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Coq au Vin

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Coq au vin is a hearty French stew of chicken braised in red wine with mushrooms and crisp pancetta.

Dutch oven of coq au vin.

Rich and brimming with flavor, coq au vin is a classic French stew of chicken braised in red wine with mushrooms and crispy pancetta. It’s the perfect cooking project to tackle on a chilly weekend when you’ve got a few hours to burn. As with most stews, coq au vin is even better the next day, and it freezes well, too. Serve with buttered egg noodles, mashed potatoes, or a good artisan bread — basically anything to soak up the full-flavored sauce.

“Oh my goodness, this was off the charts good…We are living in Paris now and I have to say this is better than any other coq au vin we’ve eaten locally. Merci beaucoup!”

Jennifer

What You’ll Need To Make Coq au Vin

ingredients for Coq au Vin
  • Pancetta: Infuses the dish with a salty, savory depth. Unlike American bacon, which is smoked, pancetta—Italian bacon—is cured with salt and spices before being dried. It’s readily available in most supermarkets, either at the deli counter or pre-cut and packaged in the refrigerated gourmet foods section, offering a convenient shortcut.
  • Chicken thighs: While traditional recipes for coq au vin call for a whole cut-up chicken (a coq is an old rooster), I prefer to use only bone-in chicken thighs only. The thighs remain tender and succulent when braised for a long time, whereas white meat tends to dry out.
  • Onion and garlic: These aromatics form the flavor foundation for the stew.
  • Cognac: A type of French brandy, cognac adds complex flavor (similar to how it used in other French-style dishes like chicken pot pie, steak au poivre, and turkey gravy).
  • Red wine: The key ingredient that characterizes Coq au Vin, lending the sauce its signature color and robust, fruity flavor.
  • Chicken broth: The savory base of the sauce.
  • Tomato paste: Contributes a concentrated burst of umami and acidity, deepening the sauce’s richness.
  • Fresh thyme and bay leaf: Infuse the dish with herbal notes.
  • Carrots and cremini mushrooms: These classic vegetable additions add sweetness, earthiness, and texture to the dish.
  • Butter and all-purpose flour: Combined to form a paste (called beurre manié or kneaded butter) used to thicken the sauce, ensuring it clings to the chicken and vegetables.
  • Jump to the printable recipe for precise measurements

Step-by-Step Instructions

To begin, heat the oil in a large (5-qt) Dutch oven or heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Add the pancetta (or bacon) and cook until the fat has rendered and the pancetta is crispy, 5 to 8 minutes.

Pancetta cooking in a Dutch oven.

Using a slotted spoon, transfer the pancetta to a paper-towel-lined plate, leaving the fat in the pan. Season the chicken all over with 2 teaspoons salt and ½ teaspoon pepper. Increase the heat to medium-high and brown half of the chicken in a single layer, skin side down, until golden and crispy, about 5 minutes (brown on the skin side only). Using tongs, transfer the chicken to a plate; set aside.

Tongs flipping browned chicken in a Dutch oven.

Pour off all but about 2 tablespoons of the fat, then return the pot to the stove and reduce the heat to medium-low. Cook the onions, stirring occasionally, until softened and just starting to brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant, about 1 minute more.

cooking onions and garlic

Pour in the Cognac and cook, stirring to scrape the brown bits from the bottom of the pan, until the Cognac has evaporated.

deglazing the pan with Cognac

Add the wine, chicken broth, tomato paste, balsamic vinegar, sugar, thyme, bay leaf, and ½ teaspoon salt and bring to a boil.

bringing liquid to a boil

Reduce the heat to medium and gently boil, uncovered, for 15 minutes.

Dutch oven of reduced liquid.

Add the chicken and any accumulated juices from the plate back to the pot, along with the carrots. Bring to a simmer, then cover and cook over low heat for 30 minutes, or until the chicken and carrots are cooked through.

adding chicken and carrots to pot

While the chicken cooks, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the mushrooms and 1/4 teaspoon salt and cook, stirring frequently, until the mushrooms are golden brown, about 5 minutes. Set aside.

sautéed mushrooms

Also while the chicken cooks: In a small bowl, combine the softened butter and flour.

butter and flour in bowl

Mash with a spoon to make a smooth paste. In French, this is called a beurre manié (or kneaded butter). Set aside.

Small bowl of beurre manié.

