Onion-Braised Beef Brisket

Tested & Perfected Recipes

This beef brisket is cooked on top of a massive heap of onions, which slowly caramelize and make a flavorful French onion soup-like gravy.

This beef brisket recipe comes from Nach Waxman, owner of the beloved New York City cookbook shop Kitchen Arts & Letters. It was originally published in The Silver Palette New Basics Cookbook in 1989, and apparently, it is the world’s most Googled brisket recipe. The recipe is surprisingly simple. Unlike all other briskets I’ve made, there’s no wine, stock or bottled sauces added. Instead, the brisket is cooked on top of a massive heap of onions, which slowly caramelize and release their juices, making a flavorful French onion soup-like braising liquid all their own.

I’ve made a few tweaks to the recipe over the years but you can find the original version here. Go ahead and make it ahead of time; it tastes even better the next day.

What You’ll Need To Make Onion-Braised Beef Brisket

brisket ingredients
Butchers typically sell two types of brisket: flat cut and point cut. These two pieces together make up a full brisket, a large slab of muscle from the cow’s chest. The point cut has more marbling, while the flat cut (also called first cut or center cut) is lean but topped with a thick fat cap. This recipe calls for a first cut/flat cut brisket. Don’t let your butcher trim all the fat off! A small fat cap bastes the meat, adding flavor and keeping it from getting dry and tough.

Step-by-Step Instructions

Begin by seasoning the meat with lots of kosher salt and pepper.

seasoning the brisket with salt and pepper

Dust both sides with flour.

dusting the brisket with flour

Heat the oil in a heavy flameproof roasting pan or ovenproof enameled cast iron pot until shimmering, then sear the brisket on both sides until brown and crusty in spots.

searing the brisket on the stovetop

Transfer the meat to a platter, then add the onions to the pan.

adding the onions to the roasting pan

Cook, stirring and scraping up the browned bits from the bottom of the pan, until softened and golden brown, about 15 minutes.

browned onions

Place the brisket back in the pan on top of the onions and spread the tomato paste on top. Scatter the carrots and garlic around the edges.

brushing the brisket the tomato paste

Cover the pan tightly with aluminum foil or a lid, and bake for 1-1/2 hours.

Remove the pan from the oven and transfer the brisket to a cutting board. Using an electric or sharp knife, slice the beef into 1/8 – 1/4-inch thick slices against the grain. It’s much easier to cut at this point than it is at the end.

slicing the brisket

Place the slices back in the pan on an angle, so that the top edge of each slice is showing. Baste the meat with the pan juices.

arranging the brisket back in the pan

Cook for a few more hours, until the meat is tender.

fully cooked brisket right out of the oven

You can serve it right away, but it’s better to refrigerate it overnight and reheat it the next day. It also freezes well.

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Onion-Braised Beef Brisket

This beef brisket is cooked on top of a massive heap of onions, which slowly caramelize and make a flavorful French onion soup-like gravy.

Servings: Serves 8 to 10
Prep Time: 30 Minutes
Cook Time: 3 Hours 30 Minutes
Total Time: 4 Hours

Ingredients

  • 1 5-6 pound first-cut (or flat-cut) beef brisket, trimmed so a thin layer of fat remains in some spots (do not over trim!)
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour (okay to substitute matzo cake meal for Passover)
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 8 medium yellow onions, peeled and sliced 1/2-inch thick
  • 3 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 3 cloves garlic, roughly chopped
  • 6 carrots, peeled and sliced into large chunks on a diagonal
  • Handful fresh chopped parsley, for garnish (optional)

