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Plum Galette

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With a flaky, buttery crust folded over juicy plums, this rustic plum galette makes a lovely summer dessert.

Whether you call it a rustic plum tart (American), a plum galette (French), or a plum crostata (Italian), you’re going to love this gorgeous summer dessert. With a crackly pastry crust folded over a filling of luscious purple plums, it’s essentially a free-form pie baked on a sheet pan, and it has a deliciously high crust-to-fruit ratio. If you’re intimidated by making your own crust, don’t be! My all-butter tart crust is easy to make, very forgiving, and comes together in less than one minute in a food processor. It makes a fabulous base for any fruit tart. Although, if you have crust-lovers in your house like I do, beware of late-night snackers who steal the pleated crust and leave you with only the center of the tart.

What You’ll Need To Make a Plum Galette

Plum Galette Ingredients

As you can see, the ingredients for this plum galette are very basic, which allows the flavor of the plums to shine. Don’t be tempted to load up the tart with extra plums; stone fruits give off a ton of juice, which can leak from the tart and make a mess of the crust and your pan.

The purpose of the almonds is twofold: they add flavor and also help absorb some of those plum juices.

How To Make A Plum Galette

Step 1: Chop the Almonds

finely chopped almonds

In the bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel blade, process the almonds until finely chopped, about 1 minute. Transfer the almonds to a small bowl and set aside.

Step 2: Make the Galette Dough

flour, sugar, and salt in crust

To the bowl of the food processor (no need to clean it), add the flour, salt and sugar. Pulse briefly to combine, then add the cold butter.

adding butter to flour mixture

Process just until the butter is the size of peas, about 5 seconds.

butter mixed into flour

Sprinkle the cold water over the mixture and process until just moistened and very crumbly, about 5 seconds.

crumbly galette dough

Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface.

crumbly dough on counter

Knead the dough a few times, just until it comes together into a cohesive ball, then pat the dough into a disk.

patting dough into a disc

Flour your work surface again and dust the dough with flour, as well. Using a rolling pin, roll into a circle 8 to 10 inches in diameter, turning and adding more flour as necessary so the dough doesn’t stick. Transfer the dough to the parchment-lined baking sheet and refrigerate while you prepare the plums (you’ll roll the dough out further on the parchment paper so go ahead and clean your work surface).

rolling dough into a circle

Step 3: Prep the Plums & Assemble the Galette

sliced plums

Cut the plums into 1/4-in-thick slices; set aside.

Take the dough from the fridge and slide the parchment paper onto the countertop. Roll the dough, directly on the parchment paper, into a 13-in circle about 1/8-in thick. It’s fine if the edges are a little ragged.

rolling galette dough on parchment

Place the parchment and dough back on the baking sheet – the dough will run up the lip of the sheet slightly.

dough in pan

Sprinkle the flour evenly over the pastry, leaving a 1-in border. Sprinkle the chopped almonds evenly over the flour, followed by 1/4 cup of the granulated sugar.

flour, almonds, and sugar sprinkled over dough

Arrange the plum slices on top in overlapping concentric circles to within about 2-1/2 in of the edge. Don’t worry about making it look perfect; it doesn’t make much difference in the end and you don’t want the dough to get too warm.

plums arranged in overlapping pattern over dough

Sprinkle the remaining 1/3 cup sugar over the plums. Fold the edges of the dough over the plums in a free-form fashion, working your way around and creating pleats as you go. Patch up any tears by pinching a bit of dough from the edge.

Using a pastry brush, brush the pleated dough evenly with the beaten egg. Sprinkle the turbinado sugar over the top of the crust. Chill the assembled galette in the fridge for 15 to 20 minutes.

assembled galette ready to bake

Step 5: Bake

While the galette chills, preheat the oven to 350°F and set an oven rack in the center position.

Bake for 55 to 65 minutes, or until the plums are tender and the crust is golden brown. (It’s okay if some of the juices leak from the tart onto the pan. The juices will burn on the pan but the galette should be fine – just scrape any burnt bits away from the galette once it’s baked.) Transfer the pan to a rack and let cool.