Using a slotted spoon, transfer the cooked chicken to a plate. The wine gives it a purplish hue.

cooked chicken on plate

Using a fork and knife, pull the skin off of the chicken (it should slide right off) and discard. The skin has served its purpose by lending flavor to the sauce and protecting the meat from drying out. You don’t have to do remove it, but it’s soggy at this point and I think the dish is more appetizing without it.

chicken with skin removed

Increase the heat in the Dutch oven/pot to medium and stir in three-quarters of the flour and butter paste.

adding beurre manié

Gently boil until the sauce is thickened, 5 to 7 minutes; add the remaining paste if you’d like the sauce a little thicker. Fish out and discard the bay leaf.

simmering sauce to thicken

Add the chicken and any accumulated juices back to the pot and simmer, uncovered, for about 10 minutes. Right before serving, stir in the browned mushrooms and pancetta. Taste and adjust seasoning, if necessary. Serve immediately or let cool, chill in the refrigerator, and reheat when ready to serve.

adding chicken. mushrooms, and pancetta back to pot

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the best type of wine to use for coq au vin?

The classic choice for coq au vin is a medium-bodied red wine, such as Burgundy or Pinot Noir, but any light or medium-bodied red wine, such as Merlot or Zinfandel, will work. You don’t need to use an expensive bottle; just make sure it’s a wine you’d enjoy drinking—no supermarket cooking wine!

Can I add pearl onions to this recipe?

Sure! I don’t include them in this recipe because they can be difficult to find, and I actually prefer the stew without them. If you’d like to add them, brown them in butter and cook them thoroughly before adding them to the finished stew as a garnish.

Can I make coq au vin ahead of time?

Absolutely! Coq au vin tastes even better when made ahead, as this allows the flavors to meld and deepen. Prepare the dish up to 2 days in advance, cool it to room temperature, and then store it covered in the refrigerator. Reheat gently on the stove, stirring occasionally, until heated through. For best results, store the sautéed mushrooms and crispy pancetta in separate containers in the refrigerator and add right before serving.

Can coq au vin be frozen?

Yes, coq au vin freezes very well. Once cooled, transfer the dish to an airtight freezer-safe container and freeze for up to 3 months. Thaw overnight in the refrigerator before reheating. When ready to serve, reheat slowly on the stove, stirring occasionally, until it’s heated through.

Video Tutorial

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Coq au Vin

Coq au vin is a hearty French stew of chicken braised in red wine with mushrooms and crisp pancetta.

Servings: 4
Prep Time: 30 Minutes
Cook Time: 1 Hour 40 Minutes
Total Time: 2 Hours 10 Minutes

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 4 ounces diced pancetta (or bacon)
  • 8 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs (about 4 pounds), trimmed of excess skin (see note)
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 large yellow onion, roughly chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, roughly chopped
  • ¼ cup Cognac
  • 2½ cups red wine, preferably Burgundy or Pinot Noir
  • 2½ cups chicken broth
  • 1½ tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1½ teaspoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves (or 1 teaspoon dried)
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 3 large carrots, peeled and cut into ½-inch chunks on the bias
  • 8 ounces sliced cremini mushrooms
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
  • 4 tablespoons all-purpose flour

