Coq au Vin

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Coq au vin is a hearty French stew of chicken braised in red wine with mushrooms and crisp pancetta.

Rich and brimming with flavor, coq au vin is a classic French stew of chicken braised in red wine with mushrooms and crispy pancetta. It’s the perfect cooking project to tackle on a chilly weekend when you’ve got a few hours to burn; naturally, anything that tastes this wonderful takes some time. As with most stews, it is even better the next day, and it freezes well, too.

I love coq au vin with buttered egg noodles, mashed potatoes, or a good crusty bread — basically anything to soak up the full-flavored sauce. If you like my Beef Bourguignon, you’ll love this recipe, too.

What You’ll Need To Make Coq au Vin

ingredients for Coq au Vin

Before we get to the step-by-step, a few notes about the ingredients:

  • Traditional recipes for coq au vin call for a whole cut-up chicken (a coq is an old rooster), but I prefer to use only bone-in chicken thighs only. The thighs remain tender and succulent when braised for a long time, whereas white meat tends to dry out.
  • Pancetta is simply Italian bacon. Instead of being smoked like American bacon, it is cured with salt and spices and then dried. You can find it in the deli at most supermarkets or precut and packaged in the refrigerated gourmet foods aisle, which is a great time saver.
  • For the wine, a Burgundy or Pinot Noir is traditional but any light or medium bodied red wine, such as Merlot or Zinfandel, will also work. You don’t need to use an expensive bottle; just make sure it’s good enough to drink (no supermarket cooking wine!).
  • Cognac, a type of French brandy, is delicious in cocktails like this pomegranate Sangria, but it also adds complex flavor to savory dishes like chicken Pot Pie, gravies, and stews.
  • You may notice that my recipe does not call for the traditional garnish of pearl onions. They can be difficult to find, and I actually prefer the stew without them. If you’d like to add them, be sure to brown them in butter and cook them thoroughly before adding them to the finished stew.

How To Make Coq au Vin

To begin, heat the oil in a large (5-qt) Dutch oven or heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Add the pancetta (or bacon) and cook until the fat has rendered and the pancetta is crispy, 5 to 8 minutes.
cooking pancettaUsing a slotted spoon, transfer the pancetta to a paper-towel-lined plate, leaving the fat in the pan. Season the chicken all over with 2 teaspoons salt and ½ teaspoon pepper. Increase the heat to medium-high and brown half of the chicken in a single layer, skin side down, until golden and crispy, about 5 minutes (brown on the skin side only). Using tongs, transfer the chicken to a plate; set aside.

browning chickenPour off all but about 2 tablespoons of the fat, then return the pot to the stove and reduce the heat to medium-low. Cook the onions, stirring occasionally, until softened and just starting to brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant, about 1 minute more.

cooking onions and garlic

Pour in the Cognac and cook, stirring to scrape the brown bits from the bottom of the pan, until the Cognac has evaporated.

deglazing the pan with Cognac

Add the wine, chicken broth, tomato paste, balsamic vinegar, sugar, thyme, bay leaf, and ½ teaspoon salt and bring to a boil.

bringing liquid to a boilReduce the heat to medium and gently boil, uncovered, for 15 minutes.

reduced liquid

Add the chicken and any accumulated juices from the plate back to the pot, along with the carrots. Bring to a simmer, then cover and cook over low heat for 30 minutes, or until the chicken and carrots are cooked through.

adding chicken and carrots to pot

While the chicken cooks, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the mushrooms and 1/4 teaspoon salt and cook, stirring frequently, until the mushrooms are golden brown, about 5 minutes. Set aside.

sautéed mushrooms

Also while the chicken cooks: In a small bowl, combine the softened butter and flour.

butter and flour in bowl

Mash with a spoon to make a smooth paste. In French, this is called a beurre manié (or kneaded butter). Set aside.

beurre manié

Using a slotted spoon, transfer the cooked chicken to a plate. The wine gives it a purplish hue.

cooked chicken on plate

Using a fork and knife, pull the skin off of the chicken (it should slide right off) and discard. The skin has served its purpose by lending flavor to the sauce and protecting the meat from drying out. You don’t have to do remove it, but it’s soggy at this point and I think the dish is more appetizing without it.

