Coq au Vin

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Coq au vin is a hearty French stew of chicken braised in red wine with mushrooms and crisp pancetta.

Rich and brimming with flavor, coq au vin is a classic French stew of chicken braised in red wine with mushrooms and crispy pancetta. It’s the perfect cooking project to tackle on a chilly weekend when you’ve got a few hours to burn; naturally, anything that tastes this wonderful takes some time. As with most stews, it is even better the next day, and it freezes well, too.

I love coq au vin with buttered egg noodles, mashed potatoes, or a good crusty bread — basically anything to soak up the full-flavored sauce. If you like my Beef Bourguignon, you’ll love this recipe, too.

What You’ll Need To Make Coq au Vin

ingredients for Coq au Vin

Before we get to the step-by-step, a few notes about the ingredients:

  • Traditional recipes for coq au vin call for a whole cut-up chicken (a coq is an old rooster), but I prefer to use only bone-in chicken thighs only. The thighs remain tender and succulent when braised for a long time, whereas white meat tends to dry out.
  • Pancetta is simply Italian bacon. Instead of being smoked like American bacon, it is cured with salt and spices and then dried. You can find it in the deli at most supermarkets or precut and packaged in the refrigerated gourmet foods aisle, which is a great time saver.
  • For the wine, a Burgundy or Pinot Noir is traditional but any light or medium bodied red wine, such as Merlot or Zinfandel, will also work. You don’t need to use an expensive bottle; just make sure it’s good enough to drink (no supermarket cooking wine!).
  • Cognac, a type of French brandy, is delicious in cocktails like this pomegranate Sangria, but it also adds complex flavor to savory dishes like chicken Pot Pie, gravies, and stews.
  • You may notice that my recipe does not call for the traditional garnish of pearl onions. They can be difficult to find, and I actually prefer the stew without them. If you’d like to add them, be sure to brown them in butter and cook them thoroughly before adding them to the finished stew.

How To Make Coq au Vin

To begin, heat the oil in a large (5-qt) Dutch oven or heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Add the pancetta (or bacon) and cook until the fat has rendered and the pancetta is crispy, 5 to 8 minutes.
cooking pancettaUsing a slotted spoon, transfer the pancetta to a paper-towel-lined plate, leaving the fat in the pan. Season the chicken all over with 2 teaspoons salt and ½ teaspoon pepper. Increase the heat to medium-high and brown half of the chicken in a single layer, skin side down, until golden and crispy, about 5 minutes (brown on the skin side only). Using tongs, transfer the chicken to a plate; set aside.

browning chickenPour off all but about 2 tablespoons of the fat, then return the pot to the stove and reduce the heat to medium-low. Cook the onions, stirring occasionally, until softened and just starting to brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant, about 1 minute more.

cooking onions and garlic

Pour in the Cognac and cook, stirring to scrape the brown bits from the bottom of the pan, until the Cognac has evaporated.

deglazing the pan with Cognac

Add the wine, chicken broth, tomato paste, balsamic vinegar, sugar, thyme, bay leaf, and ½ teaspoon salt and bring to a boil.

bringing liquid to a boilReduce the heat to medium and gently boil, uncovered, for 15 minutes.

reduced liquid

Add the chicken and any accumulated juices from the plate back to the pot, along with the carrots. Bring to a simmer, then cover and cook over low heat for 30 minutes, or until the chicken and carrots are cooked through.

adding chicken and carrots to pot

While the chicken cooks, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the mushrooms and 1/4 teaspoon salt and cook, stirring frequently, until the mushrooms are golden brown, about 5 minutes. Set aside.

sautéed mushrooms

Also while the chicken cooks: In a small bowl, combine the softened butter and flour.

butter and flour in bowl

Mash with a spoon to make a smooth paste. In French, this is called a beurre manié (or kneaded butter). Set aside.

beurre manié

Using a slotted spoon, transfer the cooked chicken to a plate. The wine gives it a purplish hue.

cooked chicken on plate

Using a fork and knife, pull the skin off of the chicken (it should slide right off) and discard. The skin has served its purpose by lending flavor to the sauce and protecting the meat from drying out. You don’t have to do remove it, but it’s soggy at this point and I think the dish is more appetizing without it.

chicken with skin removedIncrease the heat in the Dutch oven/pot to medium and stir in three-quarters of the flour and butter paste.

adding beurre manié

Gently boil until the sauce is thickened, 5 to 7 minutes; add the remaining paste if you’d like the sauce a little thicker. Fish out and discard the bay leaf.

simmering sauce to thicken

Add the chicken and any accumulated juices back to the pot and simmer, uncovered, for about 10 minutes. Right before serving, stir in the browned mushrooms and pancetta. Taste and adjust seasoning, if necessary.

adding chicken. mushrooms, and pancetta back to pot

Serve immediately or let cool, chill in the refrigerator, and reheat when ready to serve.

