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Kentucky Butter Cake

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Kentucky Butter Cake

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This old-fashioned vanilla butter cake drenched in syrup is the 1963 winner of the Pillsbury Bake-Off Contest.

I have no clue why this delicious butter cake is named for the state of Kentucky, but the recipe has been around since at least 1963, when Nell Lewis of Platte City, Missouri entered it into the Pillsbury Bake-Off Contest and won. It’s an old-fashioned vanilla buttermilk pound cake drenched in a luscious butter and sugar syrup. The syrup not only moistens the cake (and I mean really moistens) but it also creates a crisp coating on the surface, almost like a glazed donut. Kids love it, grown-ups love it—this simple butter cake is hard to beat. A big thank you to my longtime reader, Karen Tannenbaum, for sharing the recipe with me.

What you’ll need To Make Kentucky Butter Cake

ingredients for Kentucky butter cake

Before we get to the step-by-step instructions, a few words about the method. This butter cake is a “high-ratio” cake, which means that the weight of the sugar equals or exceeds the weight of the flour. Instead of the more common “creaming” method (where the butter and sugar are beaten together before the eggs, flour, and liquid are added), high-ratio cakes can be made using the “high-ratio” method, which involves mixing all the dry ingredients with the butter and some of the liquid first, then adding the remaining liquid ingredients.

The high-ratio method is not only easier than the traditional creaming method, but it also yields super tender and fine-textured cakes. (Other high-ratio cakes on the site include yellow cake, pound cake, rum cake, and marble cake.)

How to make kentucky butter cake

buttermilk, eggs and vanilla in bowlIn a medium bowl or liquid measuring cup, combine the buttermilk, eggs, and vanilla.

whisked buttermilk, eggs, and vanilla in bowl

Whisk and set aside. (Note that the mixture will start to look curdled as it sits; that’s okay.)

dry ingredients in mixer

In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment or beaters, combine the flour, granulated sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Beat on low speed for 30 seconds to combine.

mixing dry ingredients in mixer

Add the soft butter and half of the buttermilk mixture. adding butter and buttermilk mixture to dry ingredients

Mix on low speed until moistened but still a little crumbly, about 1 minute.

mixing wet and dry ingredients

With the mixer running on low, gradually add the remaining buttermilk mixture.

mixing wet and dry ingredients

Increase the speed to medium and mix for three minutes, stopping once to scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl with a rubber spatula. The batter should look pale and creamy.

Kentucky butter cake batter

Transfer the batter to a Bundt pan sprayed with Baker’s Joy or Pam with Flour.

Kentucky butter cake ready to bake

Bake for 1 hour, or until a cake tester comes out clean. Set the pan on a cooling rack.

baked Kentucky butter cake cooling on rack

How to make the glaze

While the cake cools, make the glaze. In a small saucepan, combine the butter, granulated sugar, water, and vanilla.

glaze ingredients in a sauce pan

Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer until the sugar is dissolved, about 1 minute.

simmering glaze ready for cake

Using a skewer or toothpick, poke about 40 holes in the bottom of the still-warm cake, going about 3/4 of the way down.

poking holes in bottom of Kentucky butter cake

Spoon half of the glaze evenly over the bottom of the cake. spooning glaze over cake

If the glaze starts to pool on the surface, poke more holes to help it sink in. Leave the cake on the rack to cool for 30 minutes.

poking more holes in cake

Invert the cake onto a serving platter.

Kentucky butter cake inverted on platter

Brush the remaining glaze evenly over the top and sides of the cake, letting it soak in as you go. (Go slowly so that the cake absorbs the glaze.)

brushing the glaze over the top of the cake

Let the cake sit for at least one hour before serving. Right before serving, use a fine sieve to dust the top of the cake with confectioners’ sugar.

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Kentucky Butter Cake

This old-fashioned vanilla butter cake drenched in syrup is the 1963 winner of the Pillsbury Bake-Off Contest.

Servings: One 10-in Bundt Cake
Prep Time: 20 Minutes
Cook Time: 1 Hour
Total Time: 1 Hour 20 Minutes, plus 1 hour and 30 minutes to cool

Ingredients

For the Cake

  • 1 cup buttermilk (see note)
  • 4 large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour, spooned into measuring cup and leveled-off
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened
  • Confectioners' sugar, for dusting

For the Glaze

  • 5 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • ¾ cup granulated sugar
  • ¼ cup water
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Instructions

For the Cake

  1. Preheat the oven to 325°F and set an oven rack in the middle position. Spray a 12-cup Bundt pan with nonstick cooking spray with flour, such as Baker's Joy or Pam with Flour.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, and vanilla. Set aside. (Note that the mixture will start to look curdled as it sits; that's okay.)
  3. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment or beaters, combine the flour, granulated sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Beat on low speed for 30 seconds to combine. Add the soft butter and half of the buttermilk mixture and mix on low speed until moistened but still a little crumbly, about 1 minute. With the mixer running on low, gradually add the remaining buttermilk mixture, then increase the speed to medