My Favorite Pie Crust Recipe

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With this simple recipe, making a tender and flaky homemade pie crust is totally doable, even for beginners!

Fluted pie crust in a pie pan.

This is my go-to pie crust recipe. It has a buttery flavor and tender, flaky texture. The dough is relatively easy to work with and roll out, and it holds its shape in the oven. The secret lies in using a combination of butter and shortening; butter not only imparts a rich flavor but also contributes to the crust’s flakiness, while shortening ensures it maintains its shape and enhances the texture. Another key ingredient is a dash of baking powder, a genius tip from pastry chef Nick Malgieri, which helps the crust expand into the pan, preventing shrinking and slippage during baking. With just a few simple ingredients and these expert tips, even beginners can master a delicious pie crust at home.

“I’ve tried for many years to make a good pie crust. And here it is… the best ever. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe, and for explaining the baking process in such details. This will be my go-to for years to come!”

Tracy

What You’ll Need To Make Pie Crust

Pie crust ingredients including Crisco, baking powder, and butter.

How to make pie crust

To begin, combine the flour, salt and baking powder in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade.

Dry pie crust ingredients in a food processor.

Add the cold butter and shortening in pieces.

Butter in a food processor with dry ingredients.

Pulse until you have coarse crumbs with lots of pea and chickpea-sized clumps of butter and shortening within. Don’t overprocess the dough: all of those clumps of fat steam in the oven, creating layers in the pastry that make a flaky crust.

Food processor with coarse crumbs.

Add ice cold water and pulse a few times until the mixture is just evenly moistened and very crumbly. It will not come together into a mass — that’s good!

Pie crust ingredients crumbled in a food processor.

Dump the crumbly dough out onto a work surface. (I know this looks all wrong, but have faith!)

Pile of crumbly pie crust dough on a marbled surface.

Gather it into a ball.

Hand gathering pie crust dough into a ball.

Then pat the dough into a 5-inch disc. Wrap it in plastic and refrigerate for at least 45 minutes or up to 3 days to rest. Allowing the dough to rest helps the gluten relax and also ensures that dough stays chilled — both important in making a tender, flaky crust.

pie crust ready to refrigerate

Take the dough out of the refrigerator and dust your work surface lightly with flour. Place the dough on top and sprinkle a little flour over the dough.

pie crust dough on floured work surface

Use your hands to quickly knead the dough into a soft and malleable disc (don’t overwork it; you want it just supple enough to roll).

kneaded pie crust dough

Roll the dough, turning it frequently and adding more flour as necessary so it doesn’t stick, into a 13-inch circle.

pie crust dough rolled to 13-in circle

Fold the dough into quarters without creasing it and transfer it to a 9-inch deep-dish pie pan (the pan should be at least 1-1/2 inches deep).

folded dough in pie dish

Gently fit the dough into the pan, easing it inwards rather than stretching it outwards. Don’t worry if it tears, just patch it right back up.

pie crust dough laying in pie dish

Trim the edges to 1/2-inch beyond the lip of the pie pan, if necessary. Turn the edges under to create a rim on the crust (you can use the scraps to patch in any thin areas); then press the rim against the lip of the pan, forming it into an even edge as you go. Using your fingers, crimp the rim.

Crimped pie crust in a pie pan.

Place the crust in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes before proceeding with your recipe.

If your crust requires blind baking: Preheat the oven to 375°F. Remove the crust from the refrigerator and cover with a piece of parchment paper. Fill the crust at least halfway full with dried beans or pie weights.

pie crust filled with dried beans

Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the crust is pale and partially cooked. Remove the parchment and dried beans/pie weights and then proceed with your pie recipe.

blind baked pie crust

That’s all there is to it. Happy pie baking!

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Can I use all butter or all shortening in my pie crust?

A: Yes, you can use all butter or all shortening, but the texture and flavor will differ. All butter will give a richer flavor and potentially more flakiness due to its water content, but it can be harder to work with as it melts faster. All shortening, on the other hand, is easier to handle and helps the crust hold its shape better but will lack the delicious flavor that butter provides.

Q: Can I make pie crust ahead of time?

A: Absolutely! You can make pie crust ahead of time and refrigerate it for a few days or freeze it for longer storage. Wrap the dough tightly in plastic wrap before refrigerating or freezing. If frozen, thaw the dough in the refrigerator overnight before using. Making pie crust ahead can actually improve its texture and flavor as it allows the gluten in the flour to relax.