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Coq au Vin

Coq au vin is a hearty French stew of chicken braised in red wine with mushrooms and crisp pancetta.

Servings: 6
Prep Time: 30 Minutes
Cook Time: 1 Hour 40 Minutes
Total Time: 2 Hours 10 Minutes

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 4 ounces diced pancetta (or bacon)
  • 8 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs (about 4 pounds), trimmed of excess skin (see note)
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 large yellow onion, roughly chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
  • 1/4 cup Cognac
  • 2-1/2 cups red wine, preferably Burgundy or Pinot Noir
  • 2-1/2 cups chicken broth
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves (or 1 teaspoon dried)
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 3 large carrots, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch chunks on the bias
  • 8 ounces sliced cremini mushrooms
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
  • 4 tablespoons all-purpose flour

Instructions

  1. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large (5-qt) Dutch oven or heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Add the pancetta and cook until the fat has rendered and the pancetta is crispy, 5 to 8 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the pancetta to a paper-towel-lined plate, leaving the fat in the pan.
  2. Season the chicken all over with 2 teaspoons salt and ½ teaspoon pepper. Increase the heat to medium-high and brown half of the chicken in a single layer, skin side down, until golden and crispy, about 5 minutes (brown on the skin side only). Using tongs, transfer the chicken to a plate; set aside. Repeat with the remaining chicken. Pour off all but about 2 tablespoons of the fat.
  3. Return the pot to the stove and reduce the heat to medium-low. Add the onions to the pot and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are softened and just starting to brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant, about 1 minute more. Add the Cognac and cook, stirring to scrape the brown bits from the bottom of the pan, until the Cognac has evaporated. Add the wine, chicken broth, tomato paste, balsamic vinegar, sugar, thyme, bay leaf, and ½ teaspoon salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium and gently boil, uncovered, for 15 minutes.
  4. Add the chicken and any accumulated juices from the plate back to the pot, along with the carrots. Bring to a simmer, then cover and cook over low heat for 30 minutes, or until the chicken and carrots are cooked through.
  5. While the chicken cooks, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the mushrooms and 1/4 teaspoon salt and cook, stirring frequently, until the mushrooms are golden brown, about 5 minutes. Set aside.
  6. Also while the chicken cooks: In a small bowl, mash the softened butter and flour to make a smooth paste. Set aside.
  7. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the cooked chicken to a plate.
  8. Increase the heat in the Dutch oven/pot to medium and stir in three-quarters of the flour and butter paste. Gently boil until the sauce is thickened, 5 to 7 minutes; add the remaining paste if you'd like the sauce a little thicker. Fish out and discard the bay leaf.
  9. Using a fork and knife, pull the skin off of the chicken and discard.
  10. Add the chicken and any accumulated juices back to the pot and simmer, uncovered, for about 10 minutes. Right before serving, stir in the browned mushrooms and pancetta. Taste and adjust seasoning, if necessary, then serve.
  11. Make-Ahead Instructions: Let cool to room temperature and then store in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. Reheat over medium-low heat on the stovetop before serving. (For best results, store the sautéed mushrooms and crispy pancetta in separate containers in the refrigerator and add before serving.)
  12. Freezer-Friendly Instructions: This can be frozen for up to 3 months. Before serving, defrost the stew in the refrigerator for 24 hours and then reheat on the stovetop over medium-low heat until hot.
  13. Note: Sometimes chicken thighs have excess skin and/or fat. Before cooking, using kitchen shears, trim any skin that extends farther than the edges of the chicken thigh, and snip off any excess fat.

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Reviews & Comments

  • Fantastic. My family was amazed by this one. I have made so many of your recipes and ALL of them are amazing. Thanks for teaching me so many things. Blessings to you!

    • — Paula on May 2, 2020
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    • 💓

      • — Jenn on May 3, 2020
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  • Absolutely delicious and a great recipe to pass the time while at home. We used a Cabernet Sauvignon since it was the only red we had on hand and it still made for the perfect sauce. We can’t wait until we can entertain again because we will definitely be using this recipe!

