How To Make Perfect Hard-Boiled Eggs (Without The Green Ring)

Tested & Perfected Recipes

how to make hard boiled eggs

Hard-boiled eggs are easy to make, but they’re also incredibly easy to mess up. There are a million and one ways to make them but this method makes perfect hard-boiled eggs every time: the whites are firm but not rubbery and the yolks are cooked through but still creamy, with no unsightly green ring surrounding them. For easy peeling, try to use older eggs. The fresher the egg, the more attached the shell, so eggs that have been in the fridge for a week or two will be much easier to work with. Also, keep in mind that I use standard large eggs — for smaller or larger eggs, the cook time would need to adjusted by a minute or so in either direction.

Begin by placing the eggs in a saucepan large enough so that they sit in a single layer. Fill the pan with enough cold water so that it covers the eggs by about an inch. It’s important to start the eggs in cold water — bringing the water and eggs up in temperature together ensures even cooking and prevents cracking. Bring the water to a rolling boil over high heat, then immediately remove the pan from the heat.

Cover, and let stand for 10 minutes.

how to hard boil an egg

Carefully pour out the hot water.

Then place the pan in the sink and run cold water over the eggs until the pan is lukewarm, 1 to 2 minutes. Drain and refill with cold water; let stand until the eggs are room temperature, about 10 minutes.

Gently crack the eggs all over and peel under running water.

The eggs can be cooked and peeled 3 days ahead. If you keep the eggs in their shell, they can last for up to a week. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

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Hard Boiled Eggs

Servings: Up to a dozen eggs
Cook Time: 20 Minutes
Total Time: 20 Minutes

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Place the eggs in a saucepan in a single layer, and fill the pan with enough cold water so that it covers the eggs by about an inch.
  2. Bring to a rolling boil over high heat, then remove the pan from the heat, cover, and let stand for 10 minutes.
  3. Carefully pour out the hot water; place the pan in the sink and run cold water over the eggs until the pan is lukewarm, 1 to 2 minutes. Drain and refill with cold water; let stand until the eggs are room temperature, about 10 minutes. Gently crack the eggs all over and peel under running water.
  4. Make Ahead: Eggs can be cooked and peeled 3 days ahead. If you keep the eggs in their shell, they can last for up to a week. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.
  5. Tip: When peeling an egg, start at the wider end -- there's usually a small air pocket in there, which makes the egg shell easier to remove.

Comments

  • These eggs came out perfectly! Thank you for easy to follow instructions. It is NOT necessary however to use running water to shell the eggs. I used the cold water in the pot. Worked great and no wasting water!

    • — Linda Stettler on October 26, 2018
    • Reply
  • I cannot thank you enough for this step-by-step process on making hard boiled eggs. I have literally been on the “hunt” for the perfect way to make hard boiled eggs. I have tried EVERYTHING and nothing seemed to work for me until NOW!!! Thank you, Jenn!!! I made the eggs exactly as you laid out and they came out beautifully. I sincerely thank you for sharing your recipes, tips, and always being so kind and gracious in your response to everyone. I bought your book months before it even hit the press. I’m going through it right now and it is just fantastic.

    My mom unexpectedly died a year ago and she was always my “go-to girl” for so much. We shared a love for cooking and baking over the last 4 decades. I introduced her to your website and we would try out different recipes on your site. It was so much fun. I no longer can call her and ask her how to make something. Though, in a very unexpected way, you have actually filled that void for me with all of your fabulous recipes and input. Thank you from the bottom of my heart. Your expertise and practical sense for making foods taste amazing, has been a true blessing. I pray that you are blessed beyond measure.

    • — Shannon on October 15, 2018
    • Reply
    • Shannon, what a touching note! I’m so sorry about your sudden lost but I feel honored that I’ve been able to (in a very small way) fill the void that your mom left. ❤️ (And glad that the hard-boiled eggs technique worked nicely for you!)

      • — Jenn on October 16, 2018
      • Reply
  • I tried other recipes for hard boiled eggs. This is the best. Thank you. Your Caesar salad was also a hit.

    • — Jane ferrell on July 3, 2018
    • Reply
  • I’m a pretty good cook ( thanks to you) but have never gotten the hang of hard boiled eggs. I have tried countless recipes and methods. Anyway, I made them according to your instructions and they were perfect! Thanks again for a winning recipe.

    • — Sandy N on June 1, 2018
    • Reply
  • Hi Jen,

    I was a bit skeptical about the method (no boiling time meant soft boiled eggs for me), but I’m happy to report they’re perfect!
    I’ll use them for this Hungarian meal:

    http://www.hungariantidbits.com/hungarian-layered-potato-rakott-krumpli/

    Thank you for the recipe!

    • — Ildiko on October 27, 2017
    • Reply
  • Notice that you don’t list baking temps as for convection . Do you use just regular oven temps? We just love All of your recipes !!!! 👍

    • — Shirley Gignac on October 20, 2017
    • Reply
    • Hi Shirley, Glad you like the recipes! I use a standard oven setting for all my recipes as not everyone as convection ovens.

      • — Jenn on October 20, 2017
      • Reply
  • Adding a little salt to the water helps make them easier to peel.

  • Hi Jenn,

    I seem to have better results steaming the eggs around 12 minutes and after cooling in water for 5 minutes or so, the shells just slip off. Have you tried this technique and if so what was your experience, good or bad?

    Thanks,
    David

    • Hi David, I haven’t used this method, but I’ve read about it (maybe on Cook’s Illustrated?). It may be a bit less common because a lot of people don’t own steamer baskets. Thanks for sharing your method!

      • — Jenn on October 20, 2017
      • Reply

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