Instructions

  1. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large (5-qt) Dutch oven or heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Add the pancetta and cook until the fat has rendered and the pancetta is crispy, 5 to 8 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the pancetta to a paper-towel-lined plate, leaving the fat in the pan.
  2. Season the chicken all over with 2 teaspoons salt and ½ teaspoon pepper. Increase the heat to medium-high and brown half of the chicken in a single layer, skin side down, until golden and crispy, about 5 minutes (brown on the skin side only). Using tongs, transfer the chicken to a plate; set aside. Repeat with the remaining chicken. Pour off all but about 2 tablespoons of the fat.
  3. Return the pot to the stove and reduce the heat to medium-low. Add the onions to the pot and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are softened and just starting to brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant, about 1 minute more. Add the Cognac and cook, stirring to scrape the brown bits from the bottom of the pan, until the Cognac has evaporated. Add the wine, chicken broth, tomato paste, balsamic vinegar, sugar, thyme, bay leaf, and ½ teaspoon salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium and gently boil, uncovered, for 15 minutes.
  4. Add the chicken and any accumulated juices from the plate back to the pot, along with the carrots. Bring to a simmer, then cover and cook over low heat for 30 minutes, or until the chicken and carrots are cooked through.
  5. While the chicken cooks, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the mushrooms and ¼ teaspoon salt and cook, stirring frequently, until the mushrooms are golden brown, about 5 minutes. Set aside.
  6. Also while the chicken cooks: In a small bowl, mash the softened butter and flour to make a smooth paste. Set aside.
  7. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the cooked chicken to a plate.
  8. Increase the heat in the Dutch oven/pot to medium and stir in three-quarters of the flour and butter paste. Gently boil until the sauce is thickened, 5 to 7 minutes; add the remaining paste if you'd like the sauce a little thicker. Fish out and discard the bay leaf.
  9. Using a fork and knife, pull the skin off of the chicken and discard.
  10. Add the chicken and any accumulated juices back to the pot and simmer, uncovered, for about 10 minutes. Right before serving, stir in the browned mushrooms and pancetta. Taste and adjust seasoning, if necessary, then serve.
  11. Note: Sometimes chicken thighs have excess skin and/or fat. Before cooking, using kitchen shears, trim any skin that extends farther than the edges of the chicken thigh, and snip off any excess fat.
  12. Make-Ahead Instructions: Let cool to room temperature and then store in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. Reheat over medium-low heat on the stovetop before serving. (For best results, store the sautéed mushrooms and crispy pancetta in separate containers in the refrigerator and add before serving.)
  13. Freezer-Friendly Instructions: This can be frozen for up to 3 months. Before serving, defrost the stew in the refrigerator for 24 hours and then reheat on the stovetop over medium-low heat until hot.

Pair with

Nutrition Information

Powered by Edamam

  • Per serving (4 servings)
  • Serving size: 2 chicken thighs
  • Calories: 1,470
  • Fat: 99 g
  • Saturated fat: 30 g
  • Carbohydrates: 32 g
  • Sugar: 11 g
  • Fiber: 3 g
  • Protein: 75 g
  • Sodium: 2,139 mg
  • Cholesterol: 432 mg

This website is written and produced for informational purposes only. I am not a certified nutritionist and the nutritional data on this site has not been evaluated or approved by a nutritionist or the Food and Drug Administration. Nutritional information is offered as a courtesy and should not be construed as a guarantee. The data is calculated through an online nutritional calculator, Edamam.com. Although I do my best to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates only. Varying factors such as product types or brands purchased, natural fluctuations in fresh produce, and the way ingredients are processed change the effective nutritional information in any given recipe. Furthermore, different online calculators provide different results depending on their own nutrition fact sources and algorithms. To obtain the most accurate nutritional information in a given recipe, you should calculate the nutritional information with the actual ingredients used in your recipe, using your preferred nutrition calculator.

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Comments

  • I recently tried this Coq au Vin recipe, and it was absolutely delicious! The flavours were so rich and perfectly balanced that it felt like we were dining in a fancy French restaurant. My husband couldn’t stop raving about it. The instructions were clear and easy to follow, making the cooking process a breeze. I will definitely be making this again. Merci for sharing such a fantastic recipe!

    • — Phindile Kelly on May 15, 2024
    • Reply
  • Absolutely delicious!! The directions are easy to follow and dish is worthy of company. I’m reminiscing for Paris and our river cruise on the Seine. This dish is better than anything we ate on the cruise ship. Bravo on another great recipe from Once Upon A Chef! You are my go to website for recipes.

    • — Susan Stinson on May 14, 2024
    • Reply
  • I have had this traditional French dish in France. When made well, it’s absolutely delicious with tender chicken and complex flavors. I am an adventurous cook and figured I’d give it a try.

    I made Coq au vin once using a recipe I found in The NY Times—it had >1000 reviews and a 5-star rating! How could I go wrong? My family enjoyed it, but I was disappointed. The chicken was not tender and the dish lacked flavor.

    Rather than giving up, I thought I would try a different recipe. Yours also boasted ~5 stars but included slightly different ingredients. Given my history with this dish, I meticulously followed the directions.

    I am happy to report that the dish was incredibly flavorful with tender chicken. My family ate every bit of it. My neighbor, who is also French, joined us for dinner and raved about it. I paired it with garlic, thyme mashed potatoes.

    This recipe will be on regular rotation! Next time I plan to make it with roasted potatoes.

    Thank you!!!!

    • — Michael on April 30, 2024
    • Reply
  • AMAZING! I made this yesterday and came out fantastic! It took me twice as long as indicated here but that’s just because I was listening to music and slowly going through each step methodically and cleaning dishes as I went. I used an Oregon pinot noir for the recipe but for the meal, my husband paired it with a Burgundy and it was a match made in heaven!

