Deviled Eggs

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Devilishly delicious and endlessly customizable, deviled eggs are the perfect starter for any gathering. Learn my special technique for creating the best version that will have everyone asking for your recipe!

Plate of deviled eggs.

Deviled eggs are a beloved classic party food that have been around for centuries. The term “deviled” actually comes from the 18th century, when it was used to describe highly spiced or seasoned foods. In this recipe, I’ll guide you through my technique for creating the ultimate deviled eggs, from making perfectly-cooked hard-boiled eggs to whipping up a deliciously creamy and fluffy filling.

Feel free to get creative with toppings. You can add chopped herbs like chives or dill for a fresh flavor, crispy bacon for a salty crunch, or crabmeat for a touch of elegance. These stuffed eggs are a huge crowd-pleaser at any gathering, so whip up a batch and watch them disappear in a flash!

“What a great technique for making deviled eggs! The filling is delicious and smooth. I used smoked paprika on top and the results were outstanding.”

Jane Adler

What You’ll Need To Make Deviled Eggs

Deviled egg ingredients including Worcestershire sauce, mayonnaise, and apple cider vinegar.
  • Eggs: The main component; hard-boiled and halved, with yolks used for the filling.
  • Mayonnaise: Provides creaminess and binds the filling together. Always use a high-quality brand, like Hellmann’s or Duke’s.
  • Cider vinegar: Adds a tangy brightness to balance the richness of the yolks and mayonnaise.
  • Whole grain mustard: Contributes texture and a sharp, piquant flavor to the filling.
  • Worcestershire sauce: Adds depth with its savory, slightly tangy taste.
  • Salt, freshly ground black pepper, sugar, cayenne pepper: Seasonings that enhance flavor, add heat, and balance sweetness.
  • Finely chopped mixed herbs (such as chives, parsley, dill, or tarragon): Offer freshness, color, and aromatic flavors to the filling.
  • Paprika: Used as a garnish; adds color and a mild, sweet flavor.
  • Jump to the printable recipe for precise measurements

Step-by-Step Instructions

To begin, place the eggs in a medium saucepan and fill the pan with enough water so that it covers the eggs by about an inch. Bring to a boil over high heat, then remove the pan from the heat, cover, and let stand for 10 minutes.

Deviled Eggs with Spring Herbs 2 (8 of 8)

Place the hard-boiled eggs in a bowl of cold water to cool (I usually just use the saucepan). Once cool, tap each egg on the counter to crack the shell, then peel under cold running water.

Bowl of peeled, hard-boiled eggs.

Slice the eggs in half lengthwise, remove the yolks, and place them in a small bowl. Arrange the whites on a serving platter, gently wiping them clean if necessary. Using a spatula, push the egg yolks through a fine sieve.

Spatula pushing cooked egg yolks through a sieve.

This breaks up the yolks, making them easier to incorporate with the other ingredients. You’ll be amazed at the difference this step makes — you’ll have no lumps and the creamiest, fluffiest filling. (You can also mix the yolks with the other filling ingredients, minus the herbs, in a food processor for a similar result.)

Cooked egg yolks coming through the bottom of a sieve.

Combine the yolks with the mayonnaise, vinegar, mustard, Worcestershire sauce, salt, black pepper, sugar, cayenne pepper, and herbs.

Mayonnaise, egg yolk, and other ingredients in a bowl.

Mix until smooth, then taste and adjust seasoning, if necessary.

Spatula in a bowl of smooth deviled egg mixture.

Fill a piping bag fitted with an open star or large plain tip with the yolk mixture. Then pipe the yolk mixture evenly into the egg white halves. (For a less fussy preparation, simply spoon the yolk mixture into the egg white halves.)

filling the deviled eggs

Sprinkle with paprika and more fresh herbs, then serve and enjoy!

Plate of deviled eggs.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I make deviled eggs ahead of time?