    • — Kelli on April 24, 2020
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  • Excellent dinner choice to please a crowd!

    • — Emily Krebs on March 31, 2020
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  • Hi Jenn,
    My husband does not eat pork. Can/should I substitute the bacon with turkey bacon or just skip this step altogether?

    • — Nitza Geiger on March 19, 2020
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    • Hi Nitza, Turkey bacon would work here. You could also just omit the pancetta. (It will still be delicious.) Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on March 19, 2020
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  • I made this for our anniversary celebration instead of going out. My husband said it is restaurant quality….and was perfect….we didn’t waste one drop of that sauce. I followed the recipe as directed, except we pulled our skin off the thighs as we ate them….as dinner was already late…and didn’t want to take that extra step. Only thing I would change is to add more carrots and mushrooms. This was a simple dish with complex flavor. I made pearl couscous (toasted israeli style pasta) to go with this….it was perfect! Thank you!

    • — Karen T on March 19, 2020
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    • Happy Anniversary, Karen! So happy you both enjoyed it. 💕

      • — Jenn on March 19, 2020
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  • Hi Jenn,

    I, too, want to add my thanks, appreciation, and praise for your wonderful site and book. Have been cooking for many years, with a cupboard full of cookbooks and recipes; but find myself turning to yours time and again, secure in the knowledge that I’ll find something enticing, relatively easy to prepare, and guaranteed to please.

    Planning on doing your Coq au Vin for eight people. Without going through the whole recipe, could you please tell me how you’d adjust ingredient quantities? Thanks so much.

    • — Jan on March 5, 2020
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    • So glad you like the recipes, Jan!! ❤️
      To serve 8, I’d multiply all the ingredients by 1.5. Hope everyone enjoys!

      • — Jenn on March 5, 2020
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  • The absolute best I have ever made and guests agreed. I followed the recipe exactly and would not change a thing. I have made MANY of your recipes and they never disappoint. Your thoroughness and attention to detail are greatly appreciated. I wish other sources would do the same. By the way, I have been a serious cook for 40 years and don’t give praise easily!

    • — Richard Hassall on March 4, 2020
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    • So glad you enjoyed it!! 🙂

      • — Jenn on March 5, 2020
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  • finally making for company…want to time it with the noodles
    how long to reheat and at what temperature…med or med/low
    thanks Jenn

    • — Carol Winkelman on February 28, 2020
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    • Hi Carol, It’s hard to give an exact number, but I would guess that it might take about 10 minutes over medium heat. You could also reheat it 30 minutes before you plan to serve, then take it off the heat, cover, and keep warm. Simply place the stew back on the heat for a few minutes while you boil the noodles so it’s hot to serve. Hope everyone enjoys!

      • — Jenn on February 28, 2020
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  • Excited to try this recipe this weekend! Jenn, is there a type of cognac you recommend, or could I use brandy that’s already in my liquor cabinet as substitute?

    • — Maggie on February 27, 2020
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    • Hi Maggie, I use Courvoisier but if you already have brandy in your liquor cabinet, I’d just use that. Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on February 27, 2020
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  • Hi Jenn,
    I just made this for Valentine’s dinner for my husband. I have made a lot of your recipes and they have always been a hit but this was the best bar none he said! I used bacon because it’s what I had and used whisky instead of cognac to deglaze the pan. Outstanding! Spectacular! Best ever! Thanks so much for making me look so good!

    • — Nancy Mayville on February 14, 2020
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  • If anyone is interested, I very successfully substituted grape juice (type with no sugar added) and a dash of red wine vinegar in place of the red wine. Also omitted the cognac. And I halved the recipe. So I basically butchered the recipe as listed and it’s probably not authentic AT ALL but it still tasted AMAZING. Can’t wait til I’m no longer pregnant and will be back to cooking with (and drinking!) wine! I’m sure when the coq is actually paired with the vin it’ll taste even more fab!

    • — Suzanne on February 13, 2020
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    • Thanks for weighing in Suzanne — I’m sure readers will appreciate hearing how your non-alcoholic version worked out!

      • — Jenn on February 14, 2020
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  • I made this recipe, and my wife and I both thought the finished dish was terrific. We did let it rest overnight in the fridge, and re-heated it for our lunch. Great! By the way, I love how your recipes begin with an extended “lesson” with step-by-step photos, with tips and comments along the way, before you get to the “short-form” recipe. Very helpful, very clever!