chicken with skin removedIncrease the heat in the Dutch oven/pot to medium and stir in three-quarters of the flour and butter paste.

adding beurre manié

Gently boil until the sauce is thickened, 5 to 7 minutes; add the remaining paste if you’d like the sauce a little thicker. Fish out and discard the bay leaf.

simmering sauce to thicken

Add the chicken and any accumulated juices back to the pot and simmer, uncovered, for about 10 minutes. Right before serving, stir in the browned mushrooms and pancetta. Taste and adjust seasoning, if necessary.

adding chicken. mushrooms, and pancetta back to pot

Serve immediately or let cool, chill in the refrigerator, and reheat when ready to serve.

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Coq au Vin

Coq au vin is a hearty French stew of chicken braised in red wine with mushrooms and crisp pancetta.

Servings: 6
Prep Time: 30 Minutes
Cook Time: 1 Hour 40 Minutes
Total Time: 2 Hours 10 Minutes

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 4 ounces diced pancetta (or bacon)
  • 8 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs (about 4 pounds), trimmed of excess skin (see note)
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 large yellow onion, roughly chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
  • 1/4 cup Cognac
  • 2-1/2 cups red wine, preferably Burgundy or Pinot Noir
  • 2-1/2 cups chicken broth
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves (or 1 teaspoon dried)
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 3 large carrots, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch chunks on the bias
  • 8 ounces sliced cremini mushrooms
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
  • 4 tablespoons all-purpose flour

Instructions

  1. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large (5-qt) Dutch oven or heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Add the pancetta and cook until the fat has rendered and the pancetta is crispy, 5 to 8 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the pancetta to a paper-towel-lined plate, leaving the fat in the pan.
  2. Season the chicken all over with 2 teaspoons salt and ½ teaspoon pepper. Increase the heat to medium-high and brown half of the chicken in a single layer, skin side down, until golden and crispy, about 5 minutes (brown on the skin side only). Using tongs, transfer the chicken to a plate; set aside. Repeat with the remaining chicken. Pour off all but about 2 tablespoons of the fat.
  3. Return the pot to the stove and reduce the heat to medium-low. Add the onions to the pot and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are softened and just starting to brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant, about 1 minute more. Add the Cognac and cook, stirring to scrape the brown bits from the bottom of the pan, until the Cognac has evaporated. Add the wine, chicken broth, tomato paste, balsamic vinegar, sugar, thyme, bay leaf, and ½ teaspoon salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium and gently boil, uncovered, for 15 minutes.
  4. Add the chicken and any accumulated juices from the plate back to the pot, along with the carrots. Bring to a simmer, then cover and cook over low heat for 30 minutes, or until the chicken and carrots are cooked through.
  5. While the chicken cooks, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the mushrooms and 1/4 teaspoon salt and cook, stirring frequently, until the mushrooms are golden brown, about 5 minutes. Set aside.
  6. Also while the chicken cooks: In a small bowl, mash the softened butter and flour to make a smooth paste. Set aside.
  7. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the cooked chicken to a plate.
  8. Increase the heat in the Dutch oven/pot to medium and stir in three-quarters of the flour and butter paste. Gently boil until the sauce is thickened, 5 to 7 minutes; add the remaining paste if you'd like the sauce a little thicker. Fish out and discard the bay leaf.
  9. Using a fork and knife, pull the skin off of the chicken and discard.
  10. Add the chicken and any accumulated juices back to the pot and simmer, uncovered, for about 10 minutes. Right before serving, stir in the browned mushrooms and pancetta. Taste and adjust seasoning, if necessary, then serve.
  11. Make-Ahead Instructions: Let cool to room temperature and then store in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. Reheat over medium-low heat on the stovetop before serving. (For best results, store the sautéed mushrooms and crispy pancetta in separate containers in the refrigerator and add before serving.)
  12. Freezer-Friendly Instructions: This can be frozen for up to 3 months. Before serving, defrost the stew in the refrigerator for 24 hours and then reheat on the stovetop over medium-low heat until hot.
  13. Note: Sometimes chicken thighs have excess skin and/or fat. Before cooking, using kitchen shears, trim any skin that extends farther than the edges of the chicken thigh, and snip off any excess fat.

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Reviews & Comments

  • This was bomb.com! I was so worried, especially because I’ve never had a sauce made from wine…but seriously, it was freaking amazing! I did not do the pancetta, used tomato sauce vs paste, and added extra carrots and it was so yummy! It’s a very kid friendly recipe- all the kids had seconds! It has been officially added to the family favs list! Thanks!

    • — Lexi on November 17, 2020
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  • Wow! I made this for dinner last night and it was exceptional!!
    I served it over mashed potatoes and added the pancetta as a garnish rather than stir it in.
    It added nice little crunchy bits. My partner and I loved it!

    • — Jane on November 15, 2020
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  • I’ve been remiss in letting you know how much I enjoy your recipes. This is now and old family favorite that we have shared many times over with friends. Sauce is so rich just dripping with flavors so distinctive. We serve with some tagliatelle and nice salad. It also travels and freezes well.

    • — Carl Crowe on November 12, 2020
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  • Perfect Coq au Vin! I cook and usually make some changes to recipes but not this one – it is perfect!

    • — CL on November 10, 2020
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  • I made this recipe tonight and it was wonderful. My husband can’t wait to have the leftovers later on this week. The recipe noted that this is even better the next day although I don’t know how much more delicious it can be!!!

    • — Patty on November 8, 2020
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  • In one word…..Wow! This recipe was absolutely fantastic. One of the best meals I can remember in a long time. Definitely have some crusty bread with it to soak up all the deliciousness left in the bottom of the bowl or you might have to resort to licking your bowl😂. The chicken turns out so tender and flavorful. Thank you, Jenn!

    • — Patricia on November 7, 2020
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  • Can I use olive oil instead of butter? Husband is lactose intolerant.

    • — Sue on November 7, 2020
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    • Hi Sue, I don’t feel confident that olive oil would work, but you could try it with coconut oil or margarine. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on November 10, 2020
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  • Can I substitute brandy for the cognac?

    • — Alyssa on November 6, 2020
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    • Yep 🙂

      • — Jenn on November 6, 2020
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  • My family and I absolutely loved it! I followed the recipe as is and it was perfect!

    • — Katherine on November 5, 2020
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  • I’ve wanted to try Coq Au Vin for years, but never did for some reason. After looking at a number of recipes I decided on yours. Made it last night and served over Yukon Gold mashed potatoes. It was absolutely delicious! I didn’t add the vinegar or sugar, but otherwise followed the recipe. Will definitely be in the fall/winter rotation from now on! Thank you!

    • — Cindy on November 5, 2020
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  • Made this a couple of nights ago and it turned out great! Only had 6 chicken thighs not 8 but didn’t adjust the amounts for the sauce. Great to sop it up with a fresh baguette! Not too many ingredients and a bit of wine left to have with the meal. Perfect! Thanks for another great recipe!

    • — Naz Sicherman on November 5, 2020
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  • Made Coq au Vin (just love saying it…feels very Parisian) last night for my husband, sister and brother-in-law and it was a BIG HIT. We made your crusty artisan bread recipe too to do the part of the “soaking up” and it was a perfect combination! Thank you for the very useful step-by-step picture guide to making our meal turn out wonderfully!

    • — Pamela Rosa on November 1, 2020
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  • I made this last night and it came out perfectly. The first time I had used the buerre technique and I am now a fan.
    So much better than frying the chicken in flour and making a roux etc.
    This goes into my favorites list.
    Thank you!

    • — ayeda on October 31, 2020
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  • I’ve been eyeing this recipe for awhile and I’m so glad I finally had a chance to make it! It was pouring rain all day and I never made it to the store, so didn’t have the bone-in thighs or mushrooms. I ended up using boneless, skinless chicken thighs that were in my freezer and added 2 extra carrots and a handful of frozen peas in place of the mushrooms. It was soooo good, even with my substitutions. The sauce is absolutely divine – restaurant quality! I’m looking forward to making it again and again, thank you!

    • — Donna on October 30, 2020
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  • Full of flavour! I did skip the cognac.

