Glazed Oatmeal-Maple Scones with Pecans & Currants

Tested & Perfected Recipes

These delicious scones from Flour bakery are studded with pecans and currants and topped with a maple glaze.

oatmeal scones

These comforting breakfast treats are like a cross between scones and oatmeal cookies: buttery and tender inside, crisp and craggy outside, and chockfull of oats, pecans and currants. The recipe is the first I tried from Joanne Chang’s wonderful cookbook, Flour: Spectacular Recipes from Boston’s Bakery & Cafe, and it was love at first (and second, and third) bite.

What you’ll need to make Glazed Oatmeal Maple Scones

how to make scones

How to make Glazed Oatmeal Maple Scones

Begin by combining the dry ingredients in the bowl of a stand mixer.

how to make scones

Mix for a few seconds to blend.

dry-ingredients-mixed

Add the butter in chunks. Be sure it is very cold.

adding-butter

Beat with the paddle until the butter is somewhat mixed in and broken down into grape-sized pieces.

mixing-in-butter

Whisk together the egg, maple syrup and heavy cream in a small bowl.

whisking-cream-egg-and-maple-syrup

Add it to the mixing bowl.

adding-wet-ingredients

And beat until just incorporated, about 20 seconds. Be sure not to overmix — you want small pieces of butter to remain intact.

mixing-wet-with-dry

Scoop the batter into a baking sheet.

how to make scones

Then bake for about 25 minutes, or until golden.

baked

Cool on a rack.

cooling-on-rack

Meanwhile, make the glaze by combining the Confectioners’ sugar, maple syrup and water.

making-glaze

Then drizzle over cooled scones.

Glazed-Oatmeal-Maple-Scones

Note: My only changes to the original recipe were to use currants instead of golden raisins (only because that’s what I had on hand); reduce the baking time by 15 minutes (possibly a typo in the book?); and halve the glaze (I found them to be plenty sweet with that amount).

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Glazed Oatmeal Maple Scones with Pecans & Currants

These delicious scones from Flour bakery are studded with pecans and currants and topped with a maple glaze.

Servings: 8 scones
Total Time: 45 Minutes

Ingredients

For the Scones

  • 1-1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 1-1/4 cups old-fashioned rolled oats (not quick cooking or instant)
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup pecan halves, toasted (if desired) and chopped
  • 1/2 cup currants (or raisins)
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut into 10 pieces
  • 1/3 cup cold heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup maple syrup
  • 1 cold egg

For the Glaze

  • 1/2 cup confectioners' sugar
  • 3 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons water

Instructions

  1. Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Using a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (or a handheld mixer), mix together the flour, oats, baking powder, baking soda, salt, pecans and currants on low speed for 10 to 15 seconds. Scatter the butter pieces over top and beat on low speed for about 30 seconds, or until the butter is somewhat broken down and grape-size pieces are still visible.
  3. In a small bowl, whisk together the cream, maple syrup and egg until thoroughly mixed. Pour the cream mixture into the butter mixture and mix on low speed for about 20 seconds, or just until the dough comes together. It will be fairly wet.
  4. Remove the bowl from the mixer stand. Scrape the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula to ensure that all of the dry ingredients are incorporated into the dough. Using an ice cream scooper, drop mounded scoops of the dough (about 1/3 cup each) onto the prepared baking sheet, forming 8 scones and spacing them about 2 inches apart.
  5. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until scones are golden brown around the edges and lightly golden on top. Transfer to a wire rack to cool for about 30 minutes. (Hold on to the parchment paper -- you'll need it for adding the glaze.)
  6. While the scones are cooling, make the glaze: In a small bowl, whisk together the confectioners' sugar, maple syrup and enough of the water to make a smooth, pourable glaze. When the scones have cooled for at least 30 minutes, transfer them back to the parchment-lined baking sheet and use a spoon to drizzle the glaze evenly over top.
  7. Freezer-Friendly Instructions: The dough can be frozen for up to 3 months: Scoop the dough into mounds on a baking sheet, let set in the freezer, then place in a sealable bag and press out as much air as possible. Bake as needed directly from the freezer. (Allow 1 to 2 minutes longer in the oven.) To Freeze After Baking: Let the scones cool completely and store in an airtight container separating layers with parchment paper or aluminum foil. Before serving, remove the scones from the container and let them come to room temperature. **If you have the option to freeze the scones before or after baking them, you will get the best results if you freeze them before baking.

Nutrition Information

Powered by Edamam

  • Serving size: 1 scone
  • Calories: 451
  • Fat: 22g
  • Saturated fat: 10g
  • Carbohydrates: 60g
  • Sugar: 30g
  • Fiber: 3g
  • Protein: 6g
  • Sodium: 200mg
  • Cholesterol: 67mg

This website is written and produced for informational purposes only. I am not a certified nutritionist and the nutritional data on this site has not been evaluated or approved by a nutritionist or the Food and Drug Administration. Nutritional information is offered as a courtesy and should not be construed as a guarantee. The data is calculated through an online nutritional calculator, Edamam.com. Although I do my best to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates only. Varying factors such as product types or brands purchased, natural fluctuations in fresh produce, and the way ingredients are processed change the effective nutritional information in any given recipe. Furthermore, different online calculators provide different results depending on their own nutrition fact sources and algorithms. To obtain the most accurate nutritional information in a given recipe, you should calculate the nutritional information with the actual ingredients used in your recipe, using your preferred nutrition calculator.