    • — Loren Chudy on February 13, 2020
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  • Would 4.5 qt. Le creuset work for this recipe?

    • — Beth on February 4, 2020
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    • It should fit, but you won’t have much room to spare! 🙂

      • — Jenn on February 4, 2020
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      • I did try the 4.5 pan and there really wasn’t enough room so I ended up transferring it to a bigger pan in the end. It turned out to be delicious. Another great recipe from your repertoire!

        • — Beth on February 13, 2020
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        • Sorry to have misled you a bit, but glad it turned out well. Thanks for reporting back in as your follow up will be helpful for other readers!

          • — Jenn on February 13, 2020
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  • Did you serve with brown rice in promo photo ? I 💕your beef stew with red wine as so worth the time & effort as all you recipes are perfection !

    • — Patricia on January 31, 2020
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    • So glad you like the recipes, Patricia! No, I’ve never served this over brown rice, but you could. I really like it best over buttered egg noodles or mashed potatoes. 🙂

      • — Jenn on January 31, 2020
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  • Hello! Sorry to ask such a sill question but I am new to cooking, do I go to the liquor store to purchase the Cognac or is there a cooking Cognac in the stores. Same question as the red wine. Can that be purchased in a store. I don’t drink so I know nothing about them. Thanks!

    • — Kim Motley on January 30, 2020
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    • **silly**

      • — Kim Motley on January 30, 2020
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    • Hi Kim, You can get the wine at a grocery store (if it’s available where you live) but you’ll probably have to go to the liquor store for the cognac.

      • — Jenn on January 30, 2020
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  • This recipe is easy, and the result is absolutely delicious! I made it for the first time a couple of weeks ago, and I’m making it again tomorrow. Luckily, a friend had been given me a bottle of French cognac for Christmas, so I didn’t need to go and buy one. My company raved about this coq au vin! I used gluten free flour, and the sauce was perfect.

    • — Joyce on January 30, 2020
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  • I made Coq au Vin once for my wife and I when I was in law school and it was delicious. I made it again about a year later (from the same recipe) and it was meh, at best, so I gave it up for 30 or so years. But because I’ve never disliked anything I have made from a recipe from this site, I made the coq au vin recipe last weekend. My wife, who never has anything too bad to say about my cooking, whether it is true or not, said “this is good”. A few seconds later she said “this is really good!” I heard more than one “this is really good” from her over the next day or so and I agree. This is really… really … good! Jenn, thank you once again for another great recipe!

    • — Kevin on January 30, 2020
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  • Thanks, Jenn! Yum!! Sooooo darn good! I made it for solely my husband and me (but it’s totally company-worthy!) so we could have lots of leftovers. It just got better and better! It’s a foolproof recipe, as is every single recipe I’ve tried from your cookbook.

    • — Elaine in San Francisco on January 29, 2020
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  • Your Coq au Vin was the highlight of our winter Sunday, Jenn! Since finding your blog from Pinterest two years ago and then purchasing your wonderful book, I have been so impressed with the consistent ease and excellent outcomes in following your recipes. I even gifted your book to my two God daughters this past Christmas and both of them are loving trying your family friendly recipes. This Coq au Vin was super flavorful and my husband and I can’t wait to have the leftovers! Definitely a keeper recipe! Thanks so much!!

    • — Catriona on January 27, 2020
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    • You’re so welcome – thanks for all of your support! ❤️

      • — Jenn on January 27, 2020
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  • Amazing. I only had skinless/boneless thighs but otherwise followed the recipe exactly. I made this recipe a day ahead and then added the cooked mushrooms and pancetta after re-heating as directed. I served it with mashed russet potato and a glass of pinot noir (what I used for the recipe). OMG. I wish had a better vocabulary to describe my impression, hahaha… I’m going to “change it up” and make noodles with the leftovers tonight. Thank you, Jenn!

    • — Nicole on January 26, 2020
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  • CAN YOU USE BONE-IN SKIN ON CHICKEN BREASTS INSTEAD OF THIGHS?

    • — MELISSA on January 25, 2020
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    • Hi Melissa, I’ve made this with both breasts and thighs much prefer dark meat here. White meat can be used – you just have to be really careful not to overcook it. Cut the chicken breasts in half so they aren’t too big and reduce the cook time to about 20 minutes (for the first phase). Please LMK how they turn out!