Q: Why should the butter and shortening be cold when making pie crust?

A: Keeping the butter and shortening cold is crucial for achieving a flaky pie crust. When cold, these fats don’t mix completely with the flour, creating small pockets in the dough. As the crust bakes, the fat pockets steam, resulting in the desired flakiness. Additionally, cold fats are less likely to be overworked into the dough, which can prevent the crust from becoming tough. Working with cold ingredients also makes the dough easier to handle and roll out.

Video Tutorial

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My Favorite Pie Crust Recipe

With this simple recipe, making a tender and flaky homemade pie crust is totally doable, even for beginners!

Servings: 1 9-inch deep dish pie crust
Prep Time: 30 Minutes
Total Time: 30 Minutes, plus at least 45 minutes to rest

Ingredients

  • 1½ cups all-purpose flour, spooned into measuring cup and leveled with a knife
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ⅛ teaspoon baking powder
  • 6 tablespoons very cold unsalted butter, sliced into ¼-inch pieces
  • 3 tablespoons very cold vegetable shortening, in 3 pieces
  • 4 tablespoons very cold water

Instructions

  1. Combine the flour, salt and baking powder in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade. Process for 5 seconds to blend.
  2. Add the butter and shortening. Pulse until you have coarse crumbs with lots of pea-sized clumps of butter and shortening within, 15 to 20 one-second pulses.
  3. Add the water and pulse until the mixture is just evenly moistened and very crumbly, 7 to 10 one-second pulses.
  4. Dump the crumbly dough out onto a work surface and gather it into a ball.
  5. Pat the dough into a 5-inch disc and wrap it in plastic wrap. Refrigerate for at least 45 minutes or up to 3 days to rest.
  6. Take the dough out of the refrigerator and dust your work surface lightly with flour. Place the dough on top and sprinkle a little flour over the dough. Use your hands to quickly knead the dough into a soft and malleable disc (don’t overwork it; you want it just supple enough to roll).
  7. Roll the dough, turning it frequently and adding more flour as necessary so it doesn’t stick, into a 13-inch circle.
  8. Fold the dough into quarters without creasing it and transfer it to a 9-inch deep-dish pie pan.
  9. Gently fit the dough into the pan, easing it inwards rather than stretching it outwards. Don’t worry if it tears, just patch it right back up.
  10. Trim the edges to ½-inch beyond the lip of the pie pan, if necessary. Turn the edges under to create a rim on the crust (you can use the scraps to patch in any thin areas); then press the rim against the lip of the pan, forming it into an even edge as you go. Using your fingers, crimp the rim. Place the crust in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes, and then proceed with your pie recipe.
  11. If your crust requires blind baking: Preheat the oven to 375°F. Remove the crust from the refrigerator and cover with a piece of parchment paper. Fill the crust at least halfway full with dried beans or pie weights. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the crust is pale and partially cooked. Remove the parchment and dried beans/pie weights and proceed with your pie recipe.
  12. Freezer-Friendly Instructions: The pie crust dough can be frozen for up to 3 months after you’ve formed it into a disc. Wrap it tightly in a layer of plastic wrap and a layer of foil. Before using, thaw the dough in the fridge overnight and then proceed with the recipe.

Nutrition Information

Powered by Edamam

  • Per serving (10 servings)
  • Calories: 163
  • Fat: 11 g
  • Saturated fat: 5 g
  • Carbohydrates: 14 g
  • Sugar: 0 g
  • Fiber: 1 g
  • Protein: 2 g
  • Sodium: 72 mg
  • Cholesterol: 18 mg

This website is written and produced for informational purposes only. I am not a certified nutritionist and the nutritional data on this site has not been evaluated or approved by a nutritionist or the Food and Drug Administration. Nutritional information is offered as a courtesy and should not be construed as a guarantee. The data is calculated through an online nutritional calculator, Edamam.com. Although I do my best to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates only. Varying factors such as product types or brands purchased, natural fluctuations in fresh produce, and the way ingredients are processed change the effective nutritional information in any given recipe. Furthermore, different online calculators provide different results depending on their own nutrition fact sources and algorithms. To obtain the most accurate nutritional information in a given recipe, you should calculate the nutritional information with the actual ingredients used in your recipe, using your preferred nutrition calculator.

