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Perfect Apple Pie

5 stars based on 24 votes

apple pie

Even with years of professional and home cooking experience, I still approach homemade pie with a bit of trepidation. I’ve said it before: whoever coined the term “easy as pie” had obviously never made a homemade pie! But making a delicious apple pie is totally doable as long as you have a tried and true recipe like this one. The key is to avoid the typical apple pie pitfalls — a soggy crust and waterlogged filling — by blind baking the crust and boiling down the juices before filling the pie. These steps add a bit of extra time but ensure a crisp and flaky crust and a cider-flavored filling that’s not the least bit watery. The perfect apple pie!

ingredients

Begin by making the crust. It’s easiest to use a food processor but you can also make it by hand if need be. Combine the flour, sugar, salt and baking powder in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade. (The baking powder is added to prevent the crust from shrinking during baking — it helps the crust expand into the pan rather than slip down the sides.) Pulse a few times to combine.

crust-1

Add the pieces of butter and shortening.

crust-2

Pulse until you have coarse crumbs with lots of pea and chickpea-size clumps of butter and shortening within.

crust-3

Add the water and pulse until the mixture is evenly moistened and very crumbly.

crust-4

Dump the crumbly dough out onto a clean work surface and divide into two piles, with one pile about 15% bigger than the other.

crust-5

Make two balls of dough and pat each one into a 5-inch disc. Wrap the discs in plastic and refrigerate for at least 45 minutes.

crust-6

Take the larger disc of dough out of the refrigerator. Dust your work surface lightly with flour and place the dough on top; sprinkle a little flour more over the dough. Use your hands to quickly knead the dough into a soft and malleable disc (don’t overwork it; you want it just supple enough to roll).

apple-pie-crust-7

Roll the dough, adding more flour as necessary under and on top of the dough so it doesn’t stick, into a 13-inch circle.

apple-pie-crust-8

Carefully drape the dough over the rolling pin and transfer it to a 9-inch deep-dish pie pan (at least 1-1/2 inches deep). Gently fit the dough into the pan, easing it inwards rather than stretching it outwards. Trim the edges to 1/2-inch beyond the lip of the pie pan. Turn the edges under to create a rim on the crust. Press the rim against the lip of the pan, forming it into an even edge as you work your way around. Use any scraps to patch in any tears or thin areas. Place the crust in the freezer for at least 15 minutes while you heat the oven to 375°F.

apple-pie-crust-9

Remove the pie crust from the freezer and cover with a piece of parchment paper. Fill the crust with dried beans or pie weights.

apple-pie-crust-10

Bake for 20 minutes, then remove the parchment paper and beans/pie weights and tent the edges with a few strips of aluminum foil. (The foil will protect the edges from getting too dark.) Bake for another 20 minutes, until the dough is dry and golden. Increase the oven temperature to 425°F.

apple-pie-crust-13

Meanwhile, combine the apples, lemon zest, lemon juice, granulated sugar, brown sugar, salt, and cinnamon.

apples-1

Toss until the sugar is dissolved and the apples are evenly coated. Let sit for at least 30 minutes.

apples-2

Drain the apples, collecting the syrupy juice in another bowl.

apples-3

Pour the juice into a 2-cup microwave-safe measuring cup.

apples-4

Heat on high power in the microwave until the juice is reduced by half, about 4 minutes. (Alternatively, you can boil the juices in a small pan on the stove.) The syrup should be just slightly thickened.

apples-5

Add the syrup back to the apples, along with the flour and cornstarch; toss to combine.

apples-6

Add the apple filling to the baked pie shell.

filled-apple-pie

Take the other piece of dough out of the fridge and roll into an 11-inch circle, using the same process described above. Place the dough over the apples and crimp the edges with a fork or flute with your fingers, sealing the top and bottom crust together. Work quickly as the heat from the pan will soften the dough. Brush the top crust with the egg wash and sprinkle some sugar over top. Cut a few slits in the top crust to allow the steam to escape.

