Easy High-Heat Roast Turkey with Gravy

Tested & Perfected Recipes
Easy Roast Turkey with Gravy

The high-heat method is my favorite way to roast turkey. The bird cooks quickly and emerges from the oven juicy and crisp-skinned.

The high-heat roasting method is my favorite way to cook a turkey. The prep time is minimal, the cooking time is short, and the turkey emerges from the oven juicy and crisp-skinned. The only drawback is that the high heat can cause a little smoke in the kitchen, so be sure your oven is spotless prior to cooking — and, while the bird roasts, turn on your exhaust fan and crack a window.

Note that this method works best for turkeys under 14 pounds. For Thanksgiving, I typically make one roast turkey along with a rolled stuffed turkey breast (a make-ahead family favorite) so we have variety and plenty of leftovers. Finally, if you’re a turkey novice or cooking a turkey feels intimidating, check out my best turkey advice — it will make you feel better!

What you’ll need to make roast turkey with Gravy

easy roast turkey with gravy

How to make roast turkey with Gravy

To begin, remove and discard truss that holds turkey legs together. Trim off and discard any excess fat in the neck or body cavity. Remove giblets and neck; discard or save for stock.

easy roast turkey with gravy

Rinse turkey inside and out with warm water. Pat dry with paper towels. Place a V-shaped rack in a 13 x 16 x 3-inch heavy stainless-steel roasting pan. (Do not use a dark roasting pan or a disposable aluminum pan.)

Rub the turkey skin all over with the olive oil and sprinkle with the salt and pepper. Set the bird breast-side-up on the rack. Pull the wings away from the body, then firmly twist them to push the wing tips under the bird.

easy roast turkey with gravy

Using aluminum foil, form caps over the tips of the end of each drumstick. (Do not tie the legs together, add stuffing, or close the body cavity.) Insert a digital leave-in meat thermometer near the center of the breast through thickest part until the tip touches the bone. Turn on your exhaust fan and crack a kitchen window.

easy roast turkey with gravy

Place the turkey in the oven and roast, without basting, until the thermometer reaches 160°F, 1 to 1-1/2 hours. Halfway through roasting time, rotate the pan in the oven to assure even cooking and browning. (If at any point your kitchen gets unbearably smoky or the fat is spitting, pour a cup of tepid water in the roasting pan. Just keep in mind that liquid will create steam, which prevents the skin from getting as crispy.) Remove the pan from the oven.

easy roast turkey with gravyUsing oven mitts that you don’t mind getting dirty, carefully tilt the turkey so that the juices from the cavity run into the roasting pan. Transfer the turkey to a platter or cutting board (do not clean the roasting pan), tent the turkey with foil, and let it rest for 20 to 30 minutes. This will allow the internal temperature to reach at least 165°F (the USDA safe-cooking temperature for turkey) and the juices to settle.

easy roast turkey with gravy

How To Make Gravy

While the turkey rests, make the gravy: Place the roasting pan over a burner on your stove. (Be careful handling the pan, as the handles will be hot.) Skim away any excess fat or solids that have accumulated in the pan.
easy roast turkey with gravy

Add the broth and cook over medium heat, scraping the bottom of the pan with a whisk or wooden spoon to loosen any brown bits, until simmering. Turn off the heat and set aside.

easy roast turkey with gravy

In a medium saucepan, melt the butter over medium-low heat.

easy roast turkey with gravy

Add the onions.

easy roast turkey with gravy

Cook until very soft and translucent, about 15 minutes. Do not brown.

Add the flour.

easy roast turkey with gravy

Whisk and cook for 2 to 3 minutes, stirring occasionally.

easy roast turkey with gravy

Whisk in the turkey dripping-chicken broth mixture and Cognac and cook, uncovered, stirring occasionally, for about 5 minutes until thickened.

easy roast turkey with gravy

Stir in the cream (if using) and chopped herbs. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper, if necessary.

easy roast turkey with gravy

Transfer to a gravy bowl. Carve the turkey and serve with the gravy on the side.

Easy Roast Turkey with Gravy

You may also like

Easy High-Heat Roast Turkey With Gravy

The high-heat method is my favorite way to roast turkey. The bird cooks quickly and emerges from the oven juicy and crisp-skinned.