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Comments

  • When you make your own pie crust……do you put some type of shortening or butter on the pie plate before you put the unbaked crust in the pie plate? I have looked at hundreds of recipes and it never covers that question. Usually it says roll it out and put it in the plate. I have a sneaky suspicion it sticks if not buttered or too oily if it is buttered. Help!

    • — D M Adams on November 13, 2022
    • Reply
    • Hi D M, No, it’s not necessary to butter the pie dish. The crust should not stick. Hope you enjoy if you make it!

      • — Jenn on November 14, 2022
      • Reply
    • I have never buttered or greased the pan for a butter pie crust. Happy baking!!

      I am making this particular recipe now. So far so good!! It was easy to put together. The crust is chilling now.

      • — Vern on November 23, 2022
      • Reply
  • Do you think substituting with a good gluten-free flour will produce an equally good crust?

    • — Barbara on November 13, 2022
    • Reply
    • Hi Barbara, I haven’t made this with gluten-free flour, so I can’t say for sure. (Oftentimes, readers will comment that they’ve adapted my baked goods to be gluten-free, but I don’t see any comments mentioning that here, so you’d be the “guinea pig.”) If you want to give it a try I know a lot of readers have had great luck with Cup4Cup and King Arthur’s all-purpose gluten-free flours. Please LMK how it turns out if you try it!

      • — Jenn on November 14, 2022
      • Reply
  • I am eager to try this for Thanksgiving but I need 2 pies. Is it better to make 2 recipes or can I double the original? Thank you!

    • — Diane on November 13, 2022
    • Reply
    • Hi Diane, It’s fine to double it. 🙂

      • — Jenn on November 14, 2022
      • Reply
  • Love this recipe! Can you substitute the shortening for butter? Would adding a tblsp of sugar work?

    • — Samantha on November 4, 2022
    • Reply
    • Yes and yes. 🙂

      • — Jenn on November 7, 2022
      • Reply
      • Thank you for your response! I made my first homemade pumpkin pie using your recipes and it was devoured by my husband and sons. ❤️

        • — Samantha on November 9, 2022
        • Reply
  • Hello I have just made this pie dough not once but twice and both attempts came out awful it would just break as I would pick it up it was super soft the first time so I cut down the shorting same thing I DO NOT RECOMMENDED

    • — Marik on October 9, 2022
    • Reply
    • I watched some tips on making pie dough. Is it possible you rolled the dough too thin? Or added too little (cracks) or too much water (sticky). Flours are not the same so hydration levels will be trial and error. Or perhaps it got warmed up by your hands from handling the dough too much? If so, you can fold it into 1/2 then into 1/4 and refrigerate again before working it.

      • — Kerrie on October 24, 2022
      • Reply
  • Hi Jenn – would you recommend poking the base of the pie crust with a fork a few times before blind baking? I’ve seen that done in other pie crust recipes but not in this one, was curious about the difference or whether it even makes a difference. Thanks!

    • — Lana on October 5, 2022
    • Reply
    • Hi Lana, the reason for poking a pie crust prior to blind baking is to keep it from puffing up too much while in the oven. You don’t need to do that here as you already have the pie weights/beans to hold the dough down. Hope that clarifies!

      • — Jenn on October 7, 2022
      • Reply
  • Hi, Jenn. I’ve enjoyed most of your recipes (I’ve also purchased one of your books on Amazon) but this one didn’t work at all for me.

    Taking the ingredients out of the food processor I knew something seemed wrong. VERY dry and VERY crumbly. It was difficult to shape it into a disc but I did, wrapped it in plastic wrap and put it in the refrigerator overnight. I removed it about 14 hours later, left it out for 10 minutes and then attempted to roll it out. DISASTER. The disc immediately broke apart into several pieces. It was impossible to get any sort of circle going. Into the trash it went.

    I immediately began a new attempt. I made sure I followed your recipe to a “T.” I placed it in the fridge and left it there for 1 hour. When I rolled it out, same problem as before. The disc broke into several pieces and there was no putting it back together.

    With so many 5 star comments, I can’t help but think I’m doing something wrong. I DID make one deviation from your recipe and perhaps IT is the culprit: Instead of using Crisco (I stay away from hydrogenated products), I substituted Spectrum All-Organic vegetable shortening.