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Reviews & Comments

  • I first made these for my family. My daughter can’t have nuts or wheat, so I eliminated the pecans and used gluten free flour. They were delicious and were gobbled up in no time. I also switched the amount of cream with the amount of syrup. Still delicious. Then I made the recipe as is for a work potluck. They immediately disappeared and I was told by a few people that they don’t generally like scones because they are dry, but these weren’t! Many asked for the recipe and I directed them to your site. Thank you for a super yummy scone recipe!

    • — Susan Groller on October 7, 2018
    • Reply
  • Made your scones yesterday with coconut oil – no butter in the house, and they were delicicous – thanks for another great recipe. I preordered your book , and am looking forward to it!

    • — Sandra Kuykendall on March 8, 2018
    • Reply
    • Glad you enjoyed, Sandra – and thank you for pre-ordering my book. Hope you find lots of new favorites in it. 🙂

      • — Jenn on March 8, 2018
      • Reply
  • I have searching for a great scone recipe and think I have found it with these! Very easy to make however I cut my butter up smaller and added dried cranberries and cinnamon chips (bought them online at King Arthur flour). These are highly addictive and glad I made one to “test” and will make a few for hubby and me tonight The rest are rationed and now frozen. I will be trying your chocolate chip scone recipe next…good thing I work out!

    • — Joann on March 6, 2018
    • Reply
  • I love this recipe! The only thing I did differently is replace currants with raisins (no currants at the store.) I missed the triangle shape so the second time I made the (again with raisins; store promises to stock currants) I tweaked them into a triangle shape for the purists. They are still great!

    • — Carol Hill on February 1, 2018
    • Reply
  • Can these be made in a food processor?

    • — Kimberley on January 25, 2018
    • Reply
    • Hi Kimberley, Most scones can be made in a food processor but not these – the blade will grind the oats. Sorry!

      • — Jenn on January 26, 2018
      • Reply
  • Would half & half work in lieu of heavy cream?

    • — Dale on January 19, 2018
    • Reply
    • Yes, Dale, I think that should work. Enjoy!

      • — Jenn on January 23, 2018
      • Reply
  • These were received with rave reviews! Oatmeal scones are my favorite but they are usually so sticky to deal with – these are no exception but the scooping method took care of that. I missed the traditional triangle shape but the tender crumb with great texture from the currants/pecans/oats more than made up for it. I liked that these weren’t over the top sweet. Perfect.

    • — Lynnessa Struble on November 18, 2017
    • Reply
  • I have probably made these scones easily 20 times. Every one loves them! They have become my “signature” thank you in my neighborhood. My only change is to leave out the water in the glaze. Thank you for making “me” a great baker. Regards.

  • Greetings from Canada,
    Love the scones. The English scones of my childhood were always made with currants. Your recipe is lighter and tastier. Our new favorite recipe. Great thank you !!!
    Delicious Wishes
    Yvonne Adams

  • Can you make these ahead of time? Make the dough and portion out then freeze raw and bake when needed?

    • Yep, that will work 🙂

  • Truthfully, I love these. I mean, LOVE these as does my 17 month old and hubby. Jury is still out with the 3yo, but he seems only to want to exist on cottage cheese and fruit so there ya go. I have now made these about 5-6 times since November 2016 and my hubby wants them as a weekly staple. Soooo happy! ?❤️

  • Could these be adapted with a Gluten free flour mix?

  • These turned out perfect, even my super picky 4 yr old liked them. Thank you!

  • These were really tasty. I’ve already made them twice. The texture is nice, too.

  • Came across your website looking for scone recipe. These were great. Thank you!

  • Yummy scones! I tweaked the recipe a little. Replaced the heavy cream with evaporated milk and the maple syrup with a mixture of sweetened condensed milk plus brown sugar. Turned out great and not too sweet. I omitted the glaze and ate them with strawberry jam. Mmmmm…

  • My favorite scone recipe! Sometimes I add a little bit of maple extract to the glaze to punch up the maple flavor.

  • These are delicious. I can’t believe how easy they are to make and how delicious they turned out. Incredible! Thank you so much.

  • Loved these, only adjustment I made was to add a Tablespoon of cream cheese to the icing, my husband prefers a thicker glaze. Made them this morning and the smell awoke everyone in the house.

  • What is the best temp to bake these at? Thanks!

    • Hi Kit, They should be baked at 350°F.

  • These are my new favorite! They are amazing, even without the glaze. I’ll be making these again and again!

  • are steel-cut oats a possibility?

    • I’d stick with old fashioned rolled oats as steel oats would be very crunchy.

  • Love scones! I can’t wait to try these! B)

  • Would love to try these scones, However, would like to eliminate the maple syrup. What would be a good substitute?

    • Hi Mary Lou, You could sub brown sugar or honey.

  • Jenn, can these be made a day a head or so of when I would be serving them? Do they need to be kept in an air-tight container or in the refrigerator? I am thinking of making them for a “Coffee with Neighbors” that our community holds once a month.

    • Hi Patricia, They are best served fresh out of the oven but if you need to make them ahead of time you can refresh them in a 300 degree oven for about 5 minutes. I’d wait to add the glaze until you are ready to serve them. Hope that helps!

  • These look delicious! I have been making a very similar scone from one of Ina Garten’s cookbooks and it has been a staple in our house and a great home baked gift to give to others. Thanks for another take on this.

  • I’m in love with scones! Sounds like a great recipe and love that you used currants

  • These look really tasty! I love the Flour cookbook, and the bakeries! It is so hard to exercise self control in there.

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