Servings: 8 to 10
Total Time: 2 Hours

Ingredients

  • 1 fresh turkey (11 to 14 lbs)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2-1/4 cups chicken broth
  • 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter
  • 1-1/2 cups finely chopped yellow onion, from 1 large yellow onion
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons Cognac or brandy
  • 1 tablespoon heavy cream, optional
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh herbs (such as thyme, sage, rosemary, or parsley)

You Will Need:

  • 13 x 16 x 3-inch heavy stainless-steel roasting pan
  • V-shaped roasting rack
  • Leave-in digital meat thermometer, like this one

Instructions

  1. Before cooking, be sure that your oven is VERY clean to prevent smoking. Preheat the oven to 450°F and set an oven rack in the lowest position.
  2. Remove and discard truss that holds turkey legs together. Trim off and discard any excess fat in the neck or body cavity. Remove giblets and neck; discard or save for stock.
  3. Rinse the turkey inside and out with warm water. Pat dry with paper towels. Place a V-shaped rack in a 13 x 16 x 3-inch heavy stainless-steel roasting pan. (Do not use a dark roasting pan or a disposable aluminum pan.) Rub the turkey skin all over with the olive oil and sprinkle with the salt and pepper. Set the bird breast-side-up on the rack. Pull the wings away from the body, then firmly twist them to push the wing tips under the bird. Using aluminum foil, form caps over the tips of the end of each drumstick. (Do not tie the legs together, add stuffing, or close the body cavity.) Insert a digital leave-in meat thermometer near the center of the breast through the thickest part until the tip touches the bone.
  4. Turn on your exhaust fan and crack a kitchen window. Place the turkey in the oven and roast, without basting, until the thermometer reaches 160°F, 1 to 1-1/2 hours. If your oven has hot spots, rotate the pan halfway through cooking to assure even browning. (If at any point your kitchen gets unbearably smoky or the fat is spitting, pour a cup of tepid water in the roasting pan. Just keep in mind that the liquid will create steam in the oven, so the skin won't be quite as crispy.)
  5. Remove the pan from the oven. Using clean oven mitts (that you don't mind getting dirty), carefully tilt the turkey so that the juices from the cavity run into the roasting pan. Transfer the turkey to a platter or cutting board (do not clean the roasting pan), tent the turkey with foil, and let it rest for 20 to 30 minutes. This will allow the internal temperature to reach at least 165°F (the USDA safe-cooking temperature for turkey) and the juices to settle.
  6. While the turkey rests, make the gravy: Place the roasting pan on a burner on your stove. (Be very careful handling the pan; it's easy to forget that it's hot.) Skim away any excess fat or solids that have accumulated in the pan. Add the broth and cook over medium heat, scraping the bottom of the pan with a whisk or wooden spoon to loosen any brown bits, until simmering. Turn off the heat and set aside.
  7. In a medium sauce pan, melt the butter over medium-low heat. Add the onions and cook until very soft and translucent, about 15 minutes. Do not brown. Whisk in the flour and cook for 2 to 3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Whisk in the turkey dripping-chicken broth mixture and Cognac and cook, uncovered, stirring occasionally, for about 5 minutes or until thickened. Stir in the cream (if using) and chopped herbs. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper, if necessary. Transfer to a gravy bowl.
  8. Carve the turkey and serve with the gravy on the side.
  9. Make-Ahead Instructions: If you don't mind losing the crispy skin, the turkey can be roasted and carved ahead of time. Pour a thin layer of the gravy into an ovenproof serving platter. Arrange the carved turkey nicely on top of the gravy; cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for up to two days. Refrigerate the remaining gravy in a separate container. To reheat: remove the plastic wrap and cover the platter with aluminum foil. Place in a 325°F-oven for 20 to 30 minutes, until the turkey is hot. Reheat the gravy in the microwave or on the stovetop.

Pair with

See more recipes:

Comments

  • This was the first time I roasted a turkey, and I highly recommend it for anyone else, whether for the first time or those with more experience. The gravy was excellent. Frankly, no one in my family likes turkey all that much. We generally find the white meat too dry and while the legs while moist, the tendons are too much to deal with. As a result, I could not give this recipe five stars, but the recipe was easy. We have two ovens, but the relatively short time to roast made preparation easier. I plan to use the gravy recipe for other poultry such as roast duck.