      • — Jenn on January 27, 2020
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  • We tried this last night I have made several Coq au Vin recipes in the past and they were great but yours was at another level when you are eating this in amazement you know it’s something special. I would give it a ten but the ratings don’t go that high. Thanks and look forward to the next. Greg

    • — Greg and Sherry Heiden on January 25, 2020
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  • I made this last night, to be served tonight. It is already delicious! Reserved the mushrooms and bacon separately. To serve, buttered long noodles as a nod to Chinese New Year.

    Your instructions are easy to follow and straightforward. Time consuming, a little, but worth it. Thanks!

    • — Brigid on January 25, 2020
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  • Absolutely delicious and so easy to make! I made 2 batches and glad I did, as my family wanted it again the next night.

    • — Liz Matthews on January 25, 2020
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  • Let me echo what most others have said: This was a lot of work AND it was worth it. Totally wonderful and much appreciated by our guests last night. Used thick cut bacon instead of pancetta b/c that’s what I had on hand. Served it with garlic mashed potatoes and a crusty baguette. Finished up with a light dessert of sorbet and macarons. Fab! Looking forward to the leftovers tonight.

    • — Karen O on January 24, 2020
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  • So good! Another winner from Jenn’s recipes. Did not have any cognac but it still tasted delicious. This is one of those dishes that tastes great the second day!

    • — Amy C on January 24, 2020
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  • Jen, this dish was just amazing! I swear… I have yet to find one of your dishes that wasn’t a family favorite. I will add a bit more pancetta next time, because… bacon… and the only other twist I made was using baby bellas because I love their flavor. This became a thick, rich silky stew that nailed it. I had never seen making a “roux paste”. That worked quite well. Now we are fighting over who gets the left-over gravy to pour over baked potatoes tonight!

    Thank you for all these amazing recipes!

    • — Bruce Ahrendt on January 24, 2020
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  • It did take quite a bit of time to make but it is the best coq au vin I have ever made! I did increase the amount of carrots and mushrooms and added the pearl onions after sautéing them in butter. Served it with boiled potatoes and beet salad. Everyone loved it! Thanks again Jenn!

    • — Kathy on January 23, 2020
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  • Made the recipe last night. The sauce was amazing but I added chicken legs to the thighs and my chicken was undercooked… I followed the recipe to the tee…where did I go wrong?

    • — Jane on January 23, 2020
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    • Hi Jane, Did you increase the total amount of meat? If so, it would take longer to cook.

      • — Jenn on January 23, 2020
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  • This was an awesome dish! Wish it wasn’t quite so labor intensive though, but worth it!

    • — Cindy on January 23, 2020
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  • We made the Coq au Vin tonight and it was perfectly marvelous! I had to substitute prosciutto for pancetta because that is what was available in our smaller midwestern town but the dish was delicious!

    • — Kathleen on January 21, 2020
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  • French cuisine has always been one of the best cuisines in the world and I’m sure with your talent, skills, it’d probably be the only best!👍

    • — Seán Deviam on January 21, 2020
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    • Thanks for the kind words Sean — hope you enjoy if you make it! 🙂

      • — Jenn on January 21, 2020
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  • Thank you for this recipe! Followed exactly and WOW! HOME RUN! Jenn, you never fail to impress me!

    • — CHRISTINE PAULL on January 20, 2020
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  • Hi, Jen. I haven’t made this yet, but it sounds so delicious! Unless I’ve missed something in reading through the recipe, you remove the skin but leave the meat on the bone. Would it be ok the remove the meat from the bone before serving? Your recipes are fabulous! Thank you!!

    • — Dee on January 20, 2020
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    • Hi Dee, It’s perfectly fine to remove the meat from the bone at the same time you remove the skin. Hope you enjoy it!

      • — Jenn on January 20, 2020
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  • Another fabulous dinner. You are one of the top Pinterest cooks! Always perfect. Thanks for so many delicious dishes

    • — Gayle on January 20, 2020
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    • You’re so welcome! 💓

      • — Jenn on January 20, 2020
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  • Hi Jenn!

    Thank you for another amazing recipe! It popped into my inbox on Thursday and that was Friday sorted 🙂 I had never used (or heard of) the beurre manié technique before, and it worked a treat. There was a deep, umami flavour to the dish, and the final addition of the lardons and mushrooms was exquisite. And the little bit that was left over was just as good the day after. Well done Jenn.