Instructions

  1. Set an oven rack in the middle position and preheat the oven to 350°F.
  2. Season the brisket on both sides with the salt and pepper. Lightly dust the brisket with the flour, then shake and turn to coat evenly. Heat the oil over medium-high heat in a heavy flameproof roasting pan or ovenproof enameled cast-iron pot just large enough to hold the brisket and carrots snugly. Add the brisket to the pan and sear on both sides until crusty brown areas appear on the surface, 5 to 7 minutes per side.
  3. Transfer the brisket to a platter, then add the onions to the pot and stir constantly with a wooden spoon, scraping up any browned bits stuck to the bottom of the pot. Cook until the onions are softened and golden brown, about 15 minutes. (If browned bits stick to the bottom of the pan and start to burn, add a few tablespoons of water and scrape with a wooden spoon to release them.)
  4. Turn off the heat and place the brisket, fatty side up, and any accumulated juices on top of the onions. Spread the tomato paste evenly over the brisket, then scatter the garlic and carrots around the edges of the pot. Cover the pot very tightly with aluminum foil (preferably heavy-duty or two layers) or a lid, then transfer to the oven and cook for 1-1/2 hours.
  5. Transfer the brisket to a cutting board and, using an electric or very sharp knife, slice the meat across the grain into approximately 1/8 - 1/4-inch-thick slices. Return the slices to the pot, overlapping them at an angle so that you can see a bit of the top edge of each slice. The end result should resemble the original unsliced brisket leaning slightly backward. Cover the pot tightly and return to the oven.
  6. Lower the heat to 325°F and cook the brisket until it is fork-tender, 1-3/4 to 2-1/2 hours, or longer if necessary. The brisket is ready to serve with its juices, but it is even better the second day. (Note: If the sauce seems greasy, transfer the meat and vegetables to a platter and cover with foil to keep warm. Pour the sauce into a bowl and let sit until the fat rises to the top. Using a small ladle, spoon out the fat. Pour the skimmed gravy back over the meat.)
  7. Make-Ahead/Freezer-Friendly Instructions: The brisket can be made up to 3 days ahead of time and refrigerated. Reheat the brisket in a 300°F oven until hot, about 45 minutes. The brisket also freezes well for up to 2 months; defrost in the refrigerator 2 days ahead of time.

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Reviews & Comments

  • Another big winner! 2 questions: Do you use an All Clad STAINLESS steel Roaster! Why don’t you use a Dutch oven?
    With the tomato paste on top I heard you should put parchment paper then tin foil to cover tightly.
    Thank you, big fan
    Edie

    • — Edythe Davis on December 12, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Edie, I use a roasting pan because my Dutch oven isn’t large enough to hold the whole brisket (but if you can fit it, a Dutch oven will work). And I’ve never used parchment paper under the foil for this, but if you’d like to, there’s no reason you can’t. Hope that clarifies and that you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on December 14, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hello Jenn!

    For your Onion Braised Brisket recipe how would I adjust it to feed 14 rather than 8-10?

    Thanks,

    Jeanine Heron

    • — Jeanine Heron on December 11, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Jeanine, I’d suggest multiplying all the ingredients by 1.5. Hope everyone enjoys!

      • — Jenn on December 11, 2020
      • Reply
  • Looking forward to making this with the 6 lb. brisket I have in the freezer. My brisket is really long and won’t fit it my Le Creuset. I don’t think my roasting pan is meant for the stove top. Can I cut the brisket in half and sear in 2 batches then transfer to the roasting pan?

    • — Jill C. on December 11, 2020
    • Reply
    • Sure, that should work. Enjoy!

      • — Jenn on December 11, 2020
      • Reply
  • My mother used to make brisket like this but would have the butcher cut a pocket and she would put stuffing in it. Was one of my favorite dishes. Do you think I could do the same with this recipe?

    • — Liz on December 9, 2020
    • Reply
    • Sure, Liz, I think that would work. 🙂

      • — Jenn on December 12, 2020
      • Reply
  • The brisket is dry – should I add beef stock or water? How can I make it moist without overcooking? thanks

    • — Susan on December 5, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Susan, I’d go with beef stock. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on December 5, 2020
      • Reply
  • I am making this recipe to freeze. Is it better to slice it at the 1.5 hour mark or keep it whole, freeze and then cut when defrosted and cook. I want to keep it juicy and not let it dry out.

    • — Jill on December 2, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Jill, I’d slice it first. Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on December 2, 2020
      • Reply
  • Delicious!