    • — Janet Oliver on October 30, 2020
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  • Hi Jenn,
    My husband and I love your recipes! I want to try the Coq au Vin but we aren’t mushroom fans. What would be a good substitution? Potatoes, chestnuts? Thanks again for all of your excellent content!
    Heather

    • — Heather on October 29, 2020
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    • So glad you like the recipes! You could replace the mushrooms with more carrots or use peas instead. Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on October 29, 2020
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      • Hi Jenn I really want to make this on the weekend but every time I come across a recipe that calls for browning skin on chicken I shudder! I have a Le Crruset Dutch oven and the chicken always seems to stick to the pan, what am I doing wrong HELP!! By the way I love your recipes😊

        • — Paula on October 29, 2020
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        • If it’s sticking, it likely means that it’s not browned enough. Once it’s sufficiently browned, it will more easily “release” from the pan. (And glad you like the recipes!)

          • — Jenn on October 29, 2020
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          • Delicious. I love stews in the fall. Great gravy for dripping bread. I used boneless thighs and was still good; just need to cook the meat for a shorter time.

            I like all your recipes. Your beef stew is fabulous.

            • — Matt on October 31, 2020
  • This dish was a huge hit! Will definitely make it again. Thanks for sharing the recipe.

    • — Anne on October 29, 2020
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  • WOW!!! I made this last night for dinner and the comments that were coming out of my husband and two picky sons were amazing! The sauce is absolutely delicious and the chicken was yummy. French bread is a MUST so you can soak up every last drop from your bowl. I almost took a picture of my son’s totally clean bowl after he ate everything. I followed the recipe exactly as it read. My only question is could I use boneless thighs next time. I know on the bone will always have better flavor but I feel like my boys would eat more chicken if they didn’t have to cut it off the bone.

    • — Laura on October 28, 2020
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    • Glad you liked this! The bones add a lot of flavor, so using boneless thighs will have an impact on the finished dish. Also, you won’t need to cook the chicken as long so it won’t get quite as infused with the other flavors. Last, it’s pretty hard to find boneless chicken thighs that have skin on them. All that said, technically you can do it!

      • — Jenn on October 28, 2020
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  • Made this for Sunday dinner and it was delicious – everyone loved it! It’s easy to make and would be nice enough to serve to guests. This dish will definitely be a cold weather favorite. Followed recipe exactly (except I only used 6 thighs because that’s how they were packaged at my store, and I added 1 extra carrot). I served it over plain rice. Thank you Jenn for another wonderful recipe.

    • — Stephanie on October 27, 2020
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  • Oops forgot my rating…5 star dish for sure!

    • — Cari- on October 26, 2020
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  • Made this for my husband and myself a few weeks ago, and the flavors were so perfectly melded, we were actually moaning—and I’m certain we both ate too much😳
    Served it with mashed potatoes. Will become a new favorite!
    Thank you!

    • — Cari- on October 26, 2020
    • Reply
  • Followed the recipe exactly. Guests raved. I get several requests for this dish during the month. Don’t mess with a good thing, recipe is perfect as is.

    • — Bruce Belligan on October 25, 2020
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  • Hello Jennifer!

    I would like to double this recipe for a large dinner party. Should I just double the recipe or do you recommend making two batches instead?

    I love all your recipes!

    Thank you-
    Jacqueline

    • — Jacqueline Loza on October 23, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Jacqueline, you could get away with making one large batch as long as you have a big enough pot. (You’ll just need to brown the chicken in several batches so they can be in a single layer.) Hope everyone enjoys!

      • — Jenn on October 23, 2020
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  • Hi Jenn made your beef stew last week it was excellent, the family enjoyed it with no leftovers. I have two sons who are the “pickiest “ eaters on the planet. They moped up every drop with French bread. Last night I made Coq au Vin in a cast iron 12 quart Dutch Oven it turned out absolutely superb. Thanks for the recipes

    • — Andre Blais on October 22, 2020
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  • Thanks Jen for another fail proof recipe!
    However due to lack of ingredients pancetta/bacon and a time crunch I did make some changes but it turned out to be an awesome family meal made within 30 min.
    I seared the chicken as instructed and removed from pan, I then sauteed onion and carrots for 5min I then added over low heat mushroom and garlic for 5 min and added tomato paste and flour. 2 min later added all other liquids and herbs and chicken back to pan and cooked over low heat for 20 min.
    Loved it.

