Classic Deviled Eggs with Spring Herbs

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A classic deviled eggs recipe with a creamy, fluffy filling that you can dress up any way you like.

There are a million and one ways to jazz up deviled eggs – herbs, bacon, sriracha, crabmeat, toasted panko or, hey, all of the above. And as one who happily parks herself next to the deviled eggs at a party and calls it a meal, I can vouch for all of them. The thing is, once you have a good basic recipe, it’s not so much what you put on your deviled eggs that matters, it’s your technique in making them.

It’s important to hard-boil the eggs properly so the yolks don’t overcook. And then it’s essential to smash the yolks through a sieve before combining them with the other ingredients (or just blend the entire filling in a food processor) to create a creamy, fluffy, lump-free filling without the need for gobs of mayonnaise. This is my go-to deviled egg recipe; adding spring herbs is a simple way to dress them up and make them just a little more flavorful. Feel free to omit the herbs or add your own favorite toppings.

What you’ll need To Make Deviled Eggs
ingredients (1 of 1)

How To Make Deviled Eggs

To begin, place the eggs in a medium saucepan and fill the pan with enough water so that it covers the eggs by about an inch. Bring to a boil over high heat, then remove the pan from the heat, cover, and let stand for 10 minutes.

Deviled Eggs with Spring Herbs 2 (8 of 8)

Place the hard-boiled eggs in a bowl of cold water to cool (I usually just use the saucepan). Tap each egg on the counter to crack the shell, then peel under cold running water.

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Slice the eggs in half lengthwise, remove the yolks, and place them in a small bowl. Arrange the whites on a serving platter, gently wiping them clean if necessary. Using a spatula, push the egg yolks through a fine sieve.

mix 5 (1 of 1)

This breaks up the yolks, making them easier to incorporate with the other ingredients. You’ll be amazed at the difference this step makes — you’ll have no lumps and the creamiest, fluffiest filling. (You can also mix the yolks with the other filling ingredients — minus the herbs — in a food processor for a similar result.)

mix 4 (1 of 1)

Combine the yolks with the mayonnaise, vinegar, mustard, Worcestershire sauce, salt, black pepper, sugar, cayenne pepper, and herbs.

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Mix until smooth, then taste and adjust seasoning, if necessary.

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Fill a piping bag fitted with an open-star or large plain tip with the yolk mixture. Then pipe the yolk mixture evenly into the egg white halves. (For a less fussy preparation, simply spoon the yolk mixture into the egg white halves.)

mix 3 (1 of 1)

Sprinkle with paprika and more fresh herbs, then serve and enjoy!

deviled eggs 8 (1 of 1)

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Classic Deviled Eggs with Spring Herbs

A classic deviled eggs recipe with a creamy, fluffy filling that you can dress up any way you like.

Servings: 1 dozen filled egg halves
Prep Time: 20 Minutes
Cook Time: 20 Minutes
Total Time: 40 Minutes

Ingredients

  • 6 eggs
  • 3 tablespoons mayonnaise, best quality such as Hellman’s, Best Foods or Duke’s
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon whole grain mustard
  • 1/4 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon sugar
  • Pinch cayenne pepper
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped mixed spring herbs, such as chives, parsley, dill or tarragon, plus more for serving
  • Paprika, for serving