    • — Sinéad on January 20, 2020
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  • A perfect football Sunday dinner. It does take time but we’ll worth the effort. Recipe is easy to follow with every day ingredients. Delicious combination of flavors.

    • — Brady on January 19, 2020
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  • This was beyond amazing! The flavors were outstanding & I received a double thumbs up from all 3 of my kids. My husband loved it too!

    • — Maura on January 19, 2020
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  • I made this today and it was very , very good! You are my go to for recipes and when I saw this I just had to make it!!! So happy I did , it’s a winner! Thank you Jen got making me a great cook!

    • — Sherri on January 19, 2020
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  • I have been eating coq au vin since I was a child and have been making it with different recipes since I became an adult (many decades ago). This is it! Best ever!

    • — Joanne on January 19, 2020
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  • My husband is going out of town for the week so I prepped everything last night and cooked mid-morning so it was ready for lunch. What a delicious way to start a long week for him!
    My son and daughter in law will be coming by tonight after their honey moon and I’ll send them home with the leftovers!
    Delicious, delicious!
    I’m looking forward to making it again soon.
    Thank you!

    • — Anita on January 19, 2020
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  • Hi Jen,

    Would white wine work? If yes how much? I am really enjoying your recipes. I have made tons of them and have not been disappointed. Keep those recipes coming😁

    • — Janelle on January 18, 2020
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    • Hi Janelle, The taste will be different but I do think white wine would work well (same amount). Please LMK how it turns out!

      • — Jenn on January 18, 2020
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      • I made this dish today and it was delicious. Even my husband raved about how delicious it was. Served it with mashed cauliflower and sautéed green beans. Thank you Jenn!!

        • — Janelle on January 19, 2020
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  • This 86 year old foodie has never eaten Coq Au Vin and it was on my bucket list. so…with bad weather coming, I did my shopping yesterday and spent hours in the kitchen today. Jenn, it is incredible, one of the best things I’ve ever made. Used a good pinot noir and Courvoisier. Made exactly as written with the addition of some sauteed pearl onions Removing the chicken skin is ingenious. My only problem was lifting the full Le Cruset pot from the stove…too heavy for me. Good thing I live in an apartment building with an around the clock doorman. (Gave him a taste of the sauce and he swooned.) Serving it tomorrow with the roasted beet salad. Reheating, which is easier, stove top or 275 degree oven? I can hardly wait to eat it

    • — Carol Winkelman on January 18, 2020
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    • So glad it turned out well, Carol! I think it’s easiest to reheat on the stovetop. 😊

      • — Jenn on January 18, 2020
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      • finally making for company and want to check my timing for reheating so that the noodles will be ready when the chicken is hot…how long should it take

        • — Carol Winkelman on February 27, 2020
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        • Hi Carol, It’s hard to give an exact number, but I would guess that it might take about 5 – 10 minutes over medium heat. Please LMK how it turns out!

          • — Jenn on February 28, 2020
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    • Would this work with skinless chicken thighs?

      • — Erin on January 20, 2020
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      • Technically it would, but you’d skip the browning step for the chicken. (You will get a much richer flavor in the finished dish if you use skin-on thighs and remove the skin before serving.)

        • — Jenn on January 21, 2020
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  • Loved it

    • — Joanne m. on January 18, 2020
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  • I just made this exactly as written and it was so delicious. I feel like a French cooking genius! Thanks for sharing.

    • — Kim on January 17, 2020
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  • Is a good Scotch a possible sub for Cognac?

    • — Anna Johnston on January 17, 2020
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    • No, I wouldn’t recommend scotch here (but you can just leave the Cognac out if you don’t have it). Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on January 21, 2020
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  • Will using boneless chicken thighs diminish the flavor?

    • — Julie Miller on January 17, 2020
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    • The bones do add a lot so, yes, it will have an impact on the finished dish. Also, you won’t need to cook the chicken as long so it won’t get quite as infused with the other flavors. Last, it’s pretty hard to find boneless chicken thighs that have skin on them.

      • — Jenn on January 17, 2020
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  • Hi Jen – I’m looking forward to making this recipe this weekend! Quick question: you state in the recipe that you should brown half the chicken, but you don’t then reference browning the other half. Is there a reason not to brown all of the pieces of chicken? Thanks for the help!