    • — Georgina Rourke on October 17, 2020
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  • I submitted a question asking if I could add carrots to your Coq au Vin recipe. When looking over your recipe today, I realized that it does have carrots. I don’t know how I missed that. I guess I have to be more careful when reading recipes! Looking forward to trying your recipe. I used a recipe of yours for Brussels sprouts last night and it was a hit.

    • — Carol Towner on October 13, 2020
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    • Hope you enjoy it!

      • — Jenn on October 13, 2020
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  • Loved your recipe. The house smelled wonderful while it was cooking. The meat came out very tender, the sauce was delicious and the vegetables came out perfect. Your recipe is definitely a keeper. Thanks for sharing.

    • — Marsha Schwartz on October 7, 2020
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  • Hi Jenn!
    I made this last night and it was delicious!! Can’t wait for the leftovers today, and will definitely make again!
    Before making it, I browsed some French coq au vin recipes that called for the chicken to be marinated in wine prior to cooking but also called for an actual rooster rather than thighs. I was wondering if the reason for marinating in those recipes (but not in this one) is that a rooster is much tougher than regular chicken thighs? Figured you’d be the right person to ask.
    Thanks as always for your amazing recipes!

    • — Simone on September 25, 2020
    • Reply
    • Yes, I believe rooster meat is generally tougher than chicken thighs, so that’s likely why the marinating is included. (And glad you liked it!)

      • — Jenn on September 26, 2020
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  • I just got a Le Creuset braiser for my birthday. Would this recipe work in that, as opposed to a dutch oven?

    • — Michelle on September 20, 2020
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    • Sure, I think a braiser would work. Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on September 21, 2020
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  • Hi, I love your recipes, I’m a huge fan. What can I substitute the cognac with?

    • — stacey akdemir on September 9, 2020
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    • So glad you like the recipes! You can just omit the cognac — it will still be delicious — hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on September 10, 2020
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  • My wife has cooked for our family for 10 years. The last time she had Coq au Vin was overseas at a restaurant. You have made me an overnight celebrity, acing every dish from your website. Thank you so much!! I’ve purchased and received your cookbook as well.

    • — Neil on August 1, 2020
    • Reply
    • ❤️

      • — Jenn on August 2, 2020
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  • Jenn,
    Even though it’s sweltering hot right now, I’d like to make this as I’ve been making picnic meals for friends which we’ve had out in the glorious park round the corner where I live in Toronto. Since we’re not allowed to be inside with guests!!
    I have just one question. Since I agree that something like this tastes better the next day, should the mushrooms only be added the day it’s going to be served? Otherwise, I imagine they’ll be soggy and lose some of their mushroominess.
    And forgive me if this question has already been asked, but there are 121 reviews!!!
    Joy

    • — Joy on July 20, 2020
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    • Hi Joy, Yes, I’d store the mushrooms and pancetta in separate containers and add them right before serving. Hope everyone enjoys! 🙂

      • — Jenn on July 21, 2020
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      • In another reply on the thread, you mentioned it was fine to make the whole dish one day and serve the next. The above reply recommends storing the mushrooms and pancetta and adding the next day. I plan to make one day and serve the next so please let me know if one approach is better than the other or it will be fine with all ingredients added when cooking and serving the next day.
        I love your recipes!

        • — Nancy on January 14, 2021
        • Reply
        • Hi Nancy, Sorry for any confusion. If you want to make it ahead, I’d store the mushrooms and pancetta separately. Hope you enjoy!

          • — Jenn on January 15, 2021
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  • yikes. In France we always soak the chicken in the wine first. So odd that you leave out the thing that give it flavour. Also the order is wrong for adding beurre manié and never do you add balsamic vingear. I am sure this is a lovely American or British chicken with wine dish but it’s not coq au vin

    • — Lisette on June 29, 2020
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    • I made this last week and it turned out amazing! What surprised me the most was that during cooking, the whole house smelled like some of my favourite French restaurants where I am from in Canada, and made me think of being back home! (I had to walk in and out of the house a few times, just to get the full sensory/memory experience!) The kids (10 and 12) ate everything and even soaked up the juices with french bread like my Husband and I did. The flavour of this dish is built gradually throughout the cooking duration, and it was really neat to see how it evolved over the time it took me to make it! I hope folks don’t get too caught up in whether or not this recipe is truly “authentic” as most restaurants I’ve been to serve variations of the most traditional recipes, i.e. I definitely wouldn’t use Rooster meat here, as the traditional recipe calls for! I wouldn’t hesitate to make this recipe for guests. You know your audience well which is reflected in the way you set up and explain the recipes, ingredients, and techniques. I just started using your recipes and plan to do so for a long time. Thank you for all of your hard work!

