Perfect Apple Pie

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With a crisp, flaky crust and thick, cider-flavored apple filling, this is my idea of the perfect apple pie.

apple pie

Even with years of professional and home cooking experience, I still approach homemade pie with a bit of trepidation. I’ve said it before: the person who coined the term “easy as pie” had obviously never made a homemade pie! But making a delicious apple pie is totally doable as long as you have a tried and true recipe like this one. The key is to avoid the typical apple pie pitfalls — a soggy crust and waterlogged filling — by blind baking the crust and boiling down the juices before filling the pie.

These steps add a bit of extra time but ensure a crisp and flaky crust and a cider-flavored filling that’s not the least bit watery. The perfect apple pie!

What you’ll need to make Apple pie

ingredients

How to make Apple pie

Begin by making the crust. It’s easiest to use a food processor but you can also make it by hand if need be. Combine the flour, sugar, salt and baking powder in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade. (The baking powder is added to prevent the crust from shrinking during baking — it helps the crust expand into the pan rather than slip down the sides.) Pulse a few times to combine.

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Add the pieces of butter and shortening.

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Pulse until you have coarse crumbs with lots of pea and chickpea-size clumps of butter and shortening within.

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Add the water and pulse until the mixture is evenly moistened and very crumbly.

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Dump the crumbly dough out onto a clean work surface and divide into two piles, with one pile about 15% bigger than the other.

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Make two balls of dough and pat each one into a 5-inch disc. Wrap the discs in plastic and refrigerate for at least 45 minutes.

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Take the larger disc of dough out of the refrigerator. Dust your work surface lightly with flour and place the dough on top; sprinkle a little flour more over the dough. Use your hands to quickly knead the dough into a soft and malleable disc (don’t overwork it; you want it just supple enough to roll).

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Roll the dough, adding more flour as necessary under and on top of the dough so it doesn’t stick, into a 13-inch circle.

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Carefully drape the dough over the rolling pin and transfer it to a 9-inch deep-dish pie pan (at least 1-1/2 inches deep). Gently fit the dough into the pan, easing it inwards rather than stretching it outwards. Trim the edges to 1/2-inch beyond the lip of the pie pan. Turn the edges under to create a rim on the crust. Press the rim against the lip of the pan, forming it into an even edge as you work your way around. Use any scraps to patch in any tears or thin areas. Place the crust in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes while you heat the oven to 375°F.

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Remove the pie crust from the refrigerator and cover with a piece of parchment paper. Fill the crust with dried beans or pie weights.

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Bake for 20 minutes, then remove the parchment paper and beans/pie weights and tent the edges with a few strips of aluminum foil. (The foil will protect the edges from getting too dark.) Bake for another 15 to 20 minutes, until the dough is dry and golden. Increase the oven temperature to 425°F.

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Meanwhile, combine the apples, lemon zest, lemon juice, granulated sugar, brown sugar, salt, and cinnamon.

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Toss until the sugar is dissolved and the apples are evenly coated. Let sit for at least 30 minutes.

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Drain the apples, collecting the syrupy juice in another bowl.

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Pour the juice into a 2-cup microwave-safe measuring cup.

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Heat on high power in the microwave until the juice is reduced by half, about 4 minutes. (Alternatively, you can boil the juices in a small pan on the stove.) The syrup should be just slightly thickened.

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Add the syrup back to the apples, along with the flour and cornstarch; toss to combine.

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Add the apple filling to the baked pie shell.

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Take the other piece of dough out of the fridge and roll into an 11-inch circle, using the same process described above. Place the dough over the apples and crimp the edges with a fork or flute with your fingers, sealing the top and bottom crust together. Work quickly as the heat from the pan will soften the dough. Brush the top crust with the egg wash and sprinkle some sugar over top. Cut a few slits in the top crust to allow the steam to escape.

ready-to-bake

Bake at 425°F for 15 minutes, then reduce the heat to 375°F, and bake for an additional 45 minutes, or until the top is brown and filling is bubbly. Let the pie cool completely on a wire rack before cutting, about 4 hours. Enjoy!

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Perfect Apple Pie

With a crisp, flaky crust and thick, cider-flavored apple filling, this is my idea of the perfect apple pie.

Servings: 8

Ingredients

For the Crust

  • 2-3/4 cups all-purpose flour, spooned into measuring cup and leveled with a knife
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon baking powder
  • 14 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, sliced into 1-inch pieces
  • ¼ cup cold vegetable shortening, in 4 pieces
  • 7 tablespoons ice cold water

For the Filling

  • 3½ pounds baking apples (see note), peeled, cored, sliced ¼-inch thick
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest and 1 tablespoon lemon juice, from 1 lemon
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • 6 tablespoons packed dark brown sugar
  • Heaping ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch

For Baking

  • A beaten egg, cream, or milk, for brushing over crust
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar, for topping the pie