The whole eggs can be cooked and stored whole in the refrigerator several days ahead of time. The empty egg halves and filling mixture can be refrigerated separately, wrapped tightly in plastic wrap, for up to 2 days. Bring to room temperature and taste and adjust seasoning if necessary before filling. The eggs should be filled as close to serving time as possible.

How can I prevent the egg whites from tearing when I peel them?

To prevent tearing, start with eggs that are not too fresh, as slightly older eggs peel more easily. After boiling, immediately plunge the eggs into ice water to cool rapidly; this helps the egg whites contract and separates them from the shell. Crack the shell gently all around and start peeling from the wider end, where there’s an air pocket. Holding the egg under cold running water or peeling them in a bowl of water can also help remove the shell more cleanly.

How can I prevent the greenish ring around the yolk when making deviled eggs?

The green ring around the yolk is a result of overcooking and is caused by a reaction between sulfur in the egg white and iron in the yolk. To prevent this, avoid overcooking your eggs by following the precise cooking time.

Video Tutorial

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Deviled Eggs

Devilishly delicious and endlessly customizable, deviled eggs are the perfect starter for any gathering. Learn my special technique for creating the best version that will have everyone asking for your recipe!

Servings: 1 dozen filled egg halves
Prep Time: 20 Minutes
Cook Time: 20 Minutes
Total Time: 40 Minutes

Ingredients

  • 6 large eggs
  • 3 tablespoons mayonnaise, best quality such as Hellman’s or Duke’s
  • 1½ teaspoons cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon whole grain mustard
  • ¼ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • ⅛ teaspoon salt
  • ⅛ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • ⅛ teaspoon sugar
  • Pinch cayenne pepper
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped mixed herbs, such as chives, parsley, dill or tarragon, plus more for serving
  • Paprika, for serving

Instructions

  1. Place the eggs in a medium saucepan and fill the pan with enough water so that it covers the eggs by about an inch. Bring to a boil over high heat, then remove the pan from the heat, cover, and let stand for 10 minutes. Place the hard-boiled eggs in a bowl of cold water to cool (I usually just use the saucepan).
  2. Once cool, tap each egg on the counter to crack the shell, then peel under cold running water. Slice the eggs in half lengthwise. Using a small spoon, gently remove the yolks and place them in a small bowl. Arrange the whites on a serving platter, gently wiping them clean if necessary. Using a spatula, push the egg yolks through a mesh sieve, then mash with the mayonnaise, vinegar, mustard, Worcestershire sauce, salt, black pepper, sugar, cayenne pepper, and herbs. (Passing the yolks through a sieve makes them much easier to mash without getting lumps but if you don’t want to bother, you can mix the yolks with the other filling ingredients - minus the herbs - in a food processor.) Taste and adjust seasoning, if necessary.
  3. Fill a piping bag fitted with an open star or large plain tip with the yolk mixture. (Alternatively, fill a sealable plastic bag with the yolk mixture, and use your hand to gently push the mixture to one corner of the bag. Use scissors to snip off the tip of the corner, opening up a ¼–in [6-mm] hole.) Pipe the yolk mixture evenly into the egg white halves. (For a less fussy preparation, simply spoon the yolk mixture into the egg whites.) Sprinkle with paprika and more fresh herbs.
  4. Make-Ahead: The whole eggs can be cooked and stored whole in the refrigerator several days ahead of time. The empty egg halves and filling mixture can be refrigerated separately, wrapped tightly in plastic wrap, for up to 2 days. Bring to room temperature and taste and adjust seasoning if necessary before filling. The eggs should be filled as close to serving time as possible.