Instructions

  1. Place the eggs in a medium saucepan and fill the pan with enough water so that it covers the eggs by about an inch. Bring to a boil over high heat, then remove the pan from the heat, cover, and let stand for 10 minutes. Place the hard-boiled eggs in a bowl of cold water to cool (I usually just use the saucepan).
  2. Once cool, tap each egg on the counter to crack the shell, then peel under cold running water. Slice the eggs in half lengthwise, remove the yolks, and place them in a small bowl. Arrange the whites on a serving platter, gently wiping them clean if necessary. Using a spatula, push the egg yolks through a mesh sieve, then mash with the mayonnaise, vinegar, mustard, Worcestershire sauce, salt, black pepper, sugar, cayenne pepper, and herbs. (Passing the yolks through a sieve makes them much easier to mash without getting lumps but if you don’t want to bother, you can mix the yolks with the other filling ingredients - minus the herbs - in a food processor.) Taste and adjust seasoning, if necessary.
  3. Fill a piping bag fitted with an open-star or large plain tip with the yolk mixture. (Alternatively, fill a sealable plastic bag with the yolk mixture, and use your hand to gently push the mixture to one corner of the bag. Use scissors to snip off the tip of the corner, opening up a 1/4–in [6-mm] hole.) Pipe the yolk mixture evenly into the egg white halves. (For a less fussy preparation, simply spoon the yolk mixture into the egg whites.) Sprinkle with paprika and more fresh herbs.
  4. Make-Ahead: The whole eggs can be cooked and stored whole in the refrigerator several days ahead of time. The empty egg halves and filling mixture can be refrigerated separately, wrapped tightly in plastic wrap, for up to 2 days. Bring to room temperature and taste and adjust seasoning if necessary before filling. The eggs should be filled as close to serving time as possible.

Nutrition Information

Powered by Edamam

  • Per serving (12 servings)
  • Serving size: 1 filled egg half
  • Calories: 58
  • Fat: 5g
  • Saturated fat: 1g
  • Carbohydrates: 0g
  • Sugar: 0g
  • Fiber: 0g
  • Protein: 3g
  • Sodium: 62mg
  • Cholesterol: 81mg

This website is written and produced for informational purposes only. I am not a certified nutritionist and the nutritional data on this site has not been evaluated or approved by a nutritionist or the Food and Drug Administration. Nutritional information is offered as a courtesy and should not be construed as a guarantee. The data is calculated through an online nutritional calculator, Edamam.com. Although I do my best to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates only. Varying factors such as product types or brands purchased, natural fluctuations in fresh produce, and the way ingredients are processed change the effective nutritional information in any given recipe. Furthermore, different online calculators provide different results depending on their own nutrition fact sources and algorithms. To obtain the most accurate nutritional information in a given recipe, you should calculate the nutritional information with the actual ingredients used in your recipe, using your preferred nutrition calculator.

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Reviews & Comments

  • I consider myself to be a snobbish “Deviled Egg” connoisseur. These are by far the best I have ever made and/or have had. Thank you for sharing….

    • — Scott Fishburn on June 9, 2019
    • Reply
  • Love your recipe, thanks! I have found that eggs, even fresh eggs, cooked on low pressure in a pressure cooker for 4 minutes with a 5-minute pressure release time are easy to peel! I learned this method from Laura Pazzaglia’s book “Hip Pressure Cooking”.

    • — Karen H on April 20, 2019
    • Reply
  • Hi Jenn,

    First of all, big fan here! I don’t have whole grain mustard so am planning to sub Dijon. Would I need to make any adjustments in the mustard or vinegar measurements?

    Thanks,

    • — Kathy on January 26, 2019
    • Reply
    • Hi Kathy! No need to make any changes – Dijon should work fine. 🙂

      • — Jenn on January 26, 2019
      • Reply
  • STOP READING REVIEWS & MAKE THESE EGGS NOW!!!

    These deviled-eggs are SHOW-STOPPERS! EVERY SINGLE EGG WAS EATEN!!!!

    Guests stopped me to compliment the deviled egg, and many said that these were the best deviled eggs they ever ate!! THANKS JEN!!!!

    I’m an experienced home cook but only made deviled eggs 1x.

    The egg filling was really delicious, with a good amount of kick & made you want to go back for seconds & thirds.

    Hosted an annual New Year’s Day bash for 35, and quadrupled the recipe. Definitely appreciative of the great advice in the cookbook about cooking ahead but keeping the filling separate from the egg whites. I also chopped my decorative herbs a day ahead & put that in a snack ziplock bag – Worked like a charm!