Instructions

For the Crust

  1. Combine the flour, sugar, salt and baking powder in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade. Pulse a few times to combine. Add the pieces of butter and shortening and pulse until the mixture is crumbly with lots of pea and chickpea-size clumps of butter and shortening within.
  2. Add the water and pulse until the mixture is evenly moistened and very crumbly. Dump the dough crumbles onto a work surface and divide into two piles, with one pile about 15% bigger than the other (13 oz and 11.5 oz). Make two balls of dough and pat each one into a 5-inch disc. Wrap the discs in plastic and refrigerate for at least 45 minutes.
  3. Take the larger disc of dough out of the refrigerator. Dust your work surface lightly with flour and place the dough on top; sprinkle a little flour over the dough. Use your hands to quickly knead the dough into a soft and malleable disc (don’t overwork it; you want it just supple enough to roll).
  4. Roll the dough, adding more flour as necessary under and on top of the dough so it doesn't stick, into a 13-in circle. Carefully drape the dough over the rolling pin and transfer it to a 9-in deep-dish pie pan (it should be at least 1-1/2 in deep). Gently fit the dough into the pan, easing it inwards rather than stretching it outwards. Trim the edges to 1/2 inch beyond the lip of the pie pan. Turn the edges under to create a rim on the crust. Press the rim against the lip of the pan, forming it into an even edge. Use any scraps to patch in any tears or thin areas. Place the crust in the refrigerator for 30 minutes while you heat the oven.
  5. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Set an oven rack in the middle position.
  6. Remove the pie crust from the refrigerator and place on a baking sheet (this makes it easy to move in and out of the oven). Cover the crust with a piece of parchment paper and fill it with dried beans or pie weights. Bake for 20 minutes. Take the crust out of the oven; remove the parchment paper and beans/pie weights and tent the edges with a few strips of aluminum foil. (The foil will protect the edges from getting too dark.) Bake for another 15 to 20 minutes, until the dough is dry and golden. Don't worry if the bottom puffs up; just press it down gently with a flat spatula, such as a pancake turner, taking care not to puncture it.
  7. Increase the oven temperature to 425°F.

For the Filling & Baking

  1. Meanwhile, combine the apples, lemon zest, lemon juice, granulated sugar, brown sugar, salt, and cinnamon. Toss until the sugar is dissolved and the apples are evenly coated. Let sit for at least 30 minutes.
  2. Drain the apples, collecting the syrupy juice in another bowl. Pour the syrupy juice into a 2-cup microwave-safe liquid measuring cup. Take note of the quantity and then heat on high power in the microwave, checking frequently, until the syrup is reduced by half. This will take about 4 minutes but keep a close eye on it as all microwaves are different. You don't want to cook it for too long, or it will turn into sticky caramel (see note below on how to correct this if it happens). The syrup should be just slightly thickened and still pourable. (Alternatively, you can boil the juices in a small pan on the stove.)
  3. Add the syrup back to the apples, along with the flour and cornstarch; toss to combine.
  4. Take the other piece of dough out of the fridge and roll into an 11-inch circle, using the same process described above. If necessary, use a little dough to patch up any holes in the bottom crust. Add the apple filling to the baked pie shell, compacting the apples as tightly as possible. (Too many air pockets will cause the crust to dome, creating a gap between the apples and the crust.) Place the rolled dough over top. Crimp the edges with a fork or flute with your fingers, sealing the top and bottom crust together. Work quickly, dusting your fingers with flour as necessary, as the heat from the pie pan will soften the dough.
  5. Brush the top crust with the beaten egg (or cream or milk). Sprinkle the remaining 2 tablespoons sugar over the top crust. Cut a few slits in the top crust to allow the steam to escape.
  6. Bake for 15 minutes, then reduce the heat to 375°F, and bake for an additional 45 minutes, or until the top is golden and the filling is bubbly. Let the pie cool completely on a wire rack before cutting, about 4 hours.
  7. Note: Be sure to use baking apples that hold their shape when cooked, such as Honeycrisp, Jonagold, Fuji, Granny Smith, or Golden Delicious. And use a mix of different varietals for the best flavor.
  8. Note: If you accidentally over-reduce the syrup and it seizes up when you pour it over the apples, transfer the apple mixture to a large sauté pan and cook over high heat until the caramel melts. Let cool completely in the fridge before proceeding with the recipe.
  9. Freezer-Friendly Instructions: The pie can be frozen for up to 3 months before or after baking it. (If freezing it unbaked, hold off on brushing the top crust with the beaten egg and sprinkling it with sugar; you can do that right before baking.) If baked, let it cool completely and place it in the freezer uncovered. When fully frozen, wrap the pie securely in foil and freeze. If the pie is unbaked, wrap it securely in foil and freeze. When ready to serve, proceed with baking instructions above (pie is likely to take a bit longer in the oven).

Nutrition Information

Powered by Edamam

  • Calories: 589
  • Fat: 24g
  • Saturated fat: 14g
  • Carbohydrates: 91g
  • Sugar: 48g
  • Fiber: 6g
  • Protein: 5g
  • Sodium: 383mg
  • Cholesterol: 53mg

This website is written and produced for informational purposes only. I am not a certified nutritionist and the nutritional data on this site has not been evaluated or approved by a nutritionist or the Food and Drug Administration. Nutritional information is offered as a courtesy and should not be construed as a guarantee. The data is calculated through an online nutritional calculator, Edamam.com. Although I do my best to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates only. Varying factors such as product types or brands purchased, natural fluctuations in fresh produce, and the way ingredients are processed change the effective nutritional information in any given recipe. Furthermore, different online calculators provide different results depending on their own nutrition fact sources and algorithms. To obtain the most accurate nutritional information in a given recipe, you should calculate the nutritional information with the actual ingredients used in your recipe, using your preferred nutrition calculator.

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Reviews & Comments

  • Hello , thank you so much for this great recipe im planning to make it soon but I have one question what did mean by tent the crust using foil in the next stage of baking the crust .Thank you

    • — Majida Alasmar on February 28, 2021
    • Reply
    • Hi Majida, Here’s an article with pictures that does a nice job of explaining it. Hope it helps and that you enjoy the pie!

      • — Jenn on March 1, 2021
      • Reply
  • Jenn! What a spectacular, foolproof pie! Over the years, I’ve sidestepped pies, instead whipping up crisps to avoid the hassle and fiddly nature of crusts. But this is fruity perfection wrapped in flaky, buttery pastry. And while the recipe includes a lot of steps, many of those steps are “refrigerate.” Doable! Not fiddly at all! So, thank you!

    Quick question: I know that you employ the spoon and sweep method when measuring flour. However, as measuring cups can be widely divergent, I’ve had more consistent results with my kitchen scale. How many ounces of flour per cup do you use? Different chefs, websites, publications vary on weight—4.25 ounces to 5 ounces.

    • — Norah on January 30, 2021
    • Reply
    • So glad you had success with the pie, Norah! I use 4.5 ounces/130 g for 1 cup of flour (and I always use King Arthur).

      • — Jenn on January 30, 2021
      • Reply
  • I have made this recipe twice. I love an apple pie that holds together when you slice it. This one did not disappoint. Great flavours.

    • — Karen Harrison on January 30, 2021
    • Reply
  • Perfect Apple Pie indeed!
    The only thing I changed was my bake time, living at 7,000 feet I have to bake a little longer.
    First time I have ever made my own pie crust, although intimidated at first, Jenn’s instructions are wonderful and reassuring.
    Also the brown sugar in the syrup I think took it over the top, adding a scrumptious depth that makes this recipe the only one you’ll need for apple pie.
    Wish everyone could smell my home right now!
    Thank you for sharing

    • — Amanda on January 28, 2021
    • Reply
  • This is truly the perfect apple pie – it’s rustic and home-y. The secret is truly in the reducing the syrup so you don’t end up with an overly watery filling. Great amount of pie dough as well – it’s not too difficult to work with if you are worried! Thank you!

    • — Rui Min Chin on January 28, 2021
    • Reply
  • Hi! If I use store bought crust (timing unfortunately) do I still need to blind bake?

    • — Corinne Davis on December 22, 2020
    • Reply
    • Yes, I would still blind bake it. Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on December 22, 2020
      • Reply
  • It’s a time consuming recipe but it’s totally worth it! First time I have ever made pastry dough or a pie and it was pretty simple and it turned out like I’ve been making pie’s for years! Thank you Jenn!

    • — Terrie on December 21, 2020
    • Reply
  • Can you use some white vinegar or cider vinegar to replace water, if so how much?

    • — Ed on December 18, 2020
    • Reply
    • Sure, Ed – I wouldn’t use more than 1 to 2 teaspoons.

      • — Jenn on December 18, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi Jenn,

    I just wanted to say that I swear by your recipe and make it every holiday. Thank you for sharing this. If I wanted to make hand apple pies, could I use your dough recipe for them? Would that work?

    Thanks!
    Lauren

    • — Lauren on December 17, 2020
    • Reply
    • So glad you like the pie, Lauren! Yes, the dough should work nicely for hand pies.

      • — Jenn on December 18, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi Jenn,

    Even though this recipe is a little involved, the pie turned out great! We love it! It was crispy and flaky as advertised. I guess the blind bake is well worth it. Thank you!

    One other question, if I used European styled butter, is it necessary to add the Vegetable shortening? Can I omit it and still have a nice flaky crust?

    Thanks again for this recipe. Enjoyed it.

    • — Lucy Conway on December 4, 2020
    • Reply
    • Glad you liked it! Shortening helps the crust hold its shape and makes it a little easier to work with but you can use all butter here.

      • — Jenn on December 8, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi Jenn,

    I just finished baking this apple pie and boy, it was tedious! It looks great but I haven’t tasted it yet because it just got out of the oven. I have a question. If I pre-cook my apples in butter and use a lattice pie crust, can I skip the blind-bake?

    Also, with the blind bake, does the pie crust have to cool down completely before I add the apples to it?

    Can’t wait to try my awesome looking apple pie. Will let you know the verdict.

    • — Lucy Conway on December 3, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Lucy, I always blind bake my pie crusts so they aren’t soggy, but it isn’t necessary if you want to skip it; the crust just won’t be as crisp. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on December 4, 2020
      • Reply
      • I wondered about if the crust has to cool before adding the apple mixture or can you put it in when you take the blind bake crust out of the oven?

        • — Lindy Chau on December 5, 2020
        • Reply
        • Hi Lindy, technically, the crust doesn’t need to cool before you add the apple mixture (but it is likely to cool down a bit while you’re working on the filling as the apples need to sit for at least 30 minutes). Hope that clarifies and that you enjoy!

          • — Jenn on December 7, 2020
          • Reply
  • Can I use a 10inch pie dish?