Nutrition Information

Powered by Edamam

  • Per serving (12 servings)
  • Serving size: 1 filled egg half
  • Calories: 58
  • Fat: 5 g
  • Saturated fat: 1 g
  • Carbohydrates: 0 g
  • Sugar: 0 g
  • Fiber: 0 g
  • Protein: 3 g
  • Sodium: 62 mg
  • Cholesterol: 81 mg

This website is written and produced for informational purposes only. I am not a certified nutritionist and the nutritional data on this site has not been evaluated or approved by a nutritionist or the Food and Drug Administration. Nutritional information is offered as a courtesy and should not be construed as a guarantee. The data is calculated through an online nutritional calculator, Edamam.com. Although I do my best to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates only. Varying factors such as product types or brands purchased, natural fluctuations in fresh produce, and the way ingredients are processed change the effective nutritional information in any given recipe. Furthermore, different online calculators provide different results depending on their own nutrition fact sources and algorithms. To obtain the most accurate nutritional information in a given recipe, you should calculate the nutritional information with the actual ingredients used in your recipe, using your preferred nutrition calculator.

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Comments

  • As always, your recipes outshine all others on the web!
    Any chance you could add a ratio tab when one would like to double or increase the servings by 1.5 times as I know the ratios are not always 1:1 when doing so, especially with baking?
    Thanks for all the great things you put out for us to enjoy!
    Henry

    • — Henry S on March 31, 2024
    • Reply
    • Hi Henry, So glad you like the recipes! I will add your suggestion to my list of potential enhancements to the site. Also, a reader shared a website that will scale your recipes. It’s called AnyList if you want to check it out. I took a peek at it, and it appears that there are a lot of free options but if you want to scale recipes, that’s an option you need to pay for. (Keep in mind that I haven’t tried it myself.)

      • — Jenn on April 1, 2024
      • Reply
  • Very tasty, loved the worcesteshire sauce and the mustard .. lots of flavor

    • — Susan Groves on March 30, 2024
    • Reply
  • Yummy! Instead of paprika, I use Old Bay.

    • — Robin on March 29, 2024
    • Reply
  • LOVE your site … it is my first ‘go to’ for recipes. When you suggest using a good mayo, such as Hellmand, please see the attached label.

    On the West Coast, some brands have different labeling Although they are the same product, ingredients, etc

    This is off the label of Best Foods mayonnaise

    ***
    Best Foods

    REST ASSURED IT’S STILL THE SAME DELICIOUS MAYONNAISE!
    LEARNABOUTMYJAR.COM

    KNOWN AS HELLMANN’S EAST OF THE ROCKIES

    Quality of this product is guaranteed.
    Discover more at Learnaboutmymayo.com

    • — Alyce LaGasse on March 27, 2024
    • Reply
  • I usually boil two extra eggs to compensate for the ones I mutilate peeling. Not this time! All were pristine. I had a messy time trying to press through a strainer so I used a mini whisk. Also messy but effective. I followed your basic instructions and the result was a clean plate pre Super Bowl. Should have made more….

    • — Diane on February 12, 2024
    • Reply
  • Made these for Super Bowl Sunday. Loved the whole grain mustard touch. Great recipe. I did omit the herbs. Also subbed part of the mayonnaise out with horseradish sauce. Really yummy. Lots of good recipes on this site.

    • — Rebecca on February 12, 2024
    • Reply
  • I know there are so many good comments, but the batch of eggs I made taste really sweet. Like candy kind of sweet. Idk if it was the mayonnaise – maybe I added too much. They are ok but not the best
    I’ve had. I made these because I was hungry and I love deviled eggs, but this is definitely not on the recipe (it is probably on me). I still ate them anyway lol!

    • — Maddison on November 14, 2023
    • Reply
  • I took deviled eggs to a 4th of July BBQ where there were about 30 guests. I made 48 deviled eggs, 24 were “classic”, and because I have a large herb garden, the other 24 were these. I used chives, dill and parsley as my mix. I will never again waste my time with the classic recipe, Jenn’s recipe blew those out of the water. They are absolutely delicious!! I do some Mexican ones sometimes too, but some people don’t do spicy…these will be my “house” deviled eggs from now on. Thanks for another trust-worthy recipe!!

    • — Margerelli on July 6, 2023
    • Reply
  • Brought these to a potluck and went home with an empty platter!