While the galette cools, make the optional glaze. Place the apricot jam in a small, microwave-safe bowl and microwave until bubbling, 10 to 20 seconds. Using a pastry brush, brush the plums with the jam until glistening.

brushing apricot glaze over baked galette

Use two large spatulas to transfer the galette to a serving plate or cutting board. Slice and serve warm or at room temperature. The galette is best served on the day it is made, but leftovers will keep nicely, loosely covered on the countertop, for a few days.

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Plum Galette

With a flaky, buttery crust folded over juicy plums, this rustic plum galette makes a lovely summer dessert.

Servings: 8
Prep Time: 30 Minutes
Cook Time: 1 Hour
Total Time: 1 Hour 30 Minutes, plus 20 minutes to chill

Ingredients

For the Crust

  • 1½ cups all-purpose flour, spooned into measuring cup and leveled-off
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1½ sticks (12 tablespoons) very cold unsalted butter, cut into ½-inch pieces
  • ¼ cup very cold water

For the Filling

  • ½ cup sliced almonds
  • 1 lb plums (3 to 4, depending on size)
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup plus ⅓ cup granulated sugar
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 tablespoon turbinado or coarse sugar
  • 2 tablespoons apricot jam, best quality (optional)

Instructions

  1. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. In the bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel blade, process the almonds until finely chopped, about 1 minute. Transfer the almonds to a small bowl and set aside.
  3. Make the crust: To the bowl of the food processor (no need to clean it), add the flour, salt and sugar. Pulse briefly to combine. Add the cold butter and process just until the butter is the size of peas, about 5 seconds. Sprinkle the cold water over the mixture and process until just moistened and very crumbly, about 5 seconds.
  4. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface and knead a few times, just until it comes together into a cohesive ball. Pat the dough into a disk. Flour your work surface again and dust the dough with flour, as well. Using a rolling pin, roll into a circle 8 to 10 inches in diameter, turning and adding more flour as necessary so the dough doesn’t stick. Transfer the dough to the parchment-lined baking sheet and refrigerate while you prepare the plums (you’ll roll the dough out further on the parchment paper so go ahead and clean your work surface).
  5. Assemble the galette: Cut the plums into ¼-in-thick slices. Take the dough from the fridge and slide the parchment paper onto the countertop. Roll the dough, directly on the parchment paper, into a 13-in circle about ⅛-in thick. It’s fine if the edges are a little ragged. Place the parchment and dough back on the baking sheet – the dough will run up the lip of the sheet slightly.
  6. Sprinkle the flour evenly over the pastry, leaving a 1-in border. Sprinkle the chopped almonds evenly over the flour, followed by ¼ cup of the granulated sugar. Arrange the plum slices on top in overlapping concentric circles to within about 2½ in of the edge. Don’t worry about making it look perfect; it doesn’t make much difference in the end and you don’t want the dough to get too warm. Sprinkle the remaining ⅓ cup sugar over the plums.
  7. Fold the edges of the dough over the plums in a free-form fashion, working your way around and creating pleats as you go. Patch up any tears by pinching a bit of dough from the edge.
  8. Using a pastry brush, brush the pleated dough evenly with the beaten egg. Sprinkle the turbinado sugar over the top of the crust. Chill the assembled galette in the fridge for 15 to 20 minutes.
  9. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350°F and set an oven rack in the center position.
  10. Bake for 55 to 65 minutes, or until the plums are tender and the crust is golden brown. (It’s okay if some of the juices leak from the tart onto the pan. The juices will burn on the pan but the galette should be fine -- just scrape any burnt bits away from the galette once it’s baked.) Transfer the pan to a rack and let cool.
  11. While the galette cools, make the optional glaze. Place the apricot jam in a small, microwave-safe bowl and microwave until bubbling, 10 to 20 seconds. Using a pastry brush, brush the plums with the jam until glistening.
  12. Use two large spatulas to transfer the galette to a serving plate or cutting board. Slice and serve warm or at room temperature. The galette is best served on the day it is made, but leftovers will keep nicely, loosely covered on the countertop, for a few days.
  13. Make-Ahead Instructions: The dough can be made up to 3 days in advance and refrigerated. Allow it to sit at room temperature for about 15 minutes or until pliable before rolling.
  14. Freezer-Friendly Instructions: The assembled tart may be frozen for up to 3 months. To freeze, place the baking sheet in the freezer until the tart is frozen, then wrap tightly. Bake directly from the freezer. (It may take a few extra minutes to bake from frozen.)

Nutrition Information

Powered by Edamam

  • Per serving (8 servings)
  • Serving size: 1 slice
  • Calories: 399
  • Fat: 21 g
  • Saturated fat: 11 g
  • Carbohydrates: 50 g
  • Sugar: 27 g
  • Fiber: 2 g
  • Protein: 5 g
  • Sodium: 158 mg
  • Cholesterol: 66 mg

This website is written and produced for informational purposes only. I am not a certified nutritionist and the nutritional data on this site has not been evaluated or approved by a nutritionist or the Food and Drug Administration. Nutritional information is offered as a courtesy and should not be construed as a guarantee. The data is calculated through an online nutritional calculator, Edamam.com. Although I do my best to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates only. Varying factors such as product types or brands purchased, natural fluctuations in fresh produce, and the way ingredients are processed change the effective nutritional information in any given recipe. Furthermore, different online calculators provide different results depending on their own nutrition fact sources and algorithms. To obtain the most accurate nutritional information in a given recipe, you should calculate the nutritional information with the actual ingredients used in your recipe, using your preferred nutrition calculator.

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Comments

  • So delicious. I made it as written except when putting the sugar on top of the plums I only did 1/4 cup, not 1/3. It set up perfectly and everyone loved it. Thanks for a wonderful recipe to use my inlaws fresh plums!

    • — Gentry on September 5, 2022
    • Reply
  • Hiya Jenn,

    Made this for my family dinner right before my most recent heart surgeries. I used pluots, found at Sprout’s and the result was very well received indeed. I used a bit less sugar
    and left out the apricot jam glaze. The egg wash and turbinado sugar were perfection.

    The pastry was tasty and crispy, just like you’d find in Paris. Will do this again using plums or peaches.
    Thanks and cheers,
    Jim

    • — Jim McCarthy on September 2, 2022
    • Reply
  • I want to make this, but wonder if you know what plum variety is best for it. My husband’s family owns an orchard and grows plums. There are various types, and I assume some might be better than others for baking. The Italian plum, Simka, Fortune are all varieties my husband speaks of. Any thoughts on what works best for this?

    • — April on August 28, 2022
    • Reply
    • Hi April, I’m not familiar with simka or fortune, but I usually use black plums for this. Does that help?

      • — Jenn on August 30, 2022
      • Reply
      • Thank you, Jenn. I plan on making the galette this weekend. I saw a few comments saying they made it with Italian plums, and those are plentiful on the family orchard, so that will be what I use. From the comments, sounds like a winner!

        • — April on September 2, 2022
        • Reply
  • Hi Jenn,
    I made your tart with plums and loved the taste. But I had trouble with the crust. I used 1:1 King Arthur gluten-free flour but the crust seemed too crumbly. It didn’t hold together well.
    Any idea what I may be off on?
    Thanks!
    Love all your recipes!
    Heide

    • — Heide on August 27, 2022
    • Reply
    • Hi Heide, Maybe the gluten-free flour needed just a little more liquid to bring the dough together. If you try this again and experience the same thing, I’d add some water, bit by bit, until it gets to a more workable consistency. Please LMK how it turns out if you try it again!

      • — Jenn on August 30, 2022
      • Reply
  • Hi Jenn

    Are there any changes you would recommend to make this with peaches as opposed to plums? Peaches are beautiful right now and I am having trouble finding good plums for it.

    • — Jane on August 25, 2022
    • Reply
    • Hi Jane, Peaches should work nicely here without any other modifications. I’d love to hear how it turns out!

      • — Jenn on August 25, 2022
      • Reply
    • This is another follower. I can’t find plums this year but do have lots and lots of peaches. I just figured an stone fruit would do and any jam will do.
      So I used peaches and a combo of apricot and peach preserves. Made a double batch and share with neighbors. A very big yum.

      • — Ann Marriott on August 25, 2022
      • Reply

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