    NEW TO DEVILED EGGS? Here is a tip:
    Followed recipe exactly. The only thing for me that I struggled with was consistently/easily getting the shell off the egg so I lost some egg …because 2-3 egg halves ripped in half. My eggs were probably too fresh – so user error, but the SUGGESTION FOR NEWBIES is BOIL MORE EGGS THAN YOU NEED!! 😀 then you’ll definitely have enough of the pretty white egg halves to serve, especially if you wanted to have say, at least X number of pieces.

    For those who LOVE bacon – check out Jen’s cookbook she has a variation with candied bacon. Believe it or not, a lot of my guests don’t eat bacon (what?? I know!) so this was a great variation that everyone could enjoy.

    • — Barrie Mirman on January 4, 2019
    • Reply
  • This is now my go-to deviled egg recipe. My dear, sweet other half insists that I make these whenever I plan to make deviled eggs for a gathering. I use a small food processor to blend and smooth the yolks and most other ingredients and stir in herbs as a last step. You simply must make these eggs!

    • — Sally on October 4, 2018
    • Reply
  • What is a good substitute for mayonnaise in this case? I have been wanting to learn making deviled eggs but if I can avoird purchasing mayonnaise that would be superb. (Also I would like to note that the best Deviled eggs I have had were made sans the mayo but I never learned what was subbed instead!)

    • — Kat on July 15, 2018
    • Reply
    • Hi Kat, One reader mentioned they used tzatziki in place of the mayo and were happy with the result. Hummus may work here too or you could try greek yogurt (but they will be more tart with greek yogurt). Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on July 17, 2018
      • Reply
  • Adding 1 tsp of prepared horseradish gives this dish a zesty flavor layer. For those who hate mayo, try substituting tzatziki.

    • — Nancy on February 3, 2018
    • Reply
  • What a great technique for making deviled eggs! The filling is delicious and smooth. I used Smoked Paprika on top and the results were outstanding.

    • — Jane Adler on December 3, 2017
    • Reply
  • I followed it exactly since I wanted easy peel! And it worked! The sieve made the filling so creamy. Thank you Jen! We serve this at Christmas.

    • — Irene S. on December 1, 2017
    • Reply
  • This recipe is fantastic as is – will definitely be making again!

    • — michele on November 29, 2017
    • Reply
  • My husband really liked these, and the egg boiling and peeling techniques worked perfectly, good recipe. Watch your pour on the apple cider though, you can taste it in the filling.

    • — Kaylie on November 22, 2017
    • Reply
  • I love this recipe. It was amazing. Will definitely make again and again.

    • — Angela on September 14, 2017
    • Reply
  • How far in advance can these be made? Could I make them a day ahead? How should they be stored?

    • Hi Eva, The whole eggs can be cooked and stored whole in the refrigerator several days ahead of time. The empty egg halves and filling mixture can be refrigerated separately, wrapped tightly in plastic wrap, for up to 2 days. Bring to room temperature and taste and adjust seasoning if necessary before filling. The eggs should be filled as close to serving time as possible.

  • I have only made deviled eggs with pickles, etc. and they were so so. These, with the addition of using the fine sieve were perfection. I added dill only. I did learn to use older eggs for easy peeling.

  • Hi Jennifer,
    Which herbs are in the photo? Inquiring minds want to know. Thanks!

    • Hi Susan, I used dill, tarragon, parsley and chives. ?

  • Another great recipe – similar to deviled egg recipes from the past but better! This will be my new “go to” recipe for deviled eggs. A hit at Easter dinner!

  • Tried these today since I had so much leftover boiled eggs from Easter. Everyone really liked them! Easy to make and delicious; another great recipe!

  • Hi Jenn, I made these for Easter yesterday and topped them with smoked ham. They were wonderful and gobbled up in a flash! Thank you for the tip on the sieve — it really did make the filling nice and smooth.

  • Hi Jennifer,

    My husband hates mayonnaise and vinegar! If I substitute strained lemon juice for the vinegar, do you have a suggestion for a mayonnaise substitute? Maybe humus? I know this will not be traditional deviled eggs but maybe it will be tasty anyway.

    • Hi Helane, hummus could work here or you could try greek yogurt (although they will be more tart with greek yogurt).

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