      • — Shauna on July 19, 2020
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      • So glad you enjoyed this! 🙂

        • — Jenn on July 20, 2020
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    • Lisette,

      With all due respect, there are as many ways to make Coq au Vin and Boeuf Bourgignon in France as there are ways to make Lasagne or Minestrone in Italy. Food is endlessly interpreted by people, to their taste.

      I just wanted to address the rather sour review you’ve left.

      Joy in Toronto, city of immigrants from 110 countries who have all brought their cuisine with them

      • — Joy on October 24, 2020
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  • I have not made this dish in years! This recipe was worth the effort! May seem like a lot of prep but the end result is so worth it! When we are able t have dinner with family and friends I will be serving this! Hubby couldn’t stop praising me for this meal! Thank you for posting this delish meal!

    • — Sharon Caprani on June 14, 2020
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  • Fantastic. My family was amazed by this one. I have made so many of your recipes and ALL of them are amazing. Thanks for teaching me so many things. Blessings to you!

    • — Paula on May 2, 2020
    • Reply
    • 💓

      • — Jenn on May 3, 2020
      • Reply
  • Absolutely delicious and a great recipe to pass the time while at home. We used a Cabernet Sauvignon since it was the only red we had on hand and it still made for the perfect sauce. We can’t wait until we can entertain again because we will definitely be using this recipe!

    • — Kelli on April 24, 2020
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  • Excellent dinner choice to please a crowd!

    • — Emily Krebs on March 31, 2020
    • Reply
  • Hi Jenn,
    My husband does not eat pork. Can/should I substitute the bacon with turkey bacon or just skip this step altogether?

    • — Nitza Geiger on March 19, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Nitza, Turkey bacon would work here. You could also just omit the pancetta. (It will still be delicious.) Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on March 19, 2020
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  • I made this for our anniversary celebration instead of going out. My husband said it is restaurant quality….and was perfect….we didn’t waste one drop of that sauce. I followed the recipe as directed, except we pulled our skin off the thighs as we ate them….as dinner was already late…and didn’t want to take that extra step. Only thing I would change is to add more carrots and mushrooms. This was a simple dish with complex flavor. I made pearl couscous (toasted israeli style pasta) to go with this….it was perfect! Thank you!

    • — Karen T on March 19, 2020
    • Reply
    • Happy Anniversary, Karen! So happy you both enjoyed it. 💕

      • — Jenn on March 19, 2020
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  • Hi Jenn,

    I, too, want to add my thanks, appreciation, and praise for your wonderful site and book. Have been cooking for many years, with a cupboard full of cookbooks and recipes; but find myself turning to yours time and again, secure in the knowledge that I’ll find something enticing, relatively easy to prepare, and guaranteed to please.

    Planning on doing your Coq au Vin for eight people. Without going through the whole recipe, could you please tell me how you’d adjust ingredient quantities? Thanks so much.

    • — Jan on March 5, 2020
    • Reply
    • So glad you like the recipes, Jan!! ❤️
      To serve 8, I’d multiply all the ingredients by 1.5. Hope everyone enjoys!

      • — Jenn on March 5, 2020
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  • The absolute best I have ever made and guests agreed. I followed the recipe exactly and would not change a thing. I have made MANY of your recipes and they never disappoint. Your thoroughness and attention to detail are greatly appreciated. I wish other sources would do the same. By the way, I have been a serious cook for 40 years and don’t give praise easily!

