or until warm. Enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 12, 2020
      • Reply
  • These potatoes are ABSOLUTELY DELICIOUS and the fact that they can be made ahead is a bonus particularly for Thanksgiving and Christmas turkey dinners when there is a lot going on just before serving. Creamy and delicious…honestly you will love these!

    • — Anita R on November 12, 2020
    • Reply
  • So glad to receive this recipe this morning! Just last night I was saying how I can’t seem to make good mashed potatoes on Thanksgiving day… here is my solution- thanks so much!

    • — Alli on November 12, 2020
    • Reply
  • If I wanted to divide these in half before the microwave step, I assume that the microwave time would change. Any idea how I should modify? I’m sure I can muddle through it but would like to have easy directions for the recipients!

    • — Julia on November 10, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Julia, I don’t know for sure, but I would guess they’d take about 10 minutes or so (with stirring halfway through). Definitely a strange Thanksgiving this year, but hope it’s a happy one!

      • — Jenn on November 10, 2020
      • Reply
  • I don’t have a microwave. Can these potatoes be warmed up in a saucepan on the stovetop?

    • — Louise Forrest on November 2, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Louise, you can reheat them in a conventional oven at 350°F, covered with foil, for 30-40 min (stirring once halfway through) or until warm. If you won’t have access to your oven, I think it will work on the stove if you reheat them gently – if they get too thick, stir in a little milk and butter to thin them back out. Enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 2, 2020
      • Reply

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