ready-to-bake

Bake at 425°F for 15 minutes, then reduce the heat to 375°F, and bake for an additional 45 minutes, or until the top is brown and filling is bubbly. Let the pie cool completely on a wire rack before cutting, about 4 hours. Enjoy!

perfect-apple-pie-1

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Perfect Apple Pie

Servings: 8

Ingredients

For the Crust

  • 2-3/4 cups all-purpose flour, spooned into measuring cup and leveled with a knife
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon baking powder
  • 14 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, sliced into 1-inch pieces
  • ¼ cup cold vegetable shortening, in 4 pieces
  • 7 tablespoons ice cold water

For the Filling

  • 3.5 pounds baking apples (see note), peeled, cored, sliced ¼-inch thick
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest and 1 tablespoon lemon juice, from 1 lemon
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • 6 tablespoons packed dark brown sugar
  • Heaping ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch

For Baking

  • A beaten egg, cream, or milk, for brushing over crust
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar, for topping the pie

Instructions

For the Crust

  1. Combine the flour, sugar, salt and baking powder in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade. Pulse a few times to combine. Add the pieces of butter and shortening and pulse until the mixture is crumbly with lots of pea and chickpea-size clumps of butter and shortening within.
  2. Add the water and pulse until the mixture is evenly moistened and very crumbly. Dump the dough crumbles onto a work surface and divide into two piles, with one pile about 15% bigger than the other (13 oz and 11.5 oz). Make two balls of dough and pat each one into a 5-inch disc. Wrap the discs in plastic and refrigerate for at least 45 minutes.
  3. Take the larger disc of dough out of the refrigerator. Dust your work surface lightly with flour and place the dough on top; sprinkle a little flour over the dough. Use your hands to quickly knead the dough into a soft and malleable disc (don’t overwork it; you want it just supple enough to roll).
  4. Roll the dough, adding more flour as necessary under and on top of the dough so it doesn't stick, into a 13-inch circle. Carefully drape the dough over the rolling pin and transfer it to a 9-inch deep-dish pie pan (at least 1-1/2 inches deep). Gently fit the dough into the pan, easing it inwards rather than stretching it outwards. Trim the edges to 1/2 inch beyond the lip of the pie pan. Turn the edges under to create a rim on the crust. Press the rim against the lip of the pan, forming it into an even edge. Use any scraps to patch in any tears or thin areas. Place the crust in the freezer for at least 15 minutes while you heat the oven.
  5. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Set an oven rack in the middle position.
  6. Remove the pie crust from the freezer and place on a baking sheet (this makes it easy to move in and out of the oven). Cover the crust with a piece of parchment paper and fill it with dried beans or pie weights. Bake for 20 minutes. Take the crust out of the oven; remove the parchment paper and beans/pie weights and tent the edges with a few strips of aluminum foil. (The foil will protect the edges from getting too dark.) Bake for another 20 minutes, until the dough is dry and golden. Don't worry if the bottom puffs up; just press it down gently with a flat spatula, such as a pancake turner, taking care not to puncture it.
  7. Increase the oven temperature to 425°F.