    • — Lindy Chau on December 3, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Lindy, Is it deep dish? If so, I think it will be too big.

      • — Jenn on December 4, 2020
      • Reply
  • My go to apple pie recipe from now on. The extra time and effort in blind baking the bottom crust, letting the apples soak in the sugar mixture and reducing the juices are all worth it in making this apple pie a five star recipe. I also loved subtle lemon flavor. We didn’t wait four hours to try it. It was perfect while still warm,

    • — Carolina Bercenio on December 2, 2020
    • Reply
  • Yes, this pie is fussy, and needs to be well timed (I made it on Thanksgiving day), but I trusted the process and it was totally worth it. My friend declared it the prettiest pie she had ever seen and it was delicious – the crust was very flaky, the pie was not too soupy, and not too sweet. I have tried several of your recipes and they never disappoint – I am glad I tried this even though it has so many steps. 😉 I will be making it again!

    • — Amie on November 28, 2020
    • Reply
  • Made this apple pie for Thanksgiving this year. It was delicious! The only thing I wish I had of done differently was layer the apple slices individually so they were packed in really tight. I dumped them in and tried to press down, but I still ended up with space between the crust and the apples. Everything cooked fine but next time I’ll take the extra time to really pack ’em in. Also probably could use another apple or two. Great recipe.

    • — Sarah O on November 28, 2020
    • Reply
  • I’m am having SUCH a hard time with this pie right now. Dealing with the dough has been awful. Even though i added the amount of water stated in the recipe, it was really crumbly and dry (could barely hold its shape in a ball/ disc). Rolling out the bottom crust was a nightmare, kept cracking, and then the butter started melting so it just got stuck everywhere. It’s blind baking right now, it didn’t shrink too much which pleasantly surprised me, and it smells very nice. There are a few gaps and transparent spots where I tried to patch it up (since it kept cracking it didn’t roll out into a circle). I’m not looking forward to the top crust, but I hope after all is done that it will taste good.
    Any idea why the dough was such a struggle for me? Anyone else have this issue?

    • — Marian on November 27, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Marian, I’m sorry you had such a hard time working with the dough! Sometimes if the dough is too dry, you need to add an extra tablespoon or two of water to get it to a point where you can work with it. There is a lot of variability in brands of flour. What brand did you use? I have great luck with King Arthur flour. Hope the pie ultimately turned out well!

      • — Jenn on November 28, 2020
      • Reply
  • A thanksgiving hit!

    • — Kayla on November 26, 2020
    • Reply
  • Hi Jen,

    Is there any way I can cut back in the sugar? If yes, how much?

    Thanks! Happy thanksgiving? We are so greatful and thankful for you and all your hard work.

    Blessings,

    Janelle

    • — Janelle on November 25, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Janelle, I think you could get away with cutting out 2 to 3 tablespoons, but I wouldn’t reduce it more than that. Hope that helps and happy Thanksgiving! 🙂

      • — Jenn on November 25, 2020
      • Reply
  • Is a 9.5 inch glass pyrex pan ok?

    • — Katie on November 25, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Katie, That should be fine. Just keep an eye on it during the second blind bake (after you remove the beans/pie weights); it may need a bit less time.

      • — Jenn on November 25, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi, I am planning to make this for thanksgiving and was wondering if it’s best to make it a day ahead or wait till the day of? How do I reheat it for serving?

    • — bridget on November 24, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Bridget, It’s fine to make it a day ahead. And I don’t recommend serving apple pie too warm, as it tends to get soupy when hot. But you could pop it in a 300°F oven for 15-20 minutes to warm it up just a bit. Enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 25, 2020
      • Reply
  • I was trying to be productive and didn’t read thru the recipe🙄. I mixed in the flour and cornstarch with the other ingredients and mixed in the apples. Will it still make juice and is this ok?

    • — Kim on November 24, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Kim, I think it should still work. Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 24, 2020
      • Reply
  • If I could give Jenn 20 stars I would, this is the best apple pie I have ever tasted and I am not even a pie lover. It took me 3.5 hours to complete the entire process from making the dough to finishing baking and this was my first time making this recipe. I made sure to print out the recipe and read it a couple times before actually baking so I don’t miss a process. I didn’t feel like the process was too difficult or “not worth the time”. The recipe was extremely clear and I completely enjoyed making this pie. I stretched out the bottom crust half inch over the edge of the pie dish, and just cut out the extra before baking the full pie. The crust tasted so good I had to use all of my will power to not eat the bottom crust lol. I didn’t have crisco or food processor so I replaced the same amount with unsalted butter and used my kitchen aid stand mixer, everything worked out just fine. Thank you so so much Jenn for sharing your recipes, I can now finally make my own apple pie for the holidays and basically anytime I want to.

    • — Catherine on November 23, 2020
    • Reply
    • So glad it came out well!

      • — Jenn on November 23, 2020
      • Reply
  • I made this pie last year and it was such a hit! Best apple pie I’ve ever had! I have a question about the pie crust. Can I sub in some whole wheat pastry flour for some of the AP flour without changing how it turns out? Thank you. Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family!