    • — Donna on November 12, 2020
    • Reply
  • This always our favorite recipe!! It’s so delicious. Followed the recipe just as Jenn had written it. Such a simple, but yet so flavorful dish. I also tried this exact recipe with stew meat and the flavors weren’t the same and it got tender a lot faster but it was also delicious. Not as delicious as the beef Brisket though. Thank you so very much for sharing and inspiring people with delicious food.

    • — Erika E on October 13, 2020
    • Reply
  • What can I say .How about OMG! This was my first ever brisket (other than buying a sandwich
    at a deli) that I cooked myself. It was fantastic .I followed Jenn’s instructions with very minor changes. The brisket I bought had about 1/4 inch solid fat cap on one side . After browning both sides instructions said to cook fat side up and cover it with tomato paste .I did that but Jenn’s photo showed lean meat on side she put tomato paste .Anyway I put it in pot fat side up.After 1 and 1/2 hours ,I took it out to slice as per instructions .At that point I cut off the fatty part as i sliced it and layered brisket ,this time lean side up and put more tomato paste on the part facing up. I basted brisket every 30 minutes for second half of cooking.I used a heavy enameled cast iron pot and put a piece of aluminum foil between lid and pot to make sure it sealed well. Also made side dish of au jus as some said theirs was dry. Wasn’t needed .Brisket was the best ever .Took two plates of dinner to neighbors .Was too chilly to have them over to eat on the deck ( no guests in house right now ). Have leftovers for tonight.Can’t really describe how good this was .Our border is closed .Good thing Jenn’s recipes are open!
    Have a question. Should i have cut off the fat cap in the beginning? It was 1/4 inch thick and covered all of one side.
    Ron Vaage
    Vancouver BC
    Canada

    • — ron vaage Vancouver BC on September 28, 2020
    • Reply
    • Glad you enjoyed this so much!! No, a bit of a fat cap is good and helps to baste the meat and make it flavorful.

      • — Jenn on September 28, 2020
      • Reply
  • This is now my go-to brisket recipe. Focus on the meat. Love the moisture comes from the onions. Great every time. My family has liked the three briskets I made within the last few months.

    Having some problems having sauce leftover. Using an enameled cast-iron 6-quart pot. Next time, I am going to add foil under the heavy lid.

    I used a point cut. My family liked it, I thought it was too greasy and hard to carve. Will use a well-marbled fat cut next time.

    Any temperature checks to help fine tune? Fine line between tender and crumbling.

    Great recipe. Appreciate the tomato paste, umami addition.

    • — Michael Isko on September 28, 2020
    • Reply
    • Glad you liked it! I really go based on texture (ensuring the meat is fork-tender) to make sure it’s done, but if you want to check it with a meat thermometer, you’d be aiming for about 200 degrees. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on September 29, 2020
      • Reply
  • Great recipe and very easy. I made a 3 lb brisket and divided all the other ingredients in half. The meat is juicy and tender and only required less than an additional hour after cutting.

    • — Susan on September 26, 2020
    • Reply
  • Best brisket recipe!!! I’ve been testing so many trying to get my brisket tender…this was by far the easiest and most delicious.

    • — Elizabeth Bukhshteyn on September 24, 2020
    • Reply
    • Best Brisket! I did mine in a large oblong Dutch oven . The piece was only 3.5lbs. I used sweet onions, I totally forgot the carrots when shopping! I served Jenn’s roasted Broccoli recipe as a side along with mashed potatoes.
      It was perfect!

      • — Elizabeth Chiapperino on October 4, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi – how much meat do I need for 4 people?
    Should I just half your recipe / ingredients?

    • — Deanne on September 17, 2020
    • Reply
    • Sure, that would work. You could also make the full recipe and freeze half of it for an easy meal in the future (it freezes beautifully). Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on September 18, 2020
      • Reply
      • Can I cook this in the oven? If so, how hot..how long? And slow cooker?

        • — janne cassidy on November 6, 2020
        • Reply
        • Yes, this is designed to be cooked in the oven at 350°F/175°C. It gets cooked in 2 rounds unsliced and then sliced. See the full recipe for the timing. And regarding a slow cooker, you could place the brisket in a slow cooker after going through the initial steps. Hope that helps!