    I used Gold’s AP flour; it might be 2 or 3 months old. Might that be the issue?

    Anyway, sorry to leave a 1 star rating but I did want you to see this and get your opinion on what might have gone wrong. (FYI, all of my pie crusts in the past have been 100% butter and they’ve turned out fine. I wanted to try your vegetable shortening version and see how it turned out.)

    Thank you for your kind assistance!

    • — Francis on September 4, 2022
    • Reply
    • Hi Francis, I’m sorry you’ve had a problem with this (twice!). I don’t think the flour or the shortening were the issues. After you remove it from the fridge you may want to knead it just a little longer than you have. If it still seems dry, I’d add a touch more water, little by little, until it gets to a workable texture. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on September 7, 2022
      • Reply
      • Thanks, Jenn. I’ll give that a try.

        • — Francis on September 8, 2022
        • Reply
    • Hi Francis! I too use Spectrum’s organic shortening and although I don’t think that’s the reason, I too find that 4 tablespoons of ice cold water just isn’t enough for me to form the dough. I just drizzle a little more ice water, probably up to a tablespoon extra until I can form the dough and it works out beautifully. Hope you give it another try!

      • — Julie on November 23, 2022
      • Reply
  • How long should I bake the pie crust if using it for a filling that does not need baking? Thank you : )

    • — Anna on August 22, 2022
    • Reply
    • Hi Anna, I’d bake the crust for an additional 5 to 10 minutes after removing the beans. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on August 30, 2022
      • Reply
  • How should I adjust the ingredients for baking at 6000 ft?

    • — Stella on June 26, 2022
    • Reply
    • Hi Stella, Thanks for your note. I don’t have experience baking at high altitudes so, unfortunately, I don’t have any wisdom to share – I’m sorry! You may find these tips helpful though.

      • — Jenn on June 27, 2022
      • Reply
  • I made this exactly as written. Honestly, I bake frequently and have had a general go to recipe, but just thought I can do a little better. This recipe elevated my pie to a new level! Thanks Chef! I have both of your cookbooks and I’ve never gone wrong with your recipes.

  • Most people don’t own food processors (especially beginners) so a whole lot of people are going to be stuck at step 1 with no alternative. Probably should state a food processor is required in ‘what you’ll need’. Thanks anyway.

    • Hi Meg, You can use a pastry cutter or two knives to cut the butter into the flour mixture. Hope that hopes!

    • I use 2 butter knives when I don’t feel like pulling out the food processor.

      This crust recipe is so good my husband asks for 2 crust pies.

      • — charrington on August 20, 2022
      • Reply
  • Hi Jenn,
    Thank you so much for taking the time to share and reply to comments.
    I want to make a chicken mushroom pie. Can I use your favourite pie crust recipe for the top and bottom of savoury pie?
    Cheers

    • Sure, Happy to help! And I think that should work – Please LMK how it turns out!

  • This is a great recipe and instructions. Mine turned out great! Thank you!

  • Hi I made this receipe, i thought the dough turned it great, but didn’t realize i didn’t include sugar (I was making pumpkin pie) and my husband said the crust was too hard and sadly the crust also didn’t have any flavor. I reviewed the recipe and read all comments that’s when i realized i missed the sugar. There was no mention in the original recipe to add sugar for a sweet type pie. How much sugar will i need to add, as i’m going to try this receipe again. I had found one years ago but can’t recall who from and that was s as perfect receipe for my apple pies. Not giving up in Chicago!

    • — Luz Perez Kwiatkowski
    • Reply
    • Hi Luz, I’m sorry for any confusion and that you found the crust lacking in flavor. The original recipe did mention including sugar for a sweet pie but I’ve since tweaked the recipe and removed it. This shouldn’t require sugar, however, if you’d prefer to add a tablespoon to sweeten it up a little, that would be fine.

  • vegetable shortening can be replaced with an equal amount of butter or margarine

    • — Savannah McGowan
    • Reply
  • I’ve tried for many years to make a good pie crust. And here it is… the best ever. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe, and for explaining the baking process in such details. This will be my go-to for years to come!

  • I just made two of these crusts for pumpkin pie and now I am finding out in the comments that I should have added a tablespoon of sugar to the recipe. Nowhere does it state this in the recipe itself nor in your pumpkin pie recipe. Do you think you could add this instruction somewhere where people will see it besides the comments?

    • Hi Jenn, I’m sorry for any confusion. It’s not necessary to add sugar to the dough for a sweet pie. (I’ve removed those comments to avoid confusion for others.)

  • Can you refrigerate the already blind baked pie crust in the fridge overnight before assembly? Or should you blind bake right before making the full pie?

    • Sure, Yvonne – that’s fine.

  • I followed this recipe exactly…I chilled the dough for 2 days, let it sit on counter for half hour before rolling and it kept breaking while rolling it out. I had to piece the pastry into the pie plate. What did I do wrong?

    • So sorry you had trouble! It sounds like it was just too cold. The longer you chill the dough, the more you need to knead it before rolling to make sure it is malleable.

    • Firstly, I love all of your recipes and some of the ones I’ve gotten from you are staples in my house.

      I probably did something wrong, but I made 3 crusts using this recipe and every one of them completely fell to pieces, unrepairable crumbs. :'(

      • Wow, I’m so sorry! I’m wondering if you used too much flour. Did you use the spoon and level method to measure the flour? Even a few extra ounces can make a big difference. This article/video explains it nicely.

        • Two issues can greatly affect your results: 1) flour can sometimes settle in shipping. Weighing the ingredients is always best if you have a scale and weights are provided. 2) Moisture content in flour can also vary. Even if you have the perfect amount of flour, you nat have to sightly adjust the amount of water added. For pie crust, though, too much water and overworking the dough can activate the gluten too much and make for a tough dough. But I have added almost 2 x the water at times and had excellent results. Make sure you accurately weigh/measure the fats and flour, then adjust to water to make sure the dough is hiding together. Be careful not to overwork the dough as you slowly mix in the water.

      • I got a nice digital scale and am having fun weighing most of my ingredients in grams. It improving my recipes!

  • Hi! First, I HAVE to say that every…single…recipe I have ever made of yours is AMAZING!!! You are always the first place I check when I’m searching for a recipe.

    Now my question is this, I saw a comment on the NY Times pie dough recipe and they said instead of adding ice water to the dough to add orange juice because it just does something special to the dough. Have you heard this or tried it before??? I’m going to use your pie dough recipe for pumpkin pie and since orange pairs well with pumpkin I was thinking it could work. But I don’t care that orange and pumpkin pair well. I just want to make a great pie dough!! Help!

    • Hi Katt, So glad you like the recipes! I have actually never heard of adding OJ to pie dough. I don’t think it would hurt, but I’d probably stick with the classic recipe for best results. 😊

  • My MIL taught me to add some cider vinegar to the dough.

  • Can I substitute shortening with lard?

    • Sure – enjoy!

  • Can I re-use the beans or should I just toss them after?

    • Hi Nicole, You can definitely re-use them.

  • I have a newfound crust confidence! Despite my nerves at facing the challenge of a homemade pie crust, I actually made the most wonderful, flaky, delicious crust with this recipe. The process was so clear and easy to follow. I will be using this recipe again and again! Thank you, Jenn!

  • I made this Spinach Quiche for supper, it was delicious. Thank you for sharing a wonderful recipe.

  • Thanks so much for this recipe. . .it’s the only pie crust I have been successful in making! Two questions: can the disc of dough be frozen and then thawed before rolling out, and is your salt measurement for kosher or regular salt? Thank you so much for another great recipe!

    • So glad you’ve had success with it! Yes, you can definitely freeze it and the salt in the recipe is regular salt (I will always specify in a recipe if it requires kosher salt). Hope that helps!

  • Possibly silly question here. Would you use the same recipe for the “top” of the pie? Novice pie maker here!

    • Not silly at all (and the answer is yes). 🙂

  • Hi Jenn,

    I love your recipes!! Can this pie crust be made and stored in the refrigerator for a few days before using? Also, for the pumpkin pie crust, how much sugar should be added?

    Thank you!

  • I can’t believe I was able to make this pie crust. But I did…then made the quiche. Amazing. Highly, highly recommend. Chef Jenn your awesome! Big Texas thank you for helping me create great tasting food for my family.

  • I used this recipe for thanksgiving pies and my mom is still raving about how good this crust was two months later. Which is fair—it’s truly delicious, not to mention easy to work with.