For the Filling & Baking

  1. Meanwhile, combine the apples, lemon zest, lemon juice, granulated sugar, brown sugar, salt, and cinnamon. Toss until the sugar is dissolved and the apples are evenly coated. Let sit for at least 30 minutes.
  2. Drain the apples, collecting the syrupy juice in another bowl. Pour the syrupy juice into a 2-cup microwave-safe liquid measuring cup. Take note of the quantity and then heat on high power in the microwave, checking frequently, until the syrup is reduced by half. This will take about 4 minutes but keep a close eye on it as all microwaves are different. You don't want to cook it for too long, or it will turn into sticky caramel (see note below on how to correct this if it happens). The syrup should be just slightly thickened and still pourable. (Alternatively, you can boil the juices in a small pan on the stove.)
  3. Add the syrup back to the apples, along with the flour and cornstarch; toss to combine.
  4. Take the other piece of dough out of the fridge and roll into an 11-inch circle, using the same process described above. If necessary, use a little dough to patch up any holes in the bottom crust. Add the apple filling to the baked pie shell, compacting the apples as tightly as possible. (Too many air pockets will cause the crust to dome, creating a gap between the apples and the crust.) Place the rolled dough over top. Crimp the edges with a fork or flute with your fingers, sealing the top and bottom crust together. Work quickly, dusting your fingers with flour as necessary, as the heat from the pie pan will soften the dough.
  5. Brush the top crust with the beaten egg (or cream or milk). Sprinkle the remaining 2 tablespoons sugar over the top crust. Cut a few slits in the top crust to allow the steam to escape.
  6. Bake for 15 minutes, then reduce the heat to 375°F, and bake for an additional 45 minutes, or until the top is golden and the filling is bubbly. Let the pie cool completely on a wire rack before cutting, about 4 hours.
  7. Note: Be sure to use baking apples that hold their shape when cooked, such as Honeycrisp, Jonagold, Fuji, Granny Smith, or Golden Delicious. And use a mix of different varietals for the best flavor.
  8. Note: If you accidentally over-reduce the syrup and it seizes up when you pour it over the apples, transfer the apple mixture to a large sauté pan and cook over high heat until the caramel melts. Let cool completely in the fridge before proceeding with the recipe.

Nutrition Information

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  • Calories: 589
  • Fat: 24g
  • Saturated fat: 14g
  • Carbohydrates: 91g
  • Sugar: 48g
  • Fiber: 6g
  • Protein: 5g
  • Sodium: 383mg
  • Cholesterol: 53mg

Reviews & Comments

  • 5 stars

    I made this and it was great.I made it again but added 1/4 cup of pink pickled ginger like that used in sushi bars. and it was better to me. I’d like to hear your opinion, should you try it.
    You’re are a peach.

    - Barry La Tour on September 21, 2017 Reply
  • 4 stars

    I love this apple pie recipe! I made it on the Fourth of July for a barbecue party and it was a great! Instead of making one big pie, I used this recipe to make mini pies in a cupcake tray. It turned out way better than I expected- so cute and delicious~!

    When making the crust, I did find the dough a bit crumbly, so I just added 1/2 tbsp more water to accommodate. Also, the apple filling was slightly too sweet for me, so I reduced the sugar by a bit and added a pinch of nutmeg.

    - Elisa Blissie on July 7, 2017 Reply
  • 5 stars

    Hi Jen, thank you so much for your detailed recipes. Your site is the first place i go! For this pie, can i also make with peaches? Would everything else be the same? Thank you.

    - wendy on May 17, 2017 Reply
    • Hi Wendy, every fruit reacts differently when baked and pies can be quite finicky. Unless you’re a really experienced pie baker and can make changes “on the fly” I’d suggest sticking with the apples here. Sorry!

      - Jenn on May 19, 2017 Reply
  • Hi, can’t find the Apple Crumble Pie I made, which was delicious. Can you send it to me?
    Thank you very much. BTW, I am the person who used a graham cracker crust and it was fabulous.
    Libby

    - libby zinman on February 9, 2017 Reply
    • Hi Libby, Are you sure the Apple Crumble Pie is my recipe? I don’t think I have anything like that on the site.

      - Jenn on February 9, 2017 Reply
  • 5 stars

    I made this pie and served it to my family. Everyone went crazy for it!! My dad said it was the best apple pie he had ever had. Thanks for making a delicious, simple apple pie recipe! I’ll definitely be making this again

    - Amanda Hernandez on January 19, 2017 Reply
  • Can the apple filling be prepared ahead of time and refrigerated for a day or two?

    - Denise on January 18, 2017 Reply
    • Sure Denise, that would be fine. Hope you enjoy the pie!