    (Based on the comments, I used 2 cups of chicken broth and 3 cups of wine. I also increased the chicken thighs from 4 lbs to 6 lbs since reviewers said there was a lot of liquid left over and the chicken fit my 5 quart Dutch oven with no issues.)

    • — JeanetteO on April 14, 2024
    • Reply
  • I’ve only seen Coq au Vin eaten in a movie so I have nothing to compare it too. That being said I thought it was delicious. I did omit the mushrooms and thyme since I have some picky eaters who don’t like either. I also used cornstarch instead of flour as we’re (trying) to consume less gluten. My dad is not a fan of wine but even he enjoyed it. I had one kid who thought it was too sweet but odds wise that is a win for a meal at my house. I am going to use the recipe sans chicken and substitute a roast next time. I served it over mashed potatoes and with a side of broccolini. Thank you for a wonderful recipe. I can’t wait to try more!!

    • — Sarah on March 24, 2024
    • Reply
  • I am an avid cook, and have had this meal in France. Cooking times, seasoning and thickening are way off. At the end of the day, just a lot of work and bland. Bright spot, I bought a great burgendy snd enjoyed it while cooking. This is a major investment, either you haven’t really made it, or you have dead tastebuds!

    • — R on March 23, 2024
    • Reply
  • Great recipe.

    For those who want more of lustrous mouth feel if using store-bought broth, add a couple tbsp. of unflavoured gelatine at the start of the process before adding it. Gives it time to hydrate and give a great texture to the final product.

    • — Lewis Carroll on March 17, 2024
    • Reply
  • Is it alright to leave out the sugar and balsamic vinegar? Will it change the taste very much? Excited to make this Saturday!

    • — Laura on March 13, 2024
    • Reply
    • Hi Laura, I like what they add, but it’s fine to omit them; any change to the flavor will be very subtle. Enjoy!

      • — Jenn on March 14, 2024
      • Reply
      • Thanks, making it right now and will go with your expertise!

        • — Laura on March 16, 2024
        • Reply
  • Just made this today and one word….Wow! The depth of flavor from the layering of ingredients and cooking is truly something special. Thank you so much for the detailed instructions, which goes a long way when making a fantastic recipe like this. Thank you!!

    • — Nick Chin on March 3, 2024
    • Reply
  • do you have suggestions on how to make this gluten free? Possibly potato starch?

    • — Shari on February 2, 2024
    • Reply
    • Hi Shari, I’d just use gluten-free flour for the beurre blanc.

      • — Jenn on February 2, 2024
      • Reply
  • Excellent recipe! I made this with no changes to the recipe. Came out perfect.

    • — Micki on January 24, 2024
    • Reply
  • Worth the time and effort! It was easy to prepare, I followed the instructions and the results were outstanding—even the people who only like white meat loved this. The chicken fell off the bone! Served with mashed potatoes, Jenn’s green beans with shallots, and French apple cake for dessert. Amazing!

    • — kenda macfadyen on January 21, 2024
    • Reply
  • Takes a little time, but well worth. Incredible flavor.

    • — Jeff on January 18, 2024
    • Reply
  • Hi Jenn
    I’m going to make this recipe for the 1st time this weekend. I have prosciutto left from the holidays. Would it be ok to use that instead of pancetta?
    Thank you!

    • — Nancy J Picklap on January 18, 2024
    • Reply
    • Sure – enjoy!

      • — Jenn on January 19, 2024
      • Reply
  • Hi Jenn. This is one of our favourite recipes. We’re planning to make it for a dinner where one of the diners has some dietary restrictions. Would using gluten free flour for the buerre be an issue?

    • — Mike on January 15, 2024
    • Reply
    • Glad you like it! The buerre blanc will be fine with gluten-free flour.

      • — Jenn on January 16, 2024
      • Reply
      • I made this for a dinner party and it was a hit. I cook a lot so usually make a recipe my own but I followed it pretty much. Now the guests want this recipe. I only had bone free chicken thighs which was OK. But the guests did not care. Better with bone in but no time to go buy them so used what I had.

        • — Russet Coviello on March 12, 2024
        • Reply
  • I had family for a January Sunday dinner and this was perfect!. I have made the Julia Child recipe and prefer your use of chicken broth instead of the beef broth. I did add a few more carrots – only because we like them and they add a nice color. I also added them a bit later.