    • — Lorraine on November 23, 2020
    • Reply
    • Glad you liked it, Lorraine! Yes, I think you could use some whole wheat pastry flour successfully. Enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 24, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hello! I just baked this pie and I am planning on freezing the whole thing. How do you recommend reheating it? And do I need to keep it wrapped in the foil that it was in while freezing? I can’t wait to try it! It smells so good! Thank you!

    • — Julie on November 22, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Julie, I’d put in the oven (on a baking sheet) directly from the freezer and heat it at 300 degrees oven until the center is warm (I’m guesstimating it will take about 35 to 45 minutes.) Tent the pie with foil if the crust starts to get too brown. Just keep in mind that you don’t want to get it too hot right before serving as the filling will start to get soupy. Just a bit warm is what you’re aiming for. Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 23, 2020
      • Reply
  • I haven’t tried the pie yet, but I have just spent nearly four hours going through all the hoops to make it and getting increasingly exasperated at how complicated making a simple apple pie is in this recipe. Baking blind twice, chilling, freezing, boiling, all before it goes in the oven… Hopefully it will live up to the hype or I won’t be making it again. It won’t be out of the oven for an hour and needs four hours to cool??? We will enjoy some cold apple pie tomorrow because it will be midnight before this labor of love is ready for eating. I printed the recipe based on the reviews. I hope this is the best apple pie I’ve ever tasted but I don’t have the time to devote several hours to making a pie I don’t even get to eat while it’s freshly warm from the oven. This is likely to be a one off. Please consider how labor intensive this recipe is and at least let people know it will be several hours before they get to sample any of their pies if they follow the recipe as printed.

    • — Melanie on November 8, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Melanie- I hope you loved your pie! In the future you can determine how long a recipe will take by reading the recipe through and adding up each of the times listed for baking and cooling before you print it. Then you can determine in advance whether it is worth your time or not.

      Thanks for the recipe Jenn!

      • — Cole on January 19, 2021
      • Reply
  • I plan to make this apple pie for Thanksgiving. My intention was to freeze the assembled pie and bake it that morning. The pre-baked bottom crust threw me. If I pre bake the bottom crust, how does the top crust attach and seal with the baked bottom crust? And then freeze the pre-baked bottom crust along with the raw pie? My inclination was to NOT pre bake the bottom crust and freeze totally raw.. What do you recommend? Any tips for how to do this?

    • — Marcy on November 5, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Marcy, I would blind bake the bottom crust as the recipe indicates even if you plan to assemble the pie and freeze it. And regarding sealing the top and bottom crust, after you remove the bottom crust from the oven, you’ll just press the top crust against the bottom crust (the heat will help it seal) and then crimp the top crust only. Just work quickly as you don’t want the dough to get too warm. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on November 5, 2020
      • Reply
  • Just perfect – best apple pie ever! Linda

    • — Linda on October 22, 2020
    • Reply
  • I will preface this by saying that I am not a pie baker, but I am a bread baker. This is not a beginner apple pie and I think it takes some experience to pull this off. This pie wasn’t easy or quick or painless, BUT the end result was deemed the best apple pie that my family has ever tasted, with a beautiful, burnished-golden-brown flakey crust, and deep apple flavor.

    The pastry was incredibly finicky. The raw bottom crust completely tore apart when I used my bench scraper to lift it from my granite countertop into the pie plate, even though I worked quickly to roll it out and it was still cold. I patched it as best I could with dough scraps. After I par-baked it I could see that cracks had developed where it had been patched, so I brushed beaten egg white with a pastry brush all over the interior crust and baked it another 10 minutes, which seemed to work to seal the cracks.

    When it came to the top crust, I decided to roll it out on a sheet of floured parchment. After getting my 11″ circle I gently rolled the parchment with the crust into a tube shape to store in the fridge until I was ready to use it.

    I used a mix of Jonagold, Honeycrisp and Golden Delicious. I added the zest of one whole lemon instead of just a teaspoon, along with an extra 1/4 teaspoon of cinnamon. That syrup reduction method is just ridiculously good.

    I’ve seen recipes that use a reduction of boiled cider and this seems to be along the same lines. It really packed an intensity of apple flavor. My apples were mounded quite high and the top crust made it just to the edges – I didn’t have enough of a hangover to crimp it with my fingers so I just used the tines of a fork to press and seal it. I did end up with an air gap between the crust and the top of the filling after it had baked, so the one thing I would change next time is to sauté the apples before placing them into the par-baked shell. If the apples were already somewhat reduced and par-cooked before they went into the shell I think this would mitigate the air gap. I baked the pie for the amount of time in the instructions, but I then ended up reducing the heat to 350 and baked it for another 20 minutes since I could see though my glass pie plate that the bottom crust was not quite as brown as I wanted it. A lot of recipes indicate that the apples are cooked through when you see the juices start to bubble, but I’ve heard or read somewhere that for apples in a pie to be really properly cooked through and not still crispy, you need to see the juices bubble for a full 10 minutes, so that’s what I went with. This pie, for all the trouble I had with the crust, the extra step of reducing the syrup, and the undesired air-gap, was well worth it!