    • — Brian J Hostetler on November 26, 2021
    • Reply
  • Hi Jenn,
    I just realized that I have a 20 lb. turkey, but I still want to use your recipe (and not the dry brine). Is there anything I can do to make it work out OK?

    • — Samuel Goldenberg on November 23, 2021
    • Reply
    • Unfortunately, this recipe really won’t work for a 20 pound turkey — sorry!

      • — Jenn on November 23, 2021
      • Reply
      • Absolutely brilliant
        Just moved to a house with a much better vented oven and 450 causes no smoke etc

        11lb Turkey in and out of oven in 90
        Mins. Stood for about 45
        Perfection

        • — Jeanette on November 26, 2021
        • Reply
  • Hi Jen, I’m excited to try this recipe on Thursday! I was wondering, if I wanted to spice it up a little bit, is it ok to mix up a spice and butter mixture and rub it under the skin? Or do you think it will just burn from the high heat and not worth the effort? Thanks!

    • — Hafsa on November 23, 2021
    • Reply
    • Hafsa, I wouldn’t recommend the butter b/c as you mentioned, I think it will cause it to burn. Sorry!

      • — Jenn on November 23, 2021
      • Reply
      • How about spices in olive oil? Should I worry abt the spices burning? Thank you!

        • — Hafsa on November 23, 2021
        • Reply
        • I would avoid adding anything to the turkey; instead I would add spices to the gravy.

          • — Jenn on November 24, 2021
          • Reply
  • Can this recipe be prepared using a countertop electric roaster?

    • — Mary York on November 19, 2021
    • Reply
    • Hi Mary, I’ve never used an electric roaster so I can’t say for sure but assuming it has room to hold the turkey/roasting pan, I assume it should be okay. Just make sure it’s VERY clean to prevent smoking.

      • — Jenn on November 20, 2021
      • Reply
  • I have limited oven space. Is it okay to prepare this turkey recipe using a countertop electric roasting oven?

    • — Mary York on November 19, 2021
    • Reply
    • Hi Mary, It’s hard to say as I’m not sure how it will do at such a high temperature. You could try it and if it starts to smoke, just turn the heat down a bit.

      • — Jenn on November 19, 2021
      • Reply
  • I thought I would give this recipe a try, big mistake. I used a Butterball turkey like I have for the last 20 years. The high heat method and short cooking time ruin the bird, it was tough, chewy, and a complete disappointment. I followed the recipe exactly, and the bird did reach an internal temperature of 160 degrees. I let it rest for the required 20 minutes and it did rise to 165 degrees. However, the shorter high temperature cooking method did not give adequate time for the breast thighs and legs to adequately relax that typically will happen with a longer cooking time.

    • — Mark L on November 17, 2021
    • Reply
  • Hello. I have an All-Clad roasting pan with a v-shaped rack, but the interior is a dark nonstick material, not light stainless. Will this work? Why does the recipe advise against using a dark pan? I love your recipes and use them often! Many thanks.

    • — Cathy Amoroso on November 16, 2021
    • Reply
    • Hi Cathy, so glad you like the recipes! That pan should work – it’s those dark speckled pans that a lot of people have that cause problems. Enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 16, 2021
      • Reply
  • when the recipe calls for a fresh turkey, is it okay to use a completely thawed previously-frozen turkey?

    • — Mary York on November 15, 2021
    • Reply
    • Yep 🙂

      • — Jenn on November 15, 2021
      • Reply
  • I will be roasting a turkey for Thanksgiving for the first time. (I’ve roasted duck legs in the past but, when we were visiting assisted living communities for my mother-in-law shortly after Thanksgiving last year, one of the communities gave us a turkey as a thank you. I assumed they must have had fewer people show up for Thanksgiving dinner and had to unload them. Needless to say, we were not expecting to be given a turkey, and I suspect we looked like a deer caught in headlights when they handed us the turkey. So now, by golly, I am determined to roast that thing.) I noticed in the reviews and your comments that some people found the legs to be undercooked. I saw a similar high-heat recipe on the web that instructed that thermometers should be stuck in the fleshy part of each leg (not the breast), not touching the bone, and each should be allowed to register 170 degrees before removing the turkey from the oven. I would welcome any comments you might have as to whether this risks the breast/white meat becoming dried out. The reason I have made duck legs in the past is that my wife, and more so my daughter, do not like white meat because it is too dry. Is the prudent approach to measure the temperature in the breast, examine the legs and cook them longer if necessary. I have three three, remote read thermometers that I could use for each leg and the breast. Any thoughts on covering the breast with foil once it reaches 160 degrees? I’d just as soon keep everything as simple as possible given everything else I am trying to coordinate, including baking your wild mushroom dressing, which we enjoyed last year. Thank you.