    I made this in the morning and then reheated it up near dinnertime. Added mashed potatoes and your harticot verts with shallots as easy and delicious accompaniments.

    Another delicious go to from your website – thank you!

    • — Cheryl from NJ on January 15, 2024
    • Reply
  • I don’t eat bacon, will there be a big difference in flavour if I omit it, or should I look for turkey or beef bacon?

    • — Rob on January 12, 2024
    • Reply
    • Hi Rob, Turkey bacon should work nicely but you could also just omit the pancetta; it will still be delicious.

      • — Jenn on January 12, 2024
      • Reply
  • Amazing! I made it as written and it was fantastic!

    • — Alicia on December 26, 2023
    • Reply
  • Jenn,
    I made the Coq au Vin last night for Christmas dinner. It was outstanding, and very easy to follow. Everyone loved it; I look forward to doing many more of your recipes.

    • — Nicholas F on December 26, 2023
    • Reply
  • 2 thumbs up. Outstanding. Followed recipe with the exception of the cognac as didn’t have any. Googled substitute and came up with whiskey. Thank you

    • — Carol on December 23, 2023
    • Reply
  • Jenn, I love all your recipes and so do my guests. Thank you for them! I was wondering, I have guests coming that don’t eat beef or pork. The butcher suggested maybe using lamb sausage to mimic the pancetta. What do you think? Thanks so much for any advice!

    • — Tamara on December 21, 2023
    • Reply
    • Hi Tamara, so glad you like the recipes! You could certainly use the lamb sausage if you’d like. Turkey bacon would also work. Last, you can just omit the pancetta. (It will still be delicious.) Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on December 21, 2023
      • Reply
  • Last night I hosted a dinner party of 8 and made 3 of Jenn’s recipes…Coq au Vin, Creamy Make-Ahead Mashed Potatoes and Roasted Beet Salad with Goat Cheese, Walnuts & Honey-Dijon Vinaigrette. Smashing success! I doubled the Coq au Vin recipe but as it turns out, my guests eat like birds! So you know what that means…I have a whole other batch all to ourselves (and am heating it up as I type!). The potato recipe serves 8 and worked well without doubling. I made everything a day or 2 ahead of time, including the salad dressing, and am so glad. I followed all 3 recipes to a “T” and they all turned out perfect and delicious. Thank you Jenn for responding so quickly and graciously to my emails asking for advice on the salad pairing (and substitute for someone that doesn’t like beets!). Next up…pasta e fagioli served with celery, toasted walnut and pecorino salad and garlic & herb ciabatta (Once Upon a Chef cookbook, page 68). Enjoy!

    • — Dina McCullough on December 20, 2023
    • Reply
  • Made this recipe last night for a small dinner party of 5. I had to eliminate the bacon for religious reasons and it was delicious. The sauce easily handled 2 more chicken thighs. It is a great recipe for entertaining! Made it with mashed red potatoes and French green beans. Thank you!

    • — Maria Pasceri on December 19, 2023
    • Reply
  • First, you’re my “go to” chef. You do such an excellent job of teaching how to make a recipe. I’ve learned a lot from you and get regular kudos for the (read that “your”) dishes I serve.

    This was no exception — well, yes — a regular guest said this was the BEST dish yet that I’ve served. It was perfection all the way. The sauce was particularly rich and creamy. I’ve never done the flour in butter like that and now understand why the French developed that technique. No lumps; just lots of creamy gravy.

    Thanks, Jenn. I’ll keep reading and learning from you.

    • — Diana Faith Adair on December 17, 2023
    • Reply
  • I made this last night for company and everyone loved it! I stuck to the recipe except added an extra thigh (plenty of sauce, so didn’t have to adjust other ingredients) and used 3 c wine and 2 c chicken broth because I didn’t want to open another box of broth. Absolutely delicious and I will definitely make again!!!

    • — Laura on December 10, 2023
    • Reply
  • I’m making this for guests who are lactose intolerant. Can I substitute a plant butter for the real butter in the recipe without changing the overall taste of the dish much?

    • — Pam on November 29, 2023
    • Reply
    • Sure, that should be fine — hope everyone enjoys!

      • — Jenn on November 30, 2023
      • Reply
  • Really, really good! I wrote a review, but not sure if I rated it.