      - Jenn on January 20, 2017 Reply
  • 5 stars

    Hi Jenn!
    I made this glorious pie for Christmas Eve this year. First of all, let me just say that I had the best time of my life baking this even though it did take me a total of 5 hours from start to finish! (I made such a mess in my kitchen!) I took pictures of the pie as I was so proud of it! I loved every bite! My husband is diabetic and I am on a diet so we were limited to how much we could eat, but we just had to taste it. The crust was absolutely the best I have ever made in my life. I will always use this recipe for all of my crusts from now on. My sweet mother-in-law felt that it needed more sugar, but I totally disagreed. It was just right. Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge with all of us out here who don’t have the opportunities to get the education. I am 62 and about to retire in about 3 1/2 years. Heaven help us both! I love to be in the kitchen! Again, thank you for a wonderful recipe! Five stars all the way!!!

    - Susan on December 29, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    This really is the perfect apple pie. It was more work than I would normally do but it was worth it. I have made many apple pies in the past. All really good, but this is the best.

    - Louise on December 10, 2016 Reply
  • 4 stars

    I made this and it was beautiful and very impressive and delicious. I had trouble with the crust as it was very crumbly and hard to roll out. I had used the food processor and poured the water through the hole at the top, and found that after i dumped out the dough, the corners/crevices of the bowl were very wet and I think a lot of the water got caught there without making it into the dough, leading to the dryness of the dough. If I did this again, I would probably take off the top of the machine to pour the water directly on the dry ingredients, or maybe even mix the dough by hand. I also read other reviewers comments about the pocket of air, so instead of straining and microwaving the liquid, i cooked the apples and liquid down for 10 minutes on the stove top…I also felt like that led to fewer dirty dishes which was a plus. Overall, delicious pie and very pretty. Would make it again.

    - Raquel on December 1, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    Dear Jenn,

    I have never baked an apple pie before and I decided to try your recipe first because everything always comes so perfect so. . . It was a beautiful pie with amazing crust and I just had to really follow every step carefully. I messed up the first crust because I did not use cold butter but a bit towards room temperature and it really needs to be cold, once I started the second batch following the instructions it came out exactly like your pictures.

    I did get confused a bit with the ratio of apples because once you cut the core off you end up with less than 3.5 lb but I made my apple pie in a deep dish from William Sonoma so all the extra apples fit well there! Just fixed the cinnamon ration and sugar but it was pefect perfect perfect.

    One thing I added was some bourbon to the syrup reduction but that was it. I used fuji apples because that is all I get here and the filling was amazing.

    I will make another one for Christmas!!!

    Thank you for a great recipe, no need to keep looking.

    Sara

    - Sara MacMillan on December 1, 2016 Reply
    • Love the idea to add bourbon, Sara…I’ll try that next time. So glad it turned out well!

      - Jenn on December 1, 2016 Reply
  • 3 stars

    The filling was wonderful–the apples cooked perfectly. I used a mixture of granny smith and fuji apples. I had a lot of trouble with the crust and I am not a novice with pie crust. It was very crumbly, even when it seemed to hold together. I have had consistent success with Rose Levy Berenbaum’s crust recipes, so in the future, I’d use her basic flaky pie crust.

    - Kim Nurick on December 1, 2016 Reply
  • 4 stars

    When I made this, I made the rookie mistake of not reading the recipe carefully enough. This resulted in me using 3.5 lbs chopped apples, not 3.5 lbs of apples, chopped. I didn’t realize this until I added the top crust, so I couldn’t fix it. With the higher apple to sugar/flour/etc ratio, it was still very good although more cinnamon would have been better. I used the extra apples to make a second apple crumble because I had so many extra after already tossing them with the other ingredients. The 4/5 starts comes from that I think the pie should bake for 5-10 more minutes because the apples (I used honeycrisp) were just a little too crunchy for my family’s preference. However, I cut them in about 1/2-3/4 in cubes so that may have affected how they softened in the oven.