    • — Brian J Hostetler on October 25, 2021
    • Reply
    • Hi Brian, I’ve never had a problem with that but if you’re concerned, you could put meat thermometers in both the breast and the legs. Once the breast hits the necessary temperature, if the legs aren’t cooked enough, remove the turkey from the oven, cut the legs off the turkey, and put them back in the oven. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on October 27, 2021
      • Reply
      • Thank you.

        • — Brian J Hostetler on October 29, 2021
        • Reply
      • Thank you.
        Separately, thank you for thoughtfully posting pictures. Quite helpful.

        • — Brian J Hostetler on October 29, 2021
        • Reply
        • Glad you find them helpful!

          • — Jenn on November 1, 2021
          • Reply
  • Hello Jenn,
    I am a novice cook and wanted to double check the oven setting. I realize this recipe is called “Roast” Turkey so should I use the oven in Roast mode or Bake mode? Would you recommend using convection as well?
    Thank you very much.

    • — EricD on October 16, 2021
    • Reply
    • Hi Eric, I would use the bake mode in your oven. I would not recommend the convection setting as the fan tends to dry out meat. Hope that clarifies!

      • — Jenn on October 18, 2021
      • Reply
  • Hi Jenn, I’m just wondering, should we baste the turkey with this recipe??? And if so how often??

    • — Bruce on August 22, 2021
    • Reply
    • Hi Bruce, The high-heat method does not require basting (and it is not recommended). Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on August 23, 2021
      • Reply
  • I’m not the one who makes the turkey at thanksgiving, my mother in law has her secret recipe. This year I made it with this recipe with the word Easy in the title I thought I could manage it. It was absolutely easy and delicious. The gravy was a hit with the family as well. My father in law who had complained when I last made the turkey 15 years ago cooking in a bag thought this was better than his wife’s!! My son who hates thanksgiving meal asked why don’t I make turkey more often it was so delicious. That’s a compliment to chef Lisa! I’ve kept this recipe for the future and they may have me make again! Enjoy

    • — Kim Schubert on January 29, 2021
    • Reply
  • This past Thanksgiving was my first year ever cooking a Turkey and making the whole dinner by myself. This recipe was so clear and helpful. The turkey and gravy turned out better than I could have hoped (especially since it was my first time cooking a turkey) and I will definitely not be needing to try any other recipes in future years. This will always be my go-to! The skin was so crispy and delicious and the meat was the perfect texture!

    • — Ceylan Myers on January 28, 2021
    • Reply
  • Question

    Jenn:
    we have a 20lb bird ( turkey).
    And I do not have time to prepare the oven, meaning cleaning before.
    I’m concerned over the amount of time the turkey will need to roast at high heat.

    What are your thoughts or suggestions?
    Also, unstuffed is it 10 min., or 15 per pound?
    Thanks for consistently answering our questions. I learn so much from others comments & questions- as I do my own.

    • — Lisa on December 23, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Lisa, I don’t recommend this method for a 20-lb bird. You might try this recipe (and I’d cook it at 325°F for 3.5 to 4 hrs).

      • — Jenn on December 23, 2020
      • Reply
      • Thank you so much !!!!!

        Lisa

        • — Lisa on December 23, 2020
        • Reply
      • Hello Jenn,
        Do you recommend this recipe for a 6 pound turkey? Thanks!

        • — Michele on October 8, 2021
        • Reply
        • Hi Michele, Yes, it will work with a turkey that size. It will obviously take less time to cook, so make sure you use a meat thermometer. Hope you enjoy!

          • — Jenn on October 11, 2021
          • Reply
  • This is fantastic. I don’t think I’ll ever make roast turkey any other way. Much easier than wet-brining in buckets and meat is incredibly moist.