    • — Julia Kearney on November 20, 2023
    • Reply
  • This is absolutely delicious! Since it’s just my husband and me, I halved the ingredients, except for the carrots and mushrooms. I didn’t want to buy a bottle of cognac just to deglaze, so I used a splash of sherry. It’s such a comforting dish on a chilly night and the house smelled amazing. Have everything prepped ahead and sip on some of that Pinot as you’re cooking! I also made Jenn’s Make Ahead Mashed Potatoes as everything else was simmering. Even though I made half the recipe, we still have another dinner waiting for us tonight. Sadly, the Pinot is gone…

    • — Julia Kearney on November 20, 2023
    • Reply
  • Your recipe looks fabulous! Just wondering if I could use turkey thighs instead of chicken? Perhaps partially cook the turkey first so it is cooked through? Thank you!

    • — Lori on November 19, 2023
    • Reply
    • Hi Lori, I think you could use turkey thighs in place of the chicken. Instead of cooking them in advance, I’d follow the recipe; you’ll just need to cook them longer once you add the turkey back to the pot. I’d love to hear how it turns out if you make it!

      • — Jenn on November 21, 2023
      • Reply
  • Best recipe ever! I followed exactly and the seasoning was PERFECT!

    • — Sarah on November 18, 2023
    • Reply
  • Hi Jenn, I want to make this for 8 people. Please tell me how to do this without having to make the recipe twice. Thank you so so much

    • — Barbara Riddle on November 12, 2023
    • Reply
    • Hi Barbara, you can double it and cook it all at once; you’ll just need a larger dutch oven or pot. Hope everyone enjoys!

      • — Jenn on November 14, 2023
      • Reply
      • Can I omit the Cognac? I don’t have any on hand.

        • — Linda on November 18, 2023
        • Reply
        • Sure, Linda, that’s fine. Enjoy!

          • — Jenn on November 20, 2023
          • Reply
      • Excellent! Easy to make.
        It’s a keeper recipe

        • — Sheryl on December 1, 2023
        • Reply
  • Hi! I followed this recipe exactly as described and felt it came out great. However, after eating it my husband got very sick. I am worried it may have occurred when the chicken was browned but then sat partially raw for the other steps. Does that seem possible? I hate to lose this dish from our routine.

    • — mel on October 21, 2023
    • Reply
    • Hi Mel, I’m truly sorry to hear about your husband’s experience! The short time in which the chicken sits out would not be an issue. Many factors can lead to food upset, such as cross-contamination, other ingredients, or even meals consumed earlier. Symptoms can show up hours (or even days!) after consumption, so the cause might not be the most recent meal. Hope that helps and he feels better!

      • — Jenn on October 21, 2023
      • Reply
  • Can I use boneless and skinless chicken thighs in this recipe and if so, how would I need to modify the recipe?

    • — Mark on October 15, 2023
    • Reply
    • Hi Mark, The bones in the chicken add a lot of flavor, so using boneless thighs will have an impact on the finished dish. Also, you won’t need to cook the chicken as long so it won’t get quite as infused with the other flavors. Last, it’s pretty hard to find boneless chicken thighs that have skin on them. All that said, technically you can do it!

      • — Jenn on October 16, 2023
      • Reply
    • Oh my goodness Jenn, this was off the charts good! Followed recipe as is, ended up cooking recipe an extra 30min for fall of the bone chicken. Everyone raved. We are living in Paris now and I have to say this is better than any other coq au vin we’ve eaten locally. Merci beaucoup!

      • — Jennifer on November 5, 2023
      • Reply
  • This was absolutely delicious! I have made it the harder way (Julia Child’s recipe) and this was just as good. Thanks for providing a simpler version of the classic.

    • — Kelly Frost on October 13, 2023
    • Reply
  • This is delicious, however I started prepping at 4:15PM and wasn’t ready to put food on the table until 7:20, so it took a little over 3 hours total. I found it didn’t really come out like a “stew” because the sauce was still very liquid, not thick enough, even after using the flour/butter paste and allowing for reduction. I loved the flavors and will definitely try this again, however I would make a variation to turn it into more of my idea of a stew by taking all the meat off the bones, adding more carrots and mushrooms, and maybe even some potatoes, thickening the sauce more also.

    • — Rita S on October 9, 2023
    • Reply
  • lovely but print is too small can you enlarge it and put on 2 pages thanks

    • — sylvia garratt on October 1, 2023
    • Reply
    • Hi Sylvia, as of now, I don’t have the functionality on the blog to change the size of the text, but I believe there are some settings you can use when printing that will adjust the size.

      • — Jenn on October 2, 2023
      • Reply

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