    • — Erin B on October 20, 2020
    • Reply
  • WOW. This pie is one of the best pies I’ve ever tasted, and I can’t believe I’m saying that because it’s the first time I’ve ever made pie in my life! That goes to show you what a good recipe this is. I followed it to a T, since I’m not really a baker and I realize how fragile baking recipes can be, I didn’t dare veer off in any way. The crust on top was the most difficult part of the recipe for me, I think since it stays refrigerated for longer than the bottom crust, it obviously comes out of the fridge a little harder and crumblier than the first one, and I think next time I will give it a moment to warm just a touch before I start kneading it. I started kneading straight away, which I think resulted in some tearing and crumbling throughout the rolling and draping process of the top crust, which gave me not the most picture perfect top. I was still proud of it though, especially it being my first pie. You’d never know I had any difficulty though when the pie came out of the oven, the top was golden and flaky and crisp and just perfect. The apples on the inside were perfectly cooked and had a wonderful amount of the syrupy gooey texture, not dry at all, but wasn’t so gooey that it had any effect on the bottom. The bottom lifted out of the pan just fine and stayed perfectly in tact and was a nice thickness. All in all this was a long recipe to make, but the directions were so easy to follow. I really enjoyed the process and it was so worth it in the end! A couple other notes, to be fair: I cooked down the juice/syrup from about 1c to 1/2 cup in a saucepan on the stove. It didn’t seem much thicker, but I went on anyway, mixed it with the apples and other dry ingredients as the recipe states, and then started pouring it into the pie crust and something just told me that the syrup wasn’t thick enough, as it was pooling at the bottom instead of coating the apples like a syrup should. I quickly put all the apples back in the mixing bowl and even poured the juice from the pie crust/plate back into the bowl as well, and then threw all of it (liquid and apples) into my dutch oven and heated it up for another few minutes, stirring it constantly with a wooden spoon until the liquid stopped pooling and thickened enough to coat the apples. This was a crucial thing that I’m glad I did (thanks to some of the reviews I read and Jenn’s answers to them). So, if it seems like the liquid is too liquidy, well it probably is, but it’s an easy fix! Also, while cooking, I did rotate the pie a couple of times and I also tented it when there was maybe 10 or 15 min left as at that time, the color was just about perfect. Oh, I also only used Granny Smith apples, because I hadn’t completely read through the notes and reviews before buying ingredients. I have no complaints AT ALL, but next time may try mixing up the different apple varieties because apparently somehow that will make this amazing pie even more amazing. Thank you so much for the recipe, I have a feeling I’ll be making it for years to come!

    • — Tiffany on October 20, 2020
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  • APPLE PIE WAS JUST OKAY & I FELT NOT WORTH THE EXTRA STEPS/TIME

    Followed recipe exactly – even weighing my apples on a scale, measuring exact number of ounces of juice to microwave in half, measuring exactly pie dough size, used the 9″ pie plate, etc. This is the FIRST TIME I’ve tried a recipe from you, Jenn, that I didn’t give a perfect score – sorry….

    Here’s why I am rating it a 3
    #1 – FLAVOR was OK but not great- (unlike other readers’ comments – my local farm stand apples cooked through just fine, my crust never burned….the pie LOOKED beautiful!!!!)
    #2 – PROPORTIONS are still off. I carefully placed the apples in the pie dish – as you advised, but it was hard to make it fit, I had way too much liquid even after reducing by 50%. (I had 1/2 cup of liquid, reduced to 1/4 cup, not quite sure that was syrupy enough?)
    #3 – EXTRA STEPS DIDN’T PAY OFF AT END: So many extra steps (fridge/freezer/bake/change temp of oven/reduce the syrup) -I’ve been baking pies probably 40 years (OMG did I just write that?? but it’s true) and very comfortable with pies, dough, etc – but honestly – this felt like following a really complex route to get somewhere, and the end result wasn’t worth it, nor was the journey.

    Sorry – but I will not make this one again….I hate to give a negative review, because I love your recipes so much!!!!

    • — Barrie on October 19, 2020
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  • I consider myself a decent baker and bake often. I have baked several apple pies in my lifetime and I must say this is the best apple pie I have made. Although, it is much more time consuming than most other pies, it is worth every single step and extra time spent. I followed the recipe exactly and changed nothing!! The family loved it 🙂

    • — Beatriz DiRissio on October 18, 2020
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  • Okay, the pie is in the oven. I used your recipe because I have made a lot of apple pies but the bottom is Always undercooked when the pie comes out of the oven. Blind baking seemed like the thing to do. The bottom crust shrunk (even with weights)to the point that the edge disappeared. It’s really important to make the bottom crust much bigger than usual. I should have paid closer attention to the directions there… When I put the top crust on, I had to push the edges toward the base and hope for the best. I have no idea how good the seal will be. How did you seal your crust? The pie plate will be hot coming right out of the oven after blind baking. Did you create a second edging with the top crust? So that the crust is basically doubled?

    • — Terry on October 17, 2020
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    • Hi Terry, Sorry you struggled a bit with the crust. When you put the bottom crust in, you should trim the edges to 1/2-inch beyond the lip of the pie pan then turn the edges under to create a rim on the crust. You then press the rim against the lip of the pan, forming it into an even edge. And I know it can be a bit challenging getting the top layer of dough to adhere to the bottom layer as the pan is hot. The most important thing to do there is work quickly so the dough doesn’t soften too much. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on October 18, 2020
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  • Same issue as a few others here. The pie browned way too quickly, I was tenting it towards the last 20 min. of the bake and it was already pretty dark. When I took it out, the apples were still crisp inside, so not baked through. I put tinfoil on it and put it in for another 15 min. at 350. Then it leaked.