    • — Meg on January 16, 2020
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    • That was a mistake, Meg – – thank you for catching that and letting me know. It’s fixed! 🙂

      • — Jenn on January 17, 2020
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  • I thought I ruined my dinner when I put the wrong amount of vinegar in but it was still fantastic!!!! I made the roasted beet salad & chocolate mousse for dessert. Everyone loved it!!! I’ll definitely make this again!

    • — Gina on January 16, 2020
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  • If you’re going to remove the skin before serving, why bother browning it? Why not remove it before browning, and brown the skinless thighs? It seems cooking the chicken with the skin on would just add to the fat in the dish for no apparent benefit. That being said (asked), the recipe looks delicious! I can’t rate the recipe because I haven’t made it yet. Waiting for some definitive answer re to skin or not to skin the thighs. I enjoy so many of your recipes and the web site. Keep ’em coming!

    • — Barbara Calhoun on January 16, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Barbara, Great question – I like to brown the skin-on chicken to render the fat, and then use the fat to cook the onions and garlic. This adds lots of flavor. Leaving the skin on during the cooking process also adds flavor to the sauce. Once the chicken braises for a long time, the skin gets very soggy (there’s really no way to keep it crisp) so I think the dish is more appetizing without it. Since the fat from the skin is rendered in the beginning and any excess fat is discarded before cooking the onions and garlic, the sauce really isn’t greasy. Hope that clarifies!

      • — Jenn on January 16, 2020
      • Reply
      • Yup! Thanks. Can’t wait to try it.

        • — barbara calhoun on January 17, 2020
        • Reply
      • Could you omit the mushrooms? Making for a family member that does not like them. Would substitute peas or another vegetable.

        • — Kaylie on January 17, 2020
        • Reply
        • Sure, Kaylie – peas would work. Enjoy!

          • — Jenn on January 17, 2020
          • Reply
  • Do you have the nutrition info on this recipe?

    • — Nancy L Robertson on January 16, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Nancy, I didn’t include nutritional info for this recipe because there were a number of variables (i.e., using some but not all of the pancetta fat, removing the chicken skin after cooking) that made me concerned that the information I provided wouldn’t be accurate.

      • — Jenn on January 17, 2020
      • Reply
  • Can you use breasts instead of thighs?

    • — Jane on January 16, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Jane, I have made it both ways and much prefer to use dark meat. However, white meat can be used – you just have to be really careful not to overcook it. Cut the chicken breasts in half so they aren’t enormous and reduce the cook time to about 20 minutes (for the first phase).

      • — Jenn on January 17, 2020
      • Reply
  • Good, no pearl onions! I can’t handle squishing one of those in my mouth. Just doesn’t work for me. Now regular onions? Ah, they’re fine!

    • — Keith R. Starkey on January 16, 2020
    • Reply
  • Could you substitute the wine with all chicken stock or half chicken half beef?

    • — Stephanie on January 16, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Stephanie, while you could substitute the wine with chicken or beef broth, the dish will taste very different. (Coq au Vin literally means chicken in wine.) The dish will still be good but will have a significantly different flavor and color. Please LMK how it turns out if you try it this way!

      • — Jenn on January 17, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi Jenn: Will brandy work?

    • — Pam on January 16, 2020
    • Reply
    • Yep (brandy and Cognac are the same thing – Cognac just gets its name as it’s made in the Cognac region of France).

      • — Jenn on January 16, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi Jenn, Im excited To try this recipe, I did inquire a few months ago if you had this recipe, Im so glad you followed up and shared it. Thanks

    • — Tami on January 16, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on January 16, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi Jenn: will brandy work as I have no Cognac?

    • — Pamela on January 16, 2020
    • Reply
    • Yep (brandy and Cognac are the same thing – Cognac just gets its name as it’s made in the Cognac region of France). Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on January 16, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi, Jen – I just wanted to say “thank you!” for specifying the thyme in tablespoons of leaves instead of by sprigs. I never know how much thyme is in a “typical” sprig, so stripping the leaves and measuring with a spoon is far more exact, and reassuring. Thank you.

    • — Laura on January 16, 2020
    • Reply
  • I don’t have brandy. Is there a substitute or could it be omitted?

    • — Julie on January 16, 2020
    • Reply
    • It’s fine to omit it, Julie. Enjoy!