    • — Richard Hassall on March 4, 2020
    • Reply
    • So glad you enjoyed it!! 🙂

      • — Jenn on March 5, 2020
      • Reply
  • finally making for company…want to time it with the noodles
    how long to reheat and at what temperature…med or med/low
    thanks Jenn

    • — Carol Winkelman on February 28, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Carol, It’s hard to give an exact number, but I would guess that it might take about 10 minutes over medium heat. You could also reheat it 30 minutes before you plan to serve, then take it off the heat, cover, and keep warm. Simply place the stew back on the heat for a few minutes while you boil the noodles so it’s hot to serve. Hope everyone enjoys!

      • — Jenn on February 28, 2020
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  • Excited to try this recipe this weekend! Jenn, is there a type of cognac you recommend, or could I use brandy that’s already in my liquor cabinet as substitute?

    • — Maggie on February 27, 2020
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    • Hi Maggie, I use Courvoisier but if you already have brandy in your liquor cabinet, I’d just use that. Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on February 27, 2020
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  • Hi Jenn,
    I just made this for Valentine’s dinner for my husband. I have made a lot of your recipes and they have always been a hit but this was the best bar none he said! I used bacon because it’s what I had and used whisky instead of cognac to deglaze the pan. Outstanding! Spectacular! Best ever! Thanks so much for making me look so good!

    • — Nancy Mayville on February 14, 2020
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  • If anyone is interested, I very successfully substituted grape juice (type with no sugar added) and a dash of red wine vinegar in place of the red wine. Also omitted the cognac. And I halved the recipe. So I basically butchered the recipe as listed and it’s probably not authentic AT ALL but it still tasted AMAZING. Can’t wait til I’m no longer pregnant and will be back to cooking with (and drinking!) wine! I’m sure when the coq is actually paired with the vin it’ll taste even more fab!

    • — Suzanne on February 13, 2020
    • Reply
    • Thanks for weighing in Suzanne — I’m sure readers will appreciate hearing how your non-alcoholic version worked out!

      • — Jenn on February 14, 2020
      • Reply
  • I made this recipe, and my wife and I both thought the finished dish was terrific. We did let it rest overnight in the fridge, and re-heated it for our lunch. Great! By the way, I love how your recipes begin with an extended “lesson” with step-by-step photos, with tips and comments along the way, before you get to the “short-form” recipe. Very helpful, very clever!

    • — Loren Chudy on February 13, 2020
    • Reply
  • Would 4.5 qt. Le creuset work for this recipe?

    • — Beth on February 4, 2020
    • Reply
    • It should fit, but you won’t have much room to spare! 🙂

      • — Jenn on February 4, 2020
      • Reply
      • I did try the 4.5 pan and there really wasn’t enough room so I ended up transferring it to a bigger pan in the end. It turned out to be delicious. Another great recipe from your repertoire!

        • — Beth on February 13, 2020
        • Reply
        • Sorry to have misled you a bit, but glad it turned out well. Thanks for reporting back in as your follow up will be helpful for other readers!

          • — Jenn on February 13, 2020
          • Reply
  • Did you serve with brown rice in promo photo ? I 💕your beef stew with red wine as so worth the time & effort as all you recipes are perfection !

    • — Patricia on January 31, 2020
    • Reply
    • So glad you like the recipes, Patricia! No, I’ve never served this over brown rice, but you could. I really like it best over buttered egg noodles or mashed potatoes. 🙂

      • — Jenn on January 31, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hello! Sorry to ask such a sill question but I am new to cooking, do I go to the liquor store to purchase the Cognac or is there a cooking Cognac in the stores. Same question as the red wine. Can that be purchased in a store. I don’t drink so I know nothing about them. Thanks!

    • — Kim Motley on January 30, 2020
    • Reply
    • **silly**

      • — Kim Motley on January 30, 2020
      • Reply
    • Hi Kim, You can get the wine at a grocery store (if it’s available where you live) but you’ll probably have to go to the liquor store for the cognac.

      • — Jenn on January 30, 2020
      • Reply
  • This recipe is easy, and the result is absolutely delicious! I made it for the first time a couple of weeks ago, and I’m making it again tomorrow. Luckily, a friend had been given me a bottle of French cognac for Christmas, so I didn’t need to go and buy one. My company raved about this coq au vin! I used gluten free flour, and the sauce was perfect.

    • — Joyce on January 30, 2020
    • Reply

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