    During the blind bake, once I took the beans off, the bottom ballooned and I had to poke it with a fork to make it go down. Just not a good time with this one.

    Not sure what the issue is for those of us, who all had this problem. Different ovens maybe? I have a bottom coil oven with a baking steel on the bottom rack to evenly distribute the temperature and that usually makes my bakes very successful. I also rotated the pie during the bake (3-4 times).

    I did place it on the center rack, as you mentioned in the other comments. Just a bit frustrating because it is a lot of work but hopefully it will still be edible! Waiting for it to cool now.

    • — Natalie S on October 15, 2020
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    • Update: The extra 15 min. at 350 cooked the apples properly. Still too much liquid on the inside, I suspect it needed to be reduced more before pouring back onto apples. No soggy bottom and overall too dark but edible! If you have suggestions, I am open to them!

      • — Natalie Shwartz on October 15, 2020
      • Reply
      • Hi Natalie, Sorry you had a bit of a problem with this! Next time, instead of microwaving the juice after you’ve collected it from the apple/cinnamon/sugar mixture, I’d saute the apples, the juice, and the flour and cornstarch for about 15 minutes or so. That will serve a dual purpose of softening the apples and reducing the juice. Hope that helps!

        • — Jenn on October 16, 2020
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  • Yes this was “the Perfect apple pie”, as quoted from my husband. I made a few changes- I didn’t have veg shortening so I used all butter for crust. I cut back a little on sugar and added a little more cinnamon. I also cut back on baking time by a few min. Overall took a long time to make, but well worth it. Thanks!

    • — Sara on October 14, 2020
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  • What size pie. Pan? 8” or 10”?

    • — Laura on October 12, 2020
    • Reply
    • Actually 9-inch. 🙂

      • — Jenn on October 12, 2020
      • Reply
  • I’m looking to make this tomorrow, but I don’t have veg shortening. Can I sub butter for it? I enjoy all the recipes I’ve made from your site.

    • — Sara on October 11, 2020
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    • Shortening helps the crust hold its shape and makes it a little easier to work with but you can use all butter here. Enjoy!

      • — Jenn on October 12, 2020
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  • Hi Jenn, I’m a newbie in the UK and have been enjoying your tips and advice. Made this Apple pie yesterday, just changed the filling a bit as I was short of time. It came out lovely and the pastry is great, I always have trouble with pastry usually. I made it in my KitchenAid with the paddle and it only needed 2 tablespoons of water. It was so good I’ve just made it again to make another pie tomorrow for the freezer. A big thank you as well for the metric measurements.

    • — Jan Rutledge on October 6, 2020
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  • This was so good! I’ve never made an apple pie before. The whole family loved it. Thanks for another winning recipe Jen!

    • — Natalia on September 20, 2020
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  • I used my own recipe for both the crust and the filling because I am very happy with the flavor of both. But I was looking for a way to prevent the soupy mess that I had experienced before. The technique in this recipe solved the problem and even improved the flavor which I didn’t think was possible! I used Fuji, Honeycrisp, and Granny Smith in equal measure, which I am convinced is the way to go. But Even though I used way more than this recipe called for, I still didn’t get the domed effect that I’m looking for. Next time I’ll use three of each variety for a total of nine apples, plus two more Granny Smith grated on a cheese grater.

    • — Ashley on September 18, 2020
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  • I used this recipe to make the filling and used a pre-made dough from whole foods. This is the best apple pie filling I’ve ever tasted! The syrup is seriously delicious and takes it to a whole new level! Thank you for the recipe!

    • — Annie on August 4, 2020
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    • Hi did you bake the store bought pie shell first before you put the Apple mixture in it?

      • — Judy Schultes on November 19, 2020
      • Reply
      • Hi Judy, I’ll let Annie weigh in if she sees this, but I would recommend blind baking the crust before you put the filling in it. Enjoy!

        • — Jenn on November 19, 2020
        • Reply
  • I bake frequently, but I never made an apple pie. This is very good and easy to follow instructions. My husband and I really enjoyed it.

    • — Evelyn on August 3, 2020
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  • This was the first pie I ever made in my whole life (I’ve never even made pies with store-bought pie shells before!) and I was super nervous… but it actually turned out well! I did make some mistakes but everything was cooked, not burnt or soggy!

    This also really opened my eyes to how much work pies are and my respect for pie-makers everywhere has increased 🙂

    • — Natasha on June 27, 2020
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  • I tried this recipe for the first time and it turned out just FAN-tastic!!! The crust was super buttery and flaky. I did have trouble getting the top uncooked dough to stick to the bottom blind baked crust, as the just baked bottom crust was radiating heat to the top dough and making it super soft and impossible to flute. A few tips for others trying this recipe:
    1) I did not use 3.5lbs of apples. I used all the apples I had on hand, which was 8 medium sized apples. I also reduced the flour and corn starch as a result (1 1/2 tbsp each, instead of the 2 tbsp each).
    2) I also learned from past Pie experience and did NOT pour in all the liquid with the apples. It would have resulted in a swimming pool and soggy bottom crust. Good decision on my part!
    3) Once I put on the top dough and into the oven, I had to tent the edges during the 2nd round of baking at 375F, so they did not get too dark. I tented with about 20 mins left. If I didn’t tent, it would have been way too dark.