    One observation on doubling the recipe—it was very close to too much volume for my old standard size cuisinart food processor. When I need more than one crust, I find it’s easier to make one, just wipe out the bowl then make another. That gives a better uniformity of texture throughout.

  • This has become my favorite pie crust recipe, it never fails me! I use butter flavored Crisco shortening along with the butter (the first thing I do is measure it onto a small piece of foil and stick it in the freezer) and follow the directions with great success. I use this for Jen’s Parmesan & Leek quiche and follow the baking directions in that recipe (which has you fork the crust rather than adding dried beans). Another winning recipe!

  • This crust turns out perfect every time, I absolutely love it!

  • I just made this pie crust recipe to go with the quiche Lorraine recipe you have, Jenn. And WOW, fabulous. Best crust yet. I just bought a new food processor and was concerned because I usually used a pastry cutter. But this was so easy and much quicker. The only part I had trouble with was getting the dough to come together before rolling. Then realized you say to ‘knead’ the dough. I’ve never done that before but it made a huge difference. The crust was so flakey and tasted great. Also, I highly recommend the quiche Lorraine. My husband loved it! Thanks, Jenn

  • This has become my go-to pie crust recipe because it literally never fails. Unlike other crusts, it doesn’t get tough if you add a little too much water. It also makes enough crust for a deeper or bigger pie. I have not found it necessary to chill the shortening. I do use very cold butter.

  • Do you ever make an all-butter pie crust? can you convert this recipe to all-butter? when I first started making pies 40 years ago, I always used recipe from Julia Child cookbook which also combined butter and shortening. never failed and always good. but then at some point, I switched to all-butter — but I have never found a perfect recipe! maybe it’s time to revert to the butter/shortening combination! but, if you don’t mind, could you let me know if your recipe can be changed to all-butter with good results? thank you

    • Hi Vicki, You can definitely replace the shortening with butter, but the crust won’t hold its shape well. The purpose of the shortening is to make the dough easier to work with and also help it hold its shape in the oven. Hope that helps!

  • I haven’t tried this yet. Even though it looks good, you shouldn’t assume that everyone has a food processor-I don’t, and you don’t explain options. People have been making good pie crusts for many years before there were processors. Disappointed in the assumption.

    • Hi Lauren, While a food processor makes it easier/quicker, you can use a pastry cutter or two knives to cut the butter into the flour mixture. Hope that clarifies! 🙂

      • Can a blender be used in place of a food processor? Excited to try this for Thanksgiving but I don’t own a food processor!

        • Hi Megan, I wouldn’t suggest a blender, but you can use a pastry cutter or two knives to cut the butter into the flour mixture. Hope that hopes!

    • my mother in law made pie crusts with no measuring tools, a bowl, and two butter knives. works just as well. this is a great crust recipe and will be doubling it later for beef pot pie.

  • I made this crust yesterday and used it to make tarts. I followed the directions exactly (except for almost forgetting to add the water) and it rolled out easily. It will be my go to recipe from now on.

  • I don’t have a food processor. Is there another way for me to blend these ingredients?

    • Sure, You can use a pastry cutter or two knives to cut the butter into the flour mixture. Hope you enjoy!

    • I hadn’t read the other comments before I just left mine. I see another person stating they don’t have a processor. A lot of people don’t. I do a lot of baking and never even wanted one.

  • I just made this recipe as a trial run for the big day. It seems every year I try a new pie crust recipe, vodka, all butter, some butter, special flour, etc. and every year I stress about the pie crust. I just wanted to let you know, the recipe turned out beautifully and I’m excited to know I won’t be stressed when I’m making all my pies this year. Thanks so much for all your recipes, but especially this one!

  • Is this the crust you used with your pumpkin pie recipe?

  • I need advice… I followed ur recipe strictly, but somehow my dough turns soft
    I didn’t even need to put water in the 2nd attempt, it was still soft… it doesn’t become crumbly… the butter, shortening, water was all cold…

    • Sorry you’re having a problem with this! I’m wondering if you’re over-processing the flour/butter/shortening mix. It only needs 15 to 20 one-second pulses. Do you think that could be the case?

  • perfect pie crust. rolled out beautifully. light and flaky. used this recipe for a tomato pie tonight.

  • Can I freeze this pie crust?