          • — Jenn on November 6, 2020
          • Reply
  • I was cruising for a brisket recipe for Rosh Hashanah, and this one looked familiar. I saw it was derived from New Basics. Sure enough, it was on my shelf. I looked it up (since your list of ingredients is so far down the scroll that I couldn’t find it at first), and noticed that I had crossed out Noah’s 375 and made it 350, probably 30 years ago! Then I looked at your modifications, and saw that you had done the same. Anyway, from what I remember, this was an excellent brisket recipe, the classic Jewish holiday brisket that I’d grown up with. I cannot wait to make it again tomorrow for the holiday. Shanah Tovah!

    • — sari friedman on September 16, 2020
    • Reply
    • you could save scrolling time by using the ‘jump to recipe’ link at the top of the page lol Most online bloggers have that now.

      • — Catherine on March 9, 2021
      • Reply
  • This turned out Amazing! My only concern was it didn’t have gravy but looked like a dark sludge. I used a large Calphalon roasting pan and used a few teaspoons of beef broth when I check on it. Do you think it was the roasting pan size? It was a 2.7 lbs brisket. Maybe my onions? Not sure, but it was still delicious! Thank you.

    • — Linda R on September 7, 2020
    • Reply
    • Considering your brisket was only 2.7 pounds, I think the roasting pan was likely too large for it and that the onion mixture overcooked and gave you the dark sludge that you referred to. Glad the brisket tasted good though!

      • — Jenn on September 7, 2020
      • Reply
    • I made this yesterday and it was simply amazing! I may have over salted a teeny bit at the beginning but it was incredible. Even my extremely picky 8 year old loved it. Thanks!
      Note…I added more garlic cloves and then spread them on bread to serve alongside the dish. Delish.

      • — Rachel on December 20, 2020
      • Reply
  • Found this recipe and made it today. The whole family loved it! And I was happy I didn’t need to cook it all day long in a crock pot.

    • — JGO on August 26, 2020
    • Reply
  • I wanted to make something special for my husband’s birthday, so, as always, I looked for a recipe from Jenn! The brisket was incredibly moist and flavorful, perfect with her Buttermilk Biscuits and Make-Ahead Mashed Potatoes! My husband was thrilled. For others to note, I made it the day before and reheated in the oven at 300 for about 45 minutes (I had a 6 lb brisket). The ONLY change time I would make next time is to add a few more carrots, as I had room in my roasting pan and ended up with more meat leftover than carrots. What a delicious meal for two nights and perhaps a lunch!

    • — Karen on August 21, 2020
    • Reply
    • P.S. We had company over on Monday for dinner, and the majority of my recipes were yours, Jenn! She was so impressed that I immediately ordered her your original cookbook. Can’t wait to have your new one!

      • — Karen on August 21, 2020
      • Reply
  • I’ve spent the day cooking, now want to store overnight for tomorrow’s dinner. How do I store overnight?

    • — Philip on July 7, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Philip, you can just refrigerate it, tightly covered, overnight. 🙂

      • — Jenn on July 8, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi Jenn,

    I’ve been making this recipe for a couple of years with great success. I now have someone who has to limit their salt intake. Any substitute for salt or any experience making without salt? Thank you, Steve

    • — Steve Cohen on June 25, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Steve, glad you like this recipe! I don’t have experience making it without salt. It will definitely be more bland but if you can use a little salt, you can add it to taste when you eat it. I don’t have a suggestion for any alternatives to salt here, but this post has good general information for people that need to reduce or cut salt out of their diet. Hope it helps at least a bit!

      • — Jenn on June 25, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi Jenn,

    This looks amazing. What brand of roaster did you use? Thank you!

    • — Shannon C on June 6, 2020
    • Reply
    • All-Clad. Hope you enjoy the brisket if you make it! 🙂

      • — Jenn on June 8, 2020
      • Reply
      • Amazing just made it and it’s awesome

        • — Tim Feinberg on June 20, 2020
        • Reply
  • Can I make this in a crock pot?
    Can I add potatoes?

    • — Nanci on May 11, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Nanci, You could place the brisket in the slow cooker after going through the initial steps. And I think you could add potatoes to this. Enjoy!

