Tuna Poke Bowls

5 stars based on 8 votes

tuna poke bowls

Last weekend, after visiting our son at sleepaway camp, Michael and I spent a few days at The Lodge at Woodloch, a spa/resort in the Poconos. It was beautiful — and I love all that Zen spa stuff — but Michael joked that it was named “Woodloch” because they lock you in the woods with nothing to do and starve you with teeny-tiny portions. Spa cuisine: sooo not his thing. But portions aside, we both enjoyed some wonderful food, including tuna poke, a traditional Hawaiian salad of raw tuna marinated in soy sauce, sesame oil, and onions. I wasn’t at all surprised to see this dish on the menu since poke is all the rage and poke shops seem to be popping up everywhere.

I have a tuna poke appetizer in my cookbook but this one, served over sushi rice and loaded with your favorite toppings, is meant to be a meal. It’s spa cuisine for sure, but since you’re making it yourself, you can have as much as you like. And I put potato chips on mine — sounds weird, I know, but they make a delicious (and easy) substitute for crispy fried wontons.

how to make tuna poke bowls

When selecting your tuna, be sure to get fresh, sushi-grade yellowfin or bigeye tuna (both referred to as “ahi”), with a pink or reddish color. Locally (in the Washington, DC area), I’ve found fresh ahi tuna at Harris Teeter. Also, Whole Foods carries frozen yellowfin tuna that works nicely. Just be sure not to buy Albacore tuna, which is the white tuna used to make canned tuna fish.

how to make tuna poke bowls

To begin: In a medium bowl, whisk together the soy sauce, vegetable oil, sesame oil, honey, sambal oelek, ginger, and scallions.

how to make tuna poke bowls

Add the tuna and toss. Let the mixture sit in the fridge for at least 15 minutes or up to 1 hour.

how to make tuna poke bowls

To serve, scoop rice into bowls, top with tuna poke and desired toppings.

how to make tuna poke bowls

My Recipe Videos

Tuna Poke Bowls

Servings: 4 to 6
Prep Time: 20 Minutes
Total Time: 20 Minutes, plus at least 15 minutes to marinate

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons soy sauce (use gluten-free if necessary)
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1 tablespoon Sambal Oelek (see note)
  • 2 teaspoons fresh grated ginger
  • 3 scallions, white and green parts, thinly sliced
  • 1 pound sushi-grade ahi tuna (such as yellowfin or big-eye tuna), diced into 1/4 or 1/2-inch pieces
  • 2 cups sushi rice, cooked according to package instructions (any other type of rice or grain can be substituted)

Optional Toppings

  • Sliced avocado
  • Sliced cucumber
  • Edamame
  • Pickled ginger
  • Diced mango
  • Potato chips or wonton crisps
  • Sesame seeds

Instructions

  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together the soy sauce, vegetable oil, sesame oil, honey, sambal oelek, ginger, and scallions. Add the tuna and toss. Let the mixture sit in the fridge for at least 15 minutes or up to 1 hour.
  2. To serve, scoop rice into bowls, top with tuna poke and desired toppings. You will have extra sauce for drizzling over the toppings; serve on the side.
  3. Note: Sambal Oelek can be found in the Asian section of most supermarkets. It is sometimes labeled Chile Garlic Sauce.
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Nutrition Information

Powered by Edamam

  • Per serving (Nutritional data does not include optional toppings -- 6 servings)
  • Calories: 411
  • Fat: 8 g
  • Saturated fat: 1 g
  • Carbohydrates: 59 g
  • Sugar: 6 g
  • Fiber: 0 g
  • Protein: 24 g
  • Sodium: 943 mg
  • Cholesterol: 29 mg

This website is written and produced for informational purposes only. I am not a certified nutritionist and the nutritional data on this site has not been evaluated or approved by a nutritionist or the Food and Drug Administration. Nutritional information is offered as a courtesy and should not be construed as a guarantee. The data is calculated through an online nutritional calculator, Edamam.com. Although I do my best to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates only. Varying factors such as product types or brands purchased, natural fluctuations in fresh produce, and the way ingredients are processed change the effective nutritional information in any given recipe. Furthermore, different online calculators provide different results depending on their own nutrition fact sources and algorithms. To obtain the most accurate nutritional information in a given recipe, you should calculate the nutritional information with the actual ingredients used in your recipe, using your preferred nutrition calculator.

Reviews & Comments

  • I got confused and bought ingredients for your book tuna poke not this one . Can I beefthe book version up with rice, edamame beans and can I add the Korean spice ?