    - Jeremy Scheck on November 26, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    Excellent recipe! I made this for Thanksgiving for GF and DF people. I used King Arthur Measure for Measure GF flour,
    Earth Balance dairy free butter, and Palm Shortening for the crust. Huge hit!!! My only problem came when I did not have a baking sheet under the pie and the juices boiled over making a big mess on the bottom of my oven. Lesson learned.

    - Nanci on November 25, 2016 Reply
    • I was wondering if using the earth balance dairy free butter would affect it. I use it for cooking all the time, but haven’t used it for baking. Looks like I’ll give this recipe a try! Thank you

      - Patty on June 8, 2017 Reply
  • Hi Jenn, I want to make this apple pie, but do I have to add vegetable shortening? Can I replace it with anything else?

    - Serena on November 22, 2016 Reply
    • Hi Serena, The shortening helps to make the crust a little more tender, but you can replace the shortening with additional butter if you like.

      - Jenn on November 22, 2016 Reply
  • Hi Jenn,
    I’m making this recipe for Thanksgiving (with my own all-butter pâte brisée), but I have two questions. Does using a prebaked crust complicate doing a ruffled border? It seems it would be harder to seal the crust. Also, if I wanted to add homemade salted caramel to the filling, would it have any adverse effects on the texture/consistency etc?

    - Jeremy Scheck on November 21, 2016 Reply
    • Hi Jeremy! It does complicate it a little but it’s still possible to make a pretty edge — it will just be a little more rustic, as you can see from the photo. When I seal the top crust to the bottom crust, I crimp it along the lip of the pie pan and it works fine — although with an all butter pate brisee, it won’t hold its shape as nicely as it would with a little shortening. As for the salted caramel, the only concern would be that it would sweeten the filling even more, so the pie could be a little on the sweet side. But the salt might balance that out. I would say just don’t add too much. Please let me know how it turns out!

      - Jenn on November 21, 2016 Reply
  • Hi Jen, I would like to make this pie for thanksgiving but was wondering if you can make the dough in advance and freeze it before use. If so, would you recommend moving it to the refrigerator a day before using to soften?

    Thanks, Stefani

    - Stefani on November 20, 2016 Reply
    • Hi Stefani, Yes and yes :).

      - Jenn on November 20, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    the best apple pie ever

    - louise on November 17, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    Hi Jen,
    I am making this apple pie for Thanksgiving and I was wondering if I can use a prepared crust instead of making it from scratch (saves some time!).
    Thanks,
    Cathy

    - Cathy on November 15, 2016 Reply
    • Sure Cathy, that would work. (And most prepared crusts have instructions for blind baking, so I’d follow those on the package.)

      - Jenn on November 16, 2016 Reply
  • Hi Jen,

    This really looks good. I’d like to try and make it for Thanksgiving. But I have a question. Can I make this a day before? If so, do I keep it in the fridge? And how would I warm it up for my guests? Reheat it in the oven? Please advise.

    Thanks.
    Lucy

    - Lucy on November 12, 2016 Reply
    • Hi Lucy, You can definitely make it a day ahead and store it at room temperature. I don’t recommend serving apple pie too warm, as it tends to get soupy when hot. But you could pop it in a 300°F oven for 15-20 minutes to warm it up just a bit.

      - Jenn on November 13, 2016 Reply
  • Hi Jenn,
    Would you be able to offer a streusel/crumb topping variation on this to make it into a Dutch apple pie?
    Thanks!

    - Lauren on November 11, 2016 Reply
    • Hi Lauren, The topping that goes on my apple pecan crisp would work well here. I’d love to hear how it turns out!

      - Jenn on November 14, 2016 Reply
      • 5 stars

        I made the Dutch apple pie for Thanksgiving, using the streusel topping from Sarabeth’s Bakery cookbook (it’s a small batch, so I tripled it), only because we had pecans on our sweet potatoes. The pie came out fantastic! Probably the best apple pie I’ve ever made, and I’ve made a bunch over the years. I loved your apple recommendations: used a mix of granny smith, golden delicious and jonagold. It probably helped that I bought them from a local orchard, as opposed to the grocery store. And I went a bit heavier on the cinnamon than what you call for because we are cinna-fanatics. Blind-baking the crust really made a huge difference as far as avoiding a soggy bottom. Love this recipe, would definitely make it again, and highly recommend it with a crumb topping.