    • — Susan L on June 3, 2023
    • Reply
  • Jenn, thank you for posting ALL your top-notch recipes. This one is a keeper, too. We made one change in the recipe substituting pickle juice for the vinegar. It’s a great substitution for anyone not liking the cider vinegar.

    • — Dianne on May 17, 2023
    • Reply
  • Brief comment on peeling hard boiled eggs. One option is before cooking them, put a small pinhole on the end of the egg with the air pocket. My preferred method is when cooling them in ice water, jostle them in the bowl so the shells partly crack. Both methods allow water to seep in under the shell which makes them much easier to peel.

    • — Don Schneider on April 11, 2023
    • Reply
  • Made this recipe, changed some of the ingredients but the eggs were delicious.

    • — Therese on April 11, 2023
    • Reply
  • We made these today for Easter dinner and they were delicious. All eggs were gone in a few minutes. I have never been a big fan of deviled eggs because of the usually present heavy mustard taste. These were not like that at all. We used the food processor which made it pretty easy and they were so good! I highly recommend this recipe! Thank you Jenn!

    • — Cheryl Skornik on April 9, 2023
    • Reply
  • Wonderful recipe, thanks! I have a question: when testing raw eggs do you use cold eggs in cold water? TIA!

    • — Rick Campbell on April 5, 2023
    • Reply
    • Hi Rick, are you asking about testing them for freshness? If so, I honestly never do that as I go through them so quickly but I have heard that testing them with water like this.

      • — Jenn on April 5, 2023
      • Reply
      • Hi Jenn, I have cooked my eggs exactly as you do for many years.
        I also cool them with ice water in the pan. They always turn out perfectly done. I can’t wait to try your recipe for deviled eggs, something I’ve never quite mastered. Mine always seem bland to me. Your website is always my go-to place to get recipes. My daughter is planning to bring a brussel sprouts salad to Easter dinner. I sent her your recipes and told her I guarantee any of them will be good, coming from Once Upon a Chef!

        • — Terri on April 6, 2023
        • Reply
        • 💗

          • — Jenn on April 6, 2023
          • Reply
  • Just made these for game day tomorrow( 49ers vs Eagirls) the filling is delicious.Love the whole grain mustard. One of my wife`s favorite mustard’s why didn’t I think of that?!
    Also in the fridge is your Maryland Crab Cake recipe,it`s dungeness crab season here northern Ca. so that`s what we use,problem is gotta wait till tomorrow!
    Predicted 5 star rating in advance.

    • — lowandslow on January 28, 2023
    • Reply
  • Thank you for this recipe! It was so easy and delicious! Next time I will use a french star tip or an open star. I didn’t think and just grabbed a closed star tip and some of the herbs “clogged” parts of the tip so it wasn’t as pretty as I had planned. But they all got devoured nonetheless.

  • Best recipe! Added bacon pieces to top! Perfect recipe. Thank you

  • I made these for a neighbors birthday party. They were gone in minutes! Delicious! Thanks, Jenn!

  • These are delicious! I added a little Dijon mustard and a little more salt. The mini food processor worked great — makes the filling really smooth and easy to pipe! To bring them to a friend’s party, I kept everything separate until I got to her house. I brought the filling already in a piping bag with a large star tip, and kept the whites in a plastic container. I brought my own platter, some watercress as a base for the platter, the chopped herbs, and paprika. It was really fast and easy to pipe in the filling and put everything together. That way the eggs were fresh and pretty, and I didn’t have to worry about them getting smushed en route.

  • These are delicious and the fluffy texture is nice !

  • Made these for Easter brunch (along with Jenn’s Maple Candied Bacon-highly recommend). They came out really well. I did not use a sieve, rather added everything to a food processor and mixed. By accident, I added the herbs to the food processor but taste-wise it came out great. One problem I encountered was that my food processor is big and it wasn’t mixing well enough. A smaller food processor would have worked. I added a little water and that seemed to do the trick. Many were commenting on the herbs and how tasty they were.