      • — Jenn on May 11, 2020
      • Reply
  • When you take it out to slice it should you let the meat rest before cutting into it?

    • — Melissa on May 1, 2020
    • Reply
    • Usually, I let it sit for a few minutes after removing it from the oven the first time because it’s too hot to handle immediately. That said, you can let it sit for a bit longer before slicing if you’d like. Regardless, because you cook brisket for so long, it should come out tender.

      • — Jenn on May 1, 2020
      • Reply
    • If I have a whole brisket with both flat cut and point cut, can I make this recipe using the point cut portion as well?

      • — Karen on May 28, 2020
      • Reply
      • Hi Karen, I haven’t cooked a point cut, but, yes, I think it’s fine. Hope you enjoy!

        • — Jenn on May 31, 2020
        • Reply
  • Turned out delicious and tender! had never cooked brisket and this was a great recipe…thank you!

    • — JooJoo on April 26, 2020
    • Reply
  • Do you have a good brisket chili recipe that I can use the leftover brisket in? Thanks Perry

    • — Perry on April 12, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Perry, I don’t have a chili recipe that would be appropriate for these leftovers, but you could use the leftovers for any number of other dishes like quesadillas or French dip sandwiches. 🙂

      • — Jenn on April 13, 2020
      • Reply
  • I was only able to get a point cut brisket. Is there any way to modify this recipe for a 3.7 lb point cut? We made it last year with the flat cut and it was incredible!

    • — Aviva on April 10, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Aviva, I’ve never cooked a point cut brisket but I think it would be doable with no modifications. Just keep in mind that it will be fattier. Because it’s a little smaller, it may take a bit less time in the oven. (You’ll know it’s done when it’s fork-tender.) Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on April 14, 2020
      • Reply
  • This was my first time making brisket and will definitely be my go-to from now on. I have a family recipe that is similar but with little to no measurements/instructions so wanted something to follow more closely. I only had a 2lb brisket but it still cooked for the same amount of time because the meat only gets more tender with time and basically falls off of your fork. The onion “sauce” is caramelized to perfection and gives it a sweet but savory flavor. So happy I found this!

    • — Jackie W. on April 9, 2020
    • Reply
  • Emergency, I have a 7lb brisket. Sliced at 1.45 hours. It’s now been in for about 3.5 hours. It’s tough. It’s completely submerged in juices. Do you have a rescue plan?

    • — Denny on April 8, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Denny, It should eventually get tender; I’d keep cooking it.

      • — Jenn on April 8, 2020
      • Reply
  • This looks great, but what do you think would be the cook time for only 2 lbs of brisket?

    • — Lauren on April 7, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Lauren, If the brisket is only 2 pounds, I’d cut the remaining ingredients by half to two thirds. After the first 90 minutes in the oven and slicing the brisket, it’ll need less time back in the oven, but hard to say how much. I’d start checking it at about 1 hour and 15 minutes. (You’ll know it’s done when it’s fork-tender.) Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on April 8, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hello! Following this recipe for Passover. Do you trim off the fat layer after the first 1.5 hour cooking (when you slice the meat?). I’m assuming it would be easier to remove before slicing, but checking so it doesn’t end up too dry or tough. Thanks!

    • — Cat on April 7, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Cat, I’d wait until the end. It’s pretty easy to scrape excess fat off the slices if you need to (the fat really helps to baste and flavor the brisket while it’s cooking). Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on April 8, 2020
      • Reply
  • All I have is red onions. Can I use those? (Not sure if you’ll see this before I make it for Passover.) Going to cook it today.

    • — Sandy on April 7, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Sandy, I may be replying too late to be helpful, but red onions should work. 🙂

      • — Jenn on April 8, 2020
      • Reply
  • Eager to make this tomorrow for Passover. The only question is the flour. Is there any way to make it without the flour or to substitute in something else? Thanks so much in advance. Happy Passover

    • — G. on April 7, 2020
    • Reply
    • Sure, G, you can use matzo meal in place of the flour. Hope you enjoy and happy Passover! 🙂

      • — Jenn on April 7, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi Jenn, I ended up buying a double brisket. Should I just cut it in half and follow the rest of the instructions? Thank you!