        - Lauren on November 25, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    This recipe is perfect!! Follow the directions carefully and you won’t be disapointed! I let my apples sit for close to an 1 and 1/2 hours….while I was preparing the crust. The person it was made for said “This is the best homemade apple pie I’ve ever had.”

    - Nurse12 on November 10, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    This pie was beyond outstanding! Thank you for this terrific recipe. There were alot of steps and it took some time but the results, WOW, so worth it! We are big fans of cinnamon, so I increased the cinnamon to 1.5 teaspoons. I used “Granny Smith” cut as directed and “Macs” cut into chunks. This combo had a really great flavour.

    - Anne on November 10, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    The tips for prevailing the bottom crust and reducing the syrup really help make a great crust which isn’t soggy at all! Thank you my husband loved it ?

    - Nicole on October 27, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    This pie was fantastic! Everyone I served it to loved it and it held up very well the next day too! The pictures for the crust really helped. I didn’t have any issues with a gap between the crust and apples, but will watch for it next time I make it. Thanks for another great recipe Jen!

    - Kavi on October 26, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    This pie was absolutely delicious and the technique details/photos, combined with the weight measurements for the flour, made a huge difference in the quality of the crust. The only issue I had was with the crust doming – when I cut into the pie there was a large air pocket between the crust and the apples. Any suggestions on how to alleviate this problem? I weighed the apples, but compared to your photos, it seemed like maybe I had more than your pie (the pan is exactly the same size).

    - Katie on October 26, 2016 Reply
    • Hi Katie, So glad you enjoyed the pie! This is a common issue with apple pie because the crust sets before the apples soften and sink a bit. Compacting the apples tightly in the crust to eliminate air pockets helps a lot (I’ve updated the instructions to emphasize this) but the only way to alleviate the issue completely is to cook the apples before filling the pie. If you want to try it, instead of straining and reducing the syrup, you can cook the apple and sugar mixture on the stovetop for about 10 minutes, until the apples are softened and the syrup is reduced. Then you’ll need to let the mixture cool before using — if the apples are warm, the dough for the top crust will be impossible to work with. Hope that helps!

      - Jenn on October 26, 2016 Reply
      • Yes, it does! Thank you so much, Jenn!

        - Katie on October 27, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    Hi, I made this pie the other day and it was (still is!) delicious. Like the other reviewer, I had the same problem with the apples cooking down and leaving at least a 2″ gap between the pastry and the apples. Could you provide the extra instructions for pre-cooking the apples? Also, I used only about 2 lbs of apples and the pie was huge! Love all the recipes I’ve tried on your site. Thanks!

    - Jane on October 25, 2016 Reply
    • Hi Jane, I’m so happy you enjoyed the pie. The gap seems to be a common theme – see my response to Katie above for instructions. It’s a bit more work, but it will do the trick. If you go this route, I would definitely use the full amount of apples or the pie will be sunken in.

      - Jenn on October 26, 2016 Reply
  • 4 stars

    Hi Jenn,
    Love your website! I made your Perfect Apple Pie and all the components were perfect. Great crust and yummy apple filling that didn’t run. I made mine in an Emile Henry dish as well. But the top crust had a one to two-inch gap where the crust rose and the apples fell. That’s happened to me before with that dish. I think it’s more related to a deep-dish pie vs the actual Emile Henry dish. Any ideas what causes that and more importantly, how to avoid that issue altogether? Thanks again for a great website with reliably delicious meals!

    - Vanessa on October 24, 2016 Reply
    • Hi Vanessa, So glad you enjoyed the pie! That happens to me occasionally as well, although typically the crust sinks down the level of the apples after the pie cools. The only surefire way to avoid a gap between the apples and the crust is to cook the apples on the stovetop first until they soften. I thought it would be one step too many for this recipe (it’s already a project and a half!) but it definitely works. It’s also helpful to really pack the apples in compactly.