  • I sure did something wrong. I learned a few things….first, older eggs are not what you use, very hard to peel. I did the boil wait 10 minute gig, and egs were soft boiled and whites marginally cooked. Did that twice, no go, reboiled another 5 min then much more manageable. So I have not really cooked the eggs properly. They were all scarfed in about 5 minutes though.
    Any thoughts on why no cook? Maybe let warm to room temp first? The herb mix in was awesome, and your picture has dill in it, try that next time.

    • Hi Doug, Sorry to hear it took a few attempts to get these cooked to the right level of doneness! I don’t think you need to let them come to room temperature; there’s always some variation in stoves, so if you found that you needed that additional 5 minutes to get them right, I’d just stick with that.

  • Hi, Jenn. I live at 6500 ft elevation. How long would you let the eggs sit in the hot water at this elevation? I don’t know that 10 minutes will cut it. Thanks!

    • Hi Kathleen, Thanks for your note. I don’t have experience cooking at high altitudes so, unfortunately, I don’t have any wisdom to share – I’m sorry! You may find these tips helpful though.

  • Hi, I have a question – I want to make Old Bay deviled eggs – should I just replace maybe the cayenne and black pepper? Or are there other elements of the yolk mixture that would be overwhelming alongside Old Bay or wouldn’t taste right with it?

    (I know your recipe will be good – you are a hero in this house because everything we have made from your blog has been amazing.)

    • Hi Anne, thanks for your nice words–so glad you like the recipes! I think these would be fine with Old Bay and would replace the cayenne and black pepper as well as the salt (as Old Bay contains salt). You can adjust the seasoning and add more salt if necessary before you fill the egg whites. Hope that helps!

  • I followed your tip and used a sieve for the yolks and it was worth the effort. Halfway through the process I switched from the spatula to a pestle and it was easier and quicker. Thanks for another perfected recipe with the perfect balance of flavors.

  • Hi Jenn, I am cooking these for a party of 110 among other things.. How many eggs would you suggest? How early can I boil the eggs and is there a prep recommendation for this? I am trying to prepare what I can as early as possible.

    • Hi Justine, It’s honestly hard to say how many of these you should prepare as it really depends on how many other things you’ll be serving. You can boil the eggs up to a couple of days ahead of time and could prepare and refrigerate mayo mixture that gets mixed with the egg yolks in order to cut down on the steps right before the event. Hope that helps!

    • Justine,
      Probably too late, but you can buy precooked hard-boiled eggs at Costco and save a big step in
      large-volume cooking. I also suggest finely chopped shallots in the yolk mixture.

      • — Lorraine on March 25, 2023
      • Reply
  • I consider myself to be a snobbish “Deviled Egg” connoisseur. These are by far the best I have ever made and/or have had. Thank you for sharing….

    • — Scott Fishburn
    • Reply
  • Love your recipe, thanks! I have found that eggs, even fresh eggs, cooked on low pressure in a pressure cooker for 4 minutes with a 5-minute pressure release time are easy to peel! I learned this method from Laura Pazzaglia’s book “Hip Pressure Cooking”.

    • Any peeling tip is gratefully considered here, I am the Loser Peeler.

      • Hi Doug, I know this can be a frustrating process! I find I have the best luck if I gently crack the eggs all over and then peel them under running water.

  • Hi Jenn,

    First of all, big fan here! I don’t have whole grain mustard so am planning to sub Dijon. Would I need to make any adjustments in the mustard or vinegar measurements?

    Thanks,

    • Hi Kathy! No need to make any changes – Dijon should work fine. 🙂

  • STOP READING REVIEWS & MAKE THESE EGGS NOW!!!

    These deviled-eggs are SHOW-STOPPERS! EVERY SINGLE EGG WAS EATEN!!!!

    Guests stopped me to compliment the deviled egg, and many said that these were the best deviled eggs they ever ate!! THANKS JEN!!!!

    I’m an experienced home cook but only made deviled eggs 1x.

    The egg filling was really delicious, with a good amount of kick & made you want to go back for seconds & thirds.