    • — Anne Moul on December 22, 2020
    • Reply
  • If you are skeptical about this method, I encourage you to try it! This was my first Thanksgiving making the turkey, so, of course, I turned to Jenn to see what she suggests! When I told my mom I was trying this, she said the turkey would probably end up burned on the outside and not done on the inside. I also read a lot of the reviews and was a tad worried about smoke, since I had an almost 16-lb turkey and a dark roasting pan (not speckled). Even with all of that, this turkey was perfect! I didn’t have a problem with smoke or my roasting pan (although I made the gravy in a pot, not my pan), and my husband couldn’t stop commenting on how moist and delicious it turned out. Thanks, Jenn, for helping me make my first turkey!!!

    • — Karen on November 28, 2020
    • Reply
  • I made this yesterday and it was my FIRST time ever making a whole turkey. I was incredibly nervous, but Jenn’s never lead me astray, and didn’t fail me this time! I asked her so many questions leading up to the big day and she was so helpful in the comments! My turkey turned out perfectly! I had my boyfriend’s parents over to keep things small and they were raving about how juicy and perfectly cooked the turkey was. Skin was crispy and perfectly golden! I even wrote down Jenn’s website and sent it home with his Mom! haha! I do feel Jenn should add an extra item on the “ingredient” list…..heavy duty oven cleaner! just kidding! She sure wasn’t joking around that things do get smokey, even with a clean oven. Good thing I had plenty of ventilation. Thank you Jenn – this is my official go to recipe from now on and I’m going to be sure to continue to pass along your website to people who are looking for help on their first turkeys!

    • — Stacey on November 27, 2020
    • Reply
  • Found the best method to enjoy a truly moist and delicious turkey. Love all your recipes but fail to comment. Always go to your site first to find a recipe I need. Thank you!

    • — Debbie Smith on November 27, 2020
    • Reply
  • Great turkey roasting method! And quick and easy too. My 12.5 lb turkey looked just like the picture. The breast meat was perfect, not dry at all, but not overly moist either. And the gravy was delicious too! I also cooked Jenn’s make ahead mashed potatoes the day before Thanksgiving. My family said they were the best potatoes I’ve made yet. Thanks Jenn!

    • — Jane on November 27, 2020
    • Reply
  • Tried this on Thanksgiving and it was overall fast, but an hour and a half didn’t quite cook it as my bird was 14 pounds. I placed it on a v rack and the underside of the turkey was not fully cooked. Not sure if I should of started it bottom up and then maybe flipped it over halfway as I had to put it back in and took about 2 hours. The gravy was great and easy to make, I ended up using almost 30 ounces of chicken broth as I had to dilute the saltiness.

    • — Karen C on November 27, 2020
    • Reply
  • Hi Jenn! As with every holiday, our menu consisted of several of your recipes. Your name has come up at every occasion that someone compliments a dish I make…. “THANKS! It’s a Jenn Segal recipe.” You have NEVER steered me wrong (and I don’t believe you did this time either), but I do need some advice. The Easy High Heat Turkey was a hit tonight and your instructions were great. I had a 10 lb Whole Foods turkey and followed your steps, including rotating my stainless steel roasting pan with the turkey halfway through for even cooking, using a probe thermometer and taking the turkey out when it was 160. When I took ot out, the pop up button hadn’t popped up yet. The temp got to 166 F once I tented. When I went to carve, both wing joints were bloody and the surrounding meat was undercooked. I was so confused how it could look so magazine perfect on the outside and like this on the inside. I cut it into parts, covered with foil and put back in the oven on 350 for probably 40 mins and it looked much better, registering in the 180s. Lucky for the out-of-this- world gravy or it would’ve been incredible dry.
    What do you think went wrong? I’d be so disappointed to never know because I’d love to make it again!
    Thanks!

    • — Amy on November 26, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Amy, sorry to hear that you had a problem with the wings on the turkey! While not very often, I’ve heard that mentioned before. Dark meat cooks more slowly than white meat so if you experience that again, I would cut the breasts off the turkey, tent them to keep them warm, and stick the dark meat back in the oven until it’s cooked through. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on November 27, 2020
      • Reply
  • I love this method and it is my 3rd year for doing it this way. I have even had an 18# bird and it was successful. I do all the recommended steps: clean oven, open window, etc. I have even had a floor fan on the ready. My first year I sorta obsessively watched Safeway video and read many reviews. I was very nervous but it has been a success each time! Thanks Jenn!

    • — Holly on November 26, 2020
    • Reply
  • Sorry but this method didn’t work too well for me. I cooked exactly as written but the meat on the drumsticks was stuck to the skin and hard and couldn’t chew it. I used a meat thermometer to exactly 160 and let rest after cooking. It was a 14 lb butterball turkey that I normally have good luck with. Not sure what I did wrong since everyone raved about the method. I probably will go back to a cooking bag next time.

    • — Deb on November 26, 2020
    • Reply
  • I have an 11 pound bone-in turkey breast. Would the time be the same?

    • — Theresa on November 25, 2020
    • Reply
    • Yep 🙂

      • — Jenn on November 25, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi Jenn! My second question for today. I have a 16 pound turkey. Would you still recommend the high heat method? If not, how should I cook it?
    Thanks so very much! Tory

    • — Tory Meyer on November 25, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Tory, I think you could get away with a 16-lb turkey here, Kristiana; just reduce the heat to 425°F.

      • — Jenn on November 25, 2020
      • Reply
  • I am going to try this method for the first time this year. I think that I have loved every recipe that I have tried from you. You definitely have many of my go to recipes! What about herbed butter under the skin with this method? Good or no? Thanks in advance.

    • — Jason on November 24, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Jason, I don’t recommend butter for this recipe; the high heat will cause it to burn. So glad you enjoy the recipes! 🙂

      • — Jenn on November 24, 2020
      • Reply
  • How crucial is the cognac/brandy for the gravy? Not sure I want to buy an entire bottle for 2 tbsp but I will if necessary. Also, will my kids notice the taste?

    • — Joanna on November 22, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Joanna, I love the depth of flavor it adds (kids won’t notice it), but it’s perfectly fine to leave it out. Or you could add white wine instead if you’ve got a bottle open.

      • — Jenn on November 22, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi Jenn, I just asked you a question about how well your Turkey recipe reheats, regarding the lack of crispy skin, what if I used my creme brûlée torch on the skin?

    • — Stacey on November 22, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hmmm…I’ve never tried it so I can’t say for sure. I’d test it out on one piece and if you like the results, you can do the rest. Please report back with how it goes!

      • — Jenn on November 23, 2020
      • Reply
  • Can I use a glass Pyrex dish?

    • — Tonya on November 21, 2020
    • Reply
    • I don’t recommend it, Tonya – it may shatter. Sorry!

      • — Jenn on November 22, 2020
      • Reply
  • Happy Thanksgiving to all.

    Jen I enjoy your recipes and have shared many of them.

    I just made an early turkey for the family using the high heat method.
    The problem I find is that the top roasts well but under the turkey looks pale even though I know it’s cooked.

    When you say turn the turkey half way through to ensure it really roasts evenly, should I flip the turkey over so that the breast is on the bottom?

    Need help getting the underneath to roast.

    • — Anna B. on November 21, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Anna, Are you using a v-rack? This helps the bird brown underneath. But yes, if it’s too pale you can flip it over so the breast is on the bottom.

      • — Jenn on November 22, 2020
      • Reply
  • Jenn, I’d like to try the high heat roasting with my turkey this year. I have a heavy stainless roasting pan, but it has a flat roasting rack. How important is the v-shaped rack to this recipe? Hoping this recipe makes me a turkey fan!

    • — Christine H on November 21, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Christine, No worries — you can use the flat rack. Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 22, 2020
      • Reply
  • Could I do 2, 5-6 lb turkey breasts this way?

    • — Chesley on November 21, 2020
    • Reply
    • Sure, Chesley – that will work well.

      • — Jenn on November 22, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi Jen,
    I have an 18 lb turkey. Will this recipe work? How long would I cook it? Thanks for all you recipes!

    • — Corinne Osborne on November 19, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Corinne, This method works best for smaller turkeys because of the smoke issue but it’s doable with a bigger turkey if your oven is VERY, VERY clean and you use the right type of roasting pan. Also, be sure that no parts of the bird extend beyond the rim of the pan. (If any parts extend beyond the pan, the drippings will cause a LOT of smoke.) And if the turkey starts to get too dark on top toward the end, just cover it with foil. Hope that helps and please let me know how it turns out!

      • — Jenn on November 19, 2020
      • Reply

Add a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.