    • — Olga on March 25, 2020
    • Reply
    • Sure, Olga, that will work. Enjoy!

      • — Jenn on March 25, 2020
      • Reply
  • Jenn, No need to post my question. I used the round Dutch oven for this today and seared the meat twice in it. It was crowded in the pot and next time I may get a smaller cut but it worked just fine. It is delicious–thank you again for the wonderful recipes!

    • — Janet on February 23, 2020
    • Reply
    • Sorry I’m just seeing your question now, Janet – glad it worked out! 🙂

      • — Jenn on February 23, 2020
      • Reply
  • This is a great recipe. Easy to make and with great flavor and texture. I have been cooking brisket for over 40 years and this is my new go to brisket recipe. Thank you Jenn

    • — Fred on February 16, 2020
    • Reply
  • While visiting friends I decided to make this recipe for beef brisket and it was a huge hit. My wife doesn’t like to eat beef and she just asked me to make another one of this recipe.
    It is a phenomenal recipe with incredible taste. I followed the recipe exactly as written and the
    results were terrific. The trick of slicing the beef brisket before it is finished renders beautiful
    slices and it presents well on a platter surrounded by the carrots and onions. This is a “forever”
    recipe. Thanks for another winning meal, Jenn!

    • — J. Brown on January 23, 2020
    • Reply
  • Delicious! The meat was super tender and flavorful.

    • — Olga on January 4, 2020
    • Reply
  • Hi Jenn, this recipe looks delicious. I was just wondering what the purpose was for slicing the meat half way through. I don’t cook meat very often so was just curious before attempting your recipe. Thanks Jenn.

    • — Lisa on December 29, 2019
    • Reply
    • Hi Lisa, the brisket is just much easier to cut at the halfway point than it is when it’s fully cooked. Hop you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on December 30, 2019
      • Reply
      • Can I make this without onions and carrots Tyia

        • — Dana on April 2, 2020
        • Reply
        • Hi Dana, You can omit the carrots, but you’ll need the onions.

          • — Jenn on April 3, 2020
          • Reply
  • I’ve purchased a whole brisket (flat with point attached) and will separate them to prepare this recipe with just the flat. The whole is 17 pounds, so I estimate the flat will be around 10 pounds, which likely will be ample for 16 folks at the table.

    Do you know what affect such a large piece of meat will have on its cooking time? I have read on the on hand that larger roasts by weight typically take longer to cook, but on the other hand I understand it’s also a function of the shape/volume of the roast. I tentatively plan to use a remote probe thermometer, and remove the brisket from the oven when it has reached 200 degrees.

    • — FXVonthron on December 25, 2019
    • Reply
    • FXVonthron, It’s really hard to say for all the reasons you mentioned but I would figure 30-40 minutes per pound when cooking between 325-350°F. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on December 27, 2019
      • Reply
  • Hi Jen,
    I’m hoping my Christmas dinner is as successful as Thanksgiving. Once again I will be using most of your recipes…always a hit!
    I’ve searched your reviews but wanted to make sure of a few things when making my 10 lb brisket. I would like to make this on either Monday or Tuesday for Christmas dinner.
    Does it matter if it stays refrigerated for 2 days instead of 1?
    I’m adding the carrots when reheating to prevent them from getting mushy but assuming they will be firm but not too though?
    I can wait and slice the brisket cold before reheating or should I still slice midway?
    I will double all ingredients and adjust cook time. How long do you think it’ll take? And reheat at 300 or 325 and do you think it’ll take much longer than 30 minutes? And lastly, I’m planning on making this in my stainless steel pan that I made my turkey in, would that work?

    • — Pam on December 18, 2019
    • Reply
    • Hi Pam, I’m flattered that you’re using my recipes for your X-mas dinner! Yes, you can definitely make this 2 days ahead instead of 1. I’m not sure I’d wait until reheating the brisket to add the carrots. Instead, you could put them in about halfway through the initial cooking time. You can definitely slice the brisket cold if you’d prefer. Either 300 or 325 degrees will work for reheating and I would count on at least 30 minutes, likely more. And, yes, a stainless steel roasting pan will work. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on December 20, 2019
      • Reply
  • This was excellent. I could not believe how much delicious sauce resulted from this method.
    I served with a lemon chive risotto and a sheet pan of roasted brussells sprouts, multi-color bell peppers, drizzled with balsamic vinegar. Great meal.