  • Can i freeze this crust to use later?

    • Sure! (You can either wrap it securely in plastic wrap and foil or a freezer bag or could freeze it in your pie plate.) Hope that helps!

  • I have tried the King Arthur pie crust recipe, the Cooks Illustrated vodka pie crust recipe and many more. Yours is the most foolproof: holds its shape in the oven, crisp, tasty, easy to handle, easy to make. I doubled it today for a very large strawberry rhubarb pie. Lovely. Thank you!

  • A perfect, easy crust recipe! Thank you!

  • Hi Jenn. I’d like to make an old-fashioned double crust lemon pie for my Dad for Father’s Day. He doesn’t care for meringue. The very few recipes I’ve found online do not have many reviews so I am hesitant to pick one. I’d like to use your favorite pie crust recipe so that I know at least the crust will be a winner! Here’s my question… should I blind bake the crust for this type of pie? Does it depend on the recipe I choose for the filling? If you can recommend a good lemon pie filling recipe, I’d be grateful! Thank you!

    • Hi Christine, without seeing a recipe it’s hard to say for sure but yes, I think to be safe, I’d blind bake the crust as I suspect the filling will have a fair amount of moisture. Unfortunately, I don’t know offhand of a great lemon pie recipe though – Sorry I can’t be more helpful!

  • Hi Jenn,
    Love your recipes and have made at least 25 of them by now…..you have replaced Ina for my go to recipes!
    Made this crust recipe in my single 9 inch pie pan and just wondered how to adjust the measurements and baking time for the majority of my 10 inch pie pans.
    I also own small, 6 inch, pie plates from Longaberger Basket from years ago. I have no idea how long to bake the crust for in them let alone how to calculate the ingredients for a crust let alone a filling. Can you help? Would love to start using them as they’d be the perfect size for when its just my husband and me.
    Frequent The Capital Grille in Denver often so can’t wait to make the cocoanut cream pie.
    Thank-you for your time and hope you are in the works for another cookbook!
    Warm regards,
    Karen

    • Hi Karen, I’m flattered that I’m your go-to for recipes!! 🙂
      Are your 6 and 10-inch pie pans deep dish?

  • Hi Jenn, Oh my gosh I am so awful at making pie crust and my Mother made pie crust to die for. It must have skipped a generation. I tired to make this before Thanksgiving. It looked like the pictures, throughout the food processor process. I left it in the frig for 24 hours, sat it on the counter for 15 minutes and when I tried to roll it out it completely fell apart and part of it stuck to the roller. It was a mess. Did I not put in enough water? Also I used White Lilly flour because I saw it had less protein and might make a flakier? Was it not enough to hold it together? I should have taken a picture. Any thoughts are appreciated.

    • Hi Belinda, Sorry you had trouble! It may have something to do with the white lily flour. I’d try it again with all-purpose (I use King Arthur) and be sure to knead it just a bit when you take it out of the fridge to help make it supple enough to roll out. Also, don’t be shy about adding more flour as you roll it out to prevent sticking.

      • thank you Jen, I will try the King Arthur which I also have. I am determined to keep trying. My friends say I am nuts and just to buy frozen pie crust. :). I think I should have kneaded it more too.

      • White Lily uses a soft winter wheat with less protein, more like a cake flour; it will make more delicate, fluffier biscuits and cakes. All purpose flour has a mix of hard wheat and soft wheat, so King Arthur AP flour works better here. The little bit of kneading helps activate the gluten to hold it together – just don’t over-knead it or your dough can get tough.

  • Hi Jen,
    Thank you for this gorgeous looking pie crust recipe!
    I am making a beef pie (it will be a little saucy). Do you think I should blind bake the crust?
    Also, can I double or triple this crust recipe, or better to make 3 batches?
    Thanks!

    • Hi Bry, I would definitely blind bake the crust — and, yes, you can double or tripe without any issues. Enjoy!

      • I had the same issues of it sticking to the counter/rolling pin as another poster. It was difficult to roll out, but easy to patch. And by the time it was baked I don’t think you could tell anyway! I will try using more four on the counter next time, as you suggested to another reader.

        The taste was great! Very flaky and decadent, just like we enjoy. Soooo much better than the frozen crusts you get at the supermarket. Thanks!

        • use enough flour to roll! surface and rolling pin

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