    - Lee Ann on September 16, 2018 Reply
    • Definitely!

      - Jenn on September 16, 2018 Reply
  • 4 stars

    While this was delicious, I had to give it 4.5 stars instead of five only because the tuna poke in the cookbook is the best thing my husband and I have eaten. My husband was actually mad while I was making this because it was not the other one and why mess with success. Having said that, this recipe is very good. But if you are looking at this recipe because you like tuna sashimi, my advice is to go buy the cookbook if only for that recipe it’s worth it!

    - Janet on August 31, 2018 Reply
  • Can you use salmon instead of tuna??

    - Mary pasto on July 31, 2018 Reply
    • Sure, Mary – salmon would be excellent too.

      - Jenn on July 31, 2018 Reply
  • 5 stars

    Five Star Recipe! At Jenn’s suggestion, I made these for company. At the same time, I served the Coconut Fried Shrimp. I was nervous about frying, as it is not a cooking preference for me. It all worked with the prep ahead and the shrimp were not one bit greasy. The Poke bowls were a huge hit! I topped the meal off with the Blueberry Boy Bait Cake and creme fraiche. All just perfect~pure Jenn genius!!

    - Liz B. on July 30, 2018 Reply
  • Hi Jenn, all the recipes for poke bowls I’ve seen use vinegar in the marinade. Have you found you prefer to leave it out? Thanks!

    - Mila on July 28, 2018 Reply
    • Hi Mila, I don’t think this recipe needs it but you could certainly add some rice vinegar or lime to taste — just keep in mind that acid will “cook” the fish unless you add it at the last minute. Hope that helps!

      - Jenn on July 28, 2018 Reply
  • 5 stars

    This recipe is absolutely delicious. I’m lucky that I can get fresh sushi grade tuna on a regular basis. I’ve served it the night I made it AND the next night, and the only difference was more intense flavor the second time. A personal note–I’m not a fan of ginger so I cut it in half, and it was still amazing. Also, when I made sushi rice, I added seasoned vinegar at the end, and this made the entire dish quite delicious. Yum!

    - JoAnna on July 19, 2018 Reply
  • I love your husband’s honesty. LOL hahaha

    - Kristen Berry on July 16, 2018 Reply
  • 5 stars

    Can it be eaten next day too? Will the tuna still be ok?

    - Jeanette on July 15, 2018 Reply
    • Hi Jeanette, I think it really depends on how fresh the fish was when you purchased it (which you may not necessarily know). To be conservative, I’d air on the side of not eating it on the second day (also, it would get really salty by the second day as it continues to absorb the marinade).

      - Jenn on July 18, 2018 Reply
  • 5 stars

    YUM, YUM, YUM. Another winner, Jen.

    - Jane C. on July 15, 2018 Reply
  • 5 stars

    I made this tonight, and it was excellent! (as are all of Jenn’s recipes!) It was surprisingly quick and easy, and I will definitely be making again.

    - Julie on July 14, 2018 Reply
  • 5 stars

    This recipe has a great flavor profile. It was a bit spicier than I was expecting. I have had poke bowls in restaurants that had less or no spice. As a result, I think this should be called Spicy Tuna Poke Bowl. When I make it again, I’ll certainly use the sriacha but probably a bit less.

    - Mary on July 14, 2018 Reply
  • 5 stars

    Really a delicious recipe! My family wolfed it down. I was suspicious about the honey but it balanced the flavors well. I served with mango, avocado, shaved cabbage, more chopped scallions, toasted coconut, and siracha mayo. Will definitely make this again and will try the potato chips on top too!

    - Drew on July 13, 2018 Reply
  • Will it work with salmon?

    - Angela on July 12, 2018 Reply
    • Yep!

      - Jenn on July 12, 2018 Reply
  • I am from Hawaii and your recipe is spot-on authentic. The trick is getting the fresh, raw ahi.

    Unfortunately, I cannot each sushi, sashimi or poke as often as I would like. Now that the West has discovered the joy of raw game fish (marlin, tuna), we are eating the creatures to extinction.

    - Amalie on July 12, 2018 Reply
  • Could you please tell me where to enter the contest for the cutting board? The page says to enter below, but there isn’t any place to enter or I am not seeing it. Thank you

    - Vicky on July 12, 2018 Reply
    • Hi Vicky, you can find it here. Scroll down the page and you’ll see a box with your entry options. Good luck!

      - Jenn on July 12, 2018 Reply
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