      • — Jenn on January 16, 2020
      • Reply
  • Will the recipe still be good if I don’t use the Cognac? Hate to buy a bottle just for one recipe.
    Thanks.
    Kathy

    • — Kathy Nelson on January 16, 2020
    • Reply
    • Yep, perfectly fine to leave it out. 🙂

      • — Jenn on January 16, 2020
      • Reply
    • One thing I do is go to a local store like BevMo and buy the small bottles of liquor if I need only a small amount for cooking. They’re the size of what you get in the hotel. Wine also comes in 1/2 bottle sizes, I do cook enough that I usually have a full bottle of at least one red and one white at home along with sake and Chinese rice wine for Asian recipes.

      • — LC on January 17, 2020
      • Reply
  • Ah, one of my wife’s favorite winter-time meals. She refers to it affectionately as “coco chicken”, and we always freeze a few servings for later use.

    Your recipe is a bit different from others that I’ve followed in the past, with the additions of cognac, balsamic vinegar, and sugar. I’ll look forward to giving it a try.

    • — Mark on January 16, 2020
    • Reply
  • This looks delicious…..I am not a fan of dark meat. Do you think it would be ok to use chicken breasts or would it ruin the recipe?

    • — maura on January 16, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Maura, I have made it both ways and much prefer to use dark meat. However, white meat can be used – you just have to be really careful not to overcook it. Cut the chicken breasts in half so they aren’t enormous and reduce the cook time to about 20 minutes (for the first phase).

      • — Jenn on January 16, 2020
      • Reply
  • Jenn this looks so good and I can’t wait to make it tonight. We don’t eat pork, so would you please suggest an alternative to the pancetta? Would turkey bacon or chicken sausage chorizo work?
    P.S I have said this many times, but you are amazing and your recipes are 100% delicious and easy to follow. I can’t begin to tell you how many of your recipes I have shared and passed on to friends and family . Your creativity and talent is an inspiration !

    • — Sameera on January 16, 2020
    • Reply
    • Thank you, Sameera — so happy you enjoy the recipes! Turkey bacon should work nicely. You could also just omit the pancetta; it will still be delicious.

      • — Jenn on January 16, 2020
      • Reply
  • Any changes if I want to use a whole chicken, they are on sale this week.

    • — Laurel on January 16, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Laurel, If you want to include breasts, cut them in half so they aren’t huge and remove them from the stew after about 20 minutes so they don’t overcook.

      • — Jenn on January 16, 2020
      • Reply
  • Jenn-This looks good but my husband does not eat any red meat so I would like to try it without the Pancetta. Do you think that would be a problem or should I substitute anything for it? Thanks! Kathy

    • — Kathy Russo on January 16, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Kathy, It will still be delicious without the pancetta – just leave it out and use the first tablespoon of oil to brown the chicken. Hope you enjoy it!

      • — Jenn on January 16, 2020
      • Reply
  • Could cornstarch be used instead of flour to thicken the sauce for gluten free eaters? If so, how much?

    • — Jane on January 16, 2020
    • Reply
    • Sure, Jane – I’d start with 1 tablespoon of cornstarch dissolved in 1 tablespoon cold water. You may need up to 2 tablespoons but I’d add it little by little. Hope that helps and please LMK how it turns out. 🙂

      • — Jenn on January 16, 2020
      • Reply
      • If you don’t like the different texture that cornstarch gives to sauces, my favourite gluten-free thickener is sweet rice flour. It’s called “sweet” not because it has sugar in it or is particularly sweet itself, but because this type of rice is traditionally used in the Orient to make sweets (desserts), apparently. It can be substituted for wheat flour on a one-to-one basis (one tablespoon of all purpose flour = 1 tablespoon of sweet rice flour). I actually prefer it as a thickener and use it all the time even when I don’t need a gluten-free gravy or sauce. It works exactly the same as all-purpose flour but seems less prone to lumping. You can find it in health food stores or bulk food stores if your regular grocery store doesn’t carry it. (It is also good as a replacement for flour in coating foods for frying etc.)

        • — Kristy on January 16, 2020
        • Reply
      • I’m making your coq au vain & I just put in 2 T of balsamic instead of 2tsp. If you see this what should I do

        • — Gina Brewer on January 16, 2020
        • Reply
        • Hi Gina, I would just proceed with the recipe – if it tastes too acidic at the end, you can add more chicken broth to fix it. (Keep in mind that you may need more of the butter/flour paste if you add a lot of liquid to the sauce.)

          • — Jenn on January 16, 2020
          • Reply

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