    • — Karen Calanchini on December 16, 2019
    • Reply
    • I forgot to mention, we like our carrots with a tad of crunch, so I added them just as the meat was getting beginning to pull easily and they came out perfect.

      • — Karen Calanchini on December 16, 2019
      • Reply
  • Hi Jen. Can this be made in an Instant Pot? What would the changes be? Thanks!

    • — Jen U. on December 8, 2019
    • Reply
    • Hi Jen, I don’t have enough experience with it to tell you confidently whether or not/how to convert this recipe to an instant pot, so you may want to take a peek at these tips. It looks like they could be useful in converting traditional recipes to ones that would work in a pressure cooker. Sorry I can’t be more helpful!

      • — Jenn on December 9, 2019
      • Reply
      • Thanks Jen.
        I made it the way you described and it was such a resounding success! So soft, gravy so perfect. I was so happy because I always wanted to make brisket but it never came out right. Thanks so much for an easy, perfect recipe. PS. I have made quite a few of your recipes and they have all come out just magnificent. I am always surprised how many internet recipes are not that good, even though they can have 500+ 5-star reviews. Thanks for being a place I can trust to give me an actual great recipe.

        • — Jen U. on December 9, 2019
        • Reply
        • Glad you’ve had success with the recipes, Jen! 💗

          • — Jenn on December 10, 2019
          • Reply
  • Hi Jenn- is there any way to make this gluten free? Hoping to prepare for Chanukah but MIL has gluten allergy

    • — Inna Brotine on December 2, 2019
    • Reply
    • Sure, Inna, you can replace the all-purpose flour with gluten-free flour. Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on December 2, 2019
      • Reply
    • Hi Jenn, I made my brisket in a roaster oven. I cooked it at the exact temps recommended, and it turned out perfectly. However, my roaster has 2 small vent holes in the lid. I taped foil over them, and it worked great. This one is a keeper!

      • — Lynn Kastner on December 20, 2019
      • Reply
  • Hi Jen,

    Can I use a Roaster oven? Will it be the same temperature?

    Thanks,

    Erika

    • — eelsb on November 26, 2019
    • Reply
    • Hi Erika, I’ve never used a roaster oven, but from what I just read online, I suspect you can keep it at the same temperature. Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 26, 2019
      • Reply
      • Thank you so much :). I am excited to make them and know It will be great. you have the best recipes. Can’t even imagine what your actual cooking would be like. It must be the bessssst.

        • — Eelsb on November 26, 2019
        • Reply
        • ❤️

          • — Jenn on November 27, 2019
          • Reply
      • This Christmas will be my third time making this recipe. My family and friends absolutely love it!

        • — Susan Henry on November 30, 2019
        • Reply
  • Hi Jenn — happy almost thanksgiving! two questions for you…
    1- Brisket for thanksgiving! I am planning to make this tomorrow and then refrigerate for two nights (not one) — which I assume is okay. Correct?
    2- I’d rather not slice midway (which I assume is okay!) since slicing the brisket when cold is pretty easy. If I don’t slice midway, what should my cooking time be?

    Thanks so much!

    • — Eve on November 25, 2019
    • Reply
    • Hi Eve, I love the idea of brisket for Thanksgiving! It’s perfectly fine to make it two days ahead, and it’s also fine to slice cold. Hope you enjoy it!

      • — Jenn on November 25, 2019
      • Reply
      • Thanks! If I don’t slice midway, what should my cooking time be? Thanks Jenn!

        • — Eve on November 25, 2019
        • Reply
        • Cooking time should remain the same as the recipe indicates. (You’ll know it’s done when it’s fork-tender.)

          • — Jenn on November 26, 2019
          • Reply
  • The taste was very good; personally, I put little by little about 500 ml broth during the second time in the oven to avoid the meat will be dry.