    The pie turned out just fab! It was worth the 4 hours of effort! I wish I can attach a picture of the beauty!

    Question for Jen: How do you store the pie after it’s been baked and cooled? The pie crust will be soft if I put it in the fridge. But then again it’s an all butter crust, so it should be refrigerated right? I hate eating cold pie. I’m hoping it can be kept on the countertop for a few days?

    • — Corinna on June 20, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Corinna, Glad this was a success! You can store it at room temperature loosely covered with foil; it will last nicely for about 3 days. 🙂

      • — Jenn on June 21, 2020
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  • Hi Jen
    Love your recipes, always success. However, any idea why my pie crust, whether home made it store bought (Pillsbury)slides down the sides if the pie dish when I prebake it?
    Thanks so much.

    • — Mary on May 31, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Mary, have you tried the crust for this pie? It includes baking powder which helps cut down on the shrinkage. When you use a store-bought crust, using pie weights or beans when you blind bake it will help a bit but even doing that, you’ll still get some shrinkage. I find that the store-bought crusts that come in the aluminum tins seem to shrink a little bit less. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on June 2, 2020
      • Reply
  • Does this bottom crust really supposed to bake a total of 1 hr and 40 mins? I followed the recipe and crust was way overcooked and stuck to pan.

    • — Ann on May 25, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Ann, Yes, the timing is correct for the bottom crust (between the blind baking and then the additional time in the oven with the filling). Sorry you had a problem with it getting overcooked! Did you bake the pie on the center rack of the oven?

      • — Jenn on May 26, 2020
      • Reply
  • Jenn-
    THE Perfect Apple Pie! Baked so many different recipes this week in search of the ‘one’ recipe for an apple pie to serve at our family dinner ‘celebration’. Between my husband and I, we finished the first one w/in 2 days. Decided to make a second time, pie was delicious as the first one. Made one change to the recipe, to the pie crust; I don’t use shortening so substituted w/ butter. Otherwise, followed the balance of the recipe.
    Yes, the extra step to reduce the syrup for filling added to prep time, but oh so worth it! Passed on the microwave, instead used a pan and stove to thicken the syrup. Both pies had a flaky buttery crust, apple filling was tender (not mushy) layered w/ caramelized syrup (w/ tinge of lemon) was sublime! Recipe is a definite keeper. Excited to share w/ family.
    Pie was absolutely PERFECT!

    • — Marivic on May 6, 2020
    • Reply
  • Hi,
    I made this pie for the first time today for my spouse’s bday…the crust came out very good and golden/flaky but the insides were a huge disappointment. I did have to cover the crust edge with aluminum foil while it finished baking because it had reached a perfect color prior to bake time.
    The apples were oddly still too ‘crunchy’ and a whole lot of liquids were pooled inside the pie that we discovered once we cut a slice?
    I needed to reach out to see why this was? and figure out what to correct in my next attempt/attempts.
    When the apples were mixed with the lemon juice, rind and sugar, brown sugar and cinnamon and left sitting and liquids collected and reduced in the microwave for 4 min., my liquid was reduced but not thickened? Also it was a bit more than 1/2 still remaining in my pyrex dish. I loosely covered the pyrex dish with a paper towel and turned on for 4 min….the liquids did overflow and spill inside the microwave. I guess I do not know if my errors occurred here? which still does not explain the ‘crunchy’ apples?
    Would greatly appreciate your input for better results.

    • — JooJoo on April 30, 2020
    • Reply
    • Sorry you had a problem with this JooJoo! Next time, instead of microwaving the juice after you’ve collected it from the apple/cinnamon/sugar mixture, I’d saute the apples, the juice, and the flour and cornstarch for about 15 minutes or so. That will serve a dual purpose of softening the apples and reducing the juice. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on April 30, 2020
      • Reply
  • This pie turned out terrible. 4 hours of work and it tasted terrible. 1st off, 3 1/2 lbs of apples? It didn’t say if that meant with the cores, or after sliced and ready for pie. Next, 375 degrees? The outside was burnt to a crisp and the apples inside were raw And bitter. This recipe should be taken off the website. A waste of time and money!!! Never ever again!!! It needs to be perfected, tested and tried. Obviously, it wasn’t. Shameful!!!!

    • — Francis on April 23, 2020
    • Reply
    • Are you really that upset over a recipe? Hope life gets better for you 🙂

      • — Sandi on May 24, 2020
      • Reply
    • That happened to me too and I felt the same way. This is fine to tweak and try but why do that when there are better recipes.

      • — Susan on October 17, 2020
      • Reply
  • Made this pie for the second time over this past weekend to lift our mood as we enter week 2 at home. Takes a fair amount of time to make but it is definitely worth it — the best apple pie I’ve had. My husband thinks so too. Thanks for another great recipe and giving us a little boost!

    • — Katie on March 23, 2020
    • Reply
  • I really enjoyed making this yummy pie! The crust and filling turned out really well in my opinion. We used Granny Smith and Honey Crisp apples and it turned out great.

    • — Sean on January 20, 2020
    • Reply

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