    Hosted an annual New Year’s Day bash for 35, and quadrupled the recipe. Definitely appreciative of the great advice in the cookbook about cooking ahead but keeping the filling separate from the egg whites. I also chopped my decorative herbs a day ahead & put that in a snack ziplock bag – Worked like a charm!

    NEW TO DEVILED EGGS? Here is a tip:
    Followed recipe exactly. The only thing for me that I struggled with was consistently/easily getting the shell off the egg so I lost some egg …because 2-3 egg halves ripped in half. My eggs were probably too fresh – so user error, but the SUGGESTION FOR NEWBIES is BOIL MORE EGGS THAN YOU NEED!! 😀 then you’ll definitely have enough of the pretty white egg halves to serve, especially if you wanted to have say, at least X number of pieces.

    For those who LOVE bacon – check out Jen’s cookbook she has a variation with candied bacon. Believe it or not, a lot of my guests don’t eat bacon (what?? I know!) so this was a great variation that everyone could enjoy.

  • This is now my go-to deviled egg recipe. My dear, sweet other half insists that I make these whenever I plan to make deviled eggs for a gathering. I use a small food processor to blend and smooth the yolks and most other ingredients and stir in herbs as a last step. You simply must make these eggs!

  • What is a good substitute for mayonnaise in this case? I have been wanting to learn making deviled eggs but if I can avoird purchasing mayonnaise that would be superb. (Also I would like to note that the best Deviled eggs I have had were made sans the mayo but I never learned what was subbed instead!)

    • Hi Kat, One reader mentioned they used tzatziki in place of the mayo and were happy with the result. Hummus may work here too or you could try greek yogurt (but they will be more tart with greek yogurt). Hope that helps!

  • Adding 1 tsp of prepared horseradish gives this dish a zesty flavor layer. For those who hate mayo, try substituting tzatziki.

  • What a great technique for making deviled eggs! The filling is delicious and smooth. I used Smoked Paprika on top and the results were outstanding.

  • I followed it exactly since I wanted easy peel! And it worked! The sieve made the filling so creamy. Thank you Jen! We serve this at Christmas.

  • This recipe is fantastic as is – will definitely be making again!

  • My husband really liked these, and the egg boiling and peeling techniques worked perfectly, good recipe. Watch your pour on the apple cider though, you can taste it in the filling.

  • I love this recipe. It was amazing. Will definitely make again and again.

  • How far in advance can these be made? Could I make them a day ahead? How should they be stored?

    • Hi Eva, The whole eggs can be cooked and stored whole in the refrigerator several days ahead of time. The empty egg halves and filling mixture can be refrigerated separately, wrapped tightly in plastic wrap, for up to 2 days. Bring to room temperature and taste and adjust seasoning if necessary before filling. The eggs should be filled as close to serving time as possible.

  • I have only made deviled eggs with pickles, etc. and they were so so. These, with the addition of using the fine sieve were perfection. I added dill only. I did learn to use older eggs for easy peeling.

    • — Barbara Dowtin
    • Reply
  • Hi Jennifer,
    Which herbs are in the photo? Inquiring minds want to know. Thanks!

    • Hi Susan, I used dill, tarragon, parsley and chives. ?

  • Another great recipe – similar to deviled egg recipes from the past but better! This will be my new “go to” recipe for deviled eggs. A hit at Easter dinner!

  • Tried these today since I had so much leftover boiled eggs from Easter. Everyone really liked them! Easy to make and delicious; another great recipe!

  • Hi Jenn, I made these for Easter yesterday and topped them with smoked ham. They were wonderful and gobbled up in a flash! Thank you for the tip on the sieve — it really did make the filling nice and smooth.

  • Hi Jennifer,

    My husband hates mayonnaise and vinegar! If I substitute strained lemon juice for the vinegar, do you have a suggestion for a mayonnaise substitute? Maybe humus? I know this will not be traditional deviled eggs but maybe it will be tasty anyway.

    • Hi Helane, hummus could work here or you could try greek yogurt (although they will be more tart with greek yogurt).

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