      - Jenn on October 24, 2016 Reply
      • Thanks very much. A must for Thanksgiving!

        - Vanessa on November 8, 2016 Reply
  • Can I omit the 3 tbsps. of sugar from the pastry recipe? If so, do I need to increase the flour to 3 cups? I want to use the pastry for Christmas Eve Revellion Tortiere.

    - Mary Brittian on October 24, 2016 Reply
    • Yes Mary, you can omit the sugar (but no need to increase the flour).

      - Jenn on October 24, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    Hi Jennifer,
    I’ve never made pie before but I think I will give this a try. I have always disliked soggy pie crust so this appeals to me. I also don’t like the filling that is dry and the apple slices kind of crunchy. I love the gooey, pectiny type filling. How did this recipe turn out?
    Thanks!

    - Lisa on October 22, 2016 Reply
    • Hi Lisa, The apples hold their shape and are slightly syrupy. If you’d like a softer, juicier filling, mix in some McIntosh apples. I hope you enjoy it as much as my family does!

      - Jenn on October 22, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    Hi Jenn, this recipe looks great but I was wondering if there was a way to eliminate/sub something for the cornstarch? By husband’s family had a processed corn allergy and they get allergic reactions to things with cornstarch. Thank you!

    - Pam K on October 21, 2016 Reply
    • Sure, Pam. You can easily replace the cornstarch with more flour. Hope you enjoy it and please let me know how it turns out!

      - Jenn on October 22, 2016 Reply
  • How do you crimp raw dough to a crust that is already cooked? The cooked crust is stiff and would break with the slightest manipulation ( I would think). Using milk instead of water in your crust will give it a nice golden color even without the egg wash (for the vegans).

    - joyce m on October 20, 2016 Reply
    • Hi Joyce, I try to just press the raw dough against the edge of the pie plate, which effectively seals the bottom and top crust together. And the bottom crust is actually pretty sturdy so I don’t have any issues with breakage.

      - Jenn on October 20, 2016 Reply
  • Good morning
    Can I substitute something for shortening or leave it out?
    Thanks
    Chantal

    - Chantal on October 20, 2016 Reply
    • Hi Chantal, You can replace the shortening with butter if you like. It just makes the crust a bit more tender.

      - Jenn on October 20, 2016 Reply
  • I will be making this pie. I love the idea of the syrup. This is not the first time I’ve used our recipes. They’ve all been delicious.

    - Virginia Murrell on October 20, 2016 Reply
  • 5 stars

    Jennifer, I compared your recipe/ instructions to my apple pie recipes which have plenty of my personal notes & changes. From reading my notes, I think you covered everything I’ve gleaned over the years to come up with a great….I mean…Perfect great Apple Pie. My mother made the best apple pies (which I took for granted as a kid). I’m still trying to duplicate the quantity of syrup that would slightly run onto my plate once a portion of pie is cut.
    Your pictures are detailed and clear.
    This is a wonderful blog.
    Thank you so much.
    You have a real winner here.

    - Allie on October 20, 2016 Reply
  • This looks great but very time consuming so would love to do it well ahead of time. How does it freeze? Loved the baking powder in the crust… genius! Thanks, ga

    - Gretchen Andeel on October 20, 2016 Reply
    • Hi Gretchen, I haven’t frozen this pie, but I think it would work. Enjoy!

      - Jenn on October 21, 2016 Reply
  • Looks scrummy. If you are in a hurry and don’t want to blind bake the base (and I rather like the bottom to be a bit soft and juicy – I know that makes me weird), scattering a couple of tablespoons of ground almonds over the base before you add the fruit helps to stop it going soggy. If you don’t want to add any almond flavour, semolina does the same job – both help to thicken the juice slightly so that it doesn’t sink into the pastry as much.

    - Jayne on October 20, 2016 Reply

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