    • — Ellen on October 1, 2019
    • Reply
    • Ellen, did you use beef or chicken broth?

      • — Chris on November 30, 2019
      • Reply
      • Hi there. Can you use Vidalia onions instead of yellow? Or perhaps a mixture of both?

        • — Kelsi Wall Rose on July 4, 2020
        • Reply
        • Hi Kelsi, I’d recommend a mix of the two. I’d love to hear how it turns out!

          • — Jenn on July 5, 2020
          • Reply
  • I made the recipe and it came out great. I do have a question. The recipe calls for the brisket to be sliced after 1-1/2 hours of cooking. When I sliced the brisket, juices came pouring out of the meat. Wouldn’t it be better to let the brisket rest for 10 or 15 minutes before slicing? Wouldn’t that make the meat even juicier?

    Thanks. Great Recipe!

    • — Ken on October 1, 2019
    • Reply
    • Hi Ken, glad you enjoyed the brisket! Usually, I do let it sit for a few minutes after taking it out of the oven for the first time because it’s too hot to handle immediately. That said, feel free to let it sit for a bit longer before slicing if you’d like. Regardless though, because you cook brisket for so long, it should come out tender.

      • — Jenn on October 3, 2019
      • Reply
  • Just fantastic. I used an oval Dutch oven and covered tightly with foil and the cover of the pot.

    • — Shelly on September 6, 2019
    • Reply
  • Stumbled on this recipe while browsing for new brisket making ideas. Fantastic recipe. Made it twice. First time I followed the directions exactly. The second I didn’t slice the brisket midway through cooking and the meat definitely came out juicier. I also added 1 tablespoon herb’s de provence, 3 bay leaves, and 2 tablespoons of worstechire sauce to the sauteed onions and sprinkled smoked paprika on top of the tomato paste topping. 4 1/2 stars for the original recipe and 5 stars with modifications. Will be making this on Labor Day for my father’s 69th birthday. Thanks so much and looking forward to trying your other recipes.

    • — MJG on August 26, 2019
    • Reply
    • I am cooking with your adaptations right now. I put a rub on mine in overnight (sm. paprika, salt pepper gran. garlic) and used Goya tomato sauce on top because I didn’t have any tomato paste. Great idea with the herbs de province, worcestshire and bay. I’m not going to cut it after the first hour and a half, and will leave it whole in the fridge overnight, and slice it when cold and then reheat. Thanks!

      • — John on January 18, 2020
      • Reply
  • Best brisket ever though I am waiting to try Jenn’s Moroccan version. I only knew brisket by the “BBQ” version. This is so amazing, I am going to throw away my old recipe. Have made it 4 times and always perfect. Follow recipe exactly (though I added a few more carrots since they are so yummy) and have the right pot or cover very tightly if using foil. I use a big dutch oven. Leftovers freeze great and I almost think taste better. Another great one, Jenn!

    • — Chriss on August 23, 2019
    • Reply
  • Hi, Jenn-

    First, let me qualify be saying that I am not Jewish, so making and eating brisket is not a regular thing with us – in fact, this was 1 of the first briskets of this type that I ever made. So Happy Shabbot to all of you all! Second, this recipe is too good to be true. It was super easy and the results were fabulous. I made it yesterday, so it had a chance to marry overnight in a big, juicy gravy. Juicy, moist and tender with fabulous slices to lay over my delicious mashers.

    The only problem that I encountered – when I went to reheat – and I used a 300 oven- I accidentally poked a hole in my aluminum foil and some of the liquid reduced so it wasn’t quite as juicy as I thought it would end up. Totally my fault – but left me wondering about the very best way to reheat- any advice??

    All-in-All- The fam loved it. We are having it 2 nights and my husband is already planning a brisket sammy for lunch on Monday. Night 3? Whatever is left is going into a Vegetable Soup! Thanks for another good recipe that I can count on.

    • — Lee Ann Carr on August 17, 2019
    • Reply
    • So glad you enjoyed the brisket, Lee Ann! You can always add a little liquid to the brisket when you reheat it if it seems dry; I’d start with a cup of chicken broth and add more as needed.

      • — Jenn on August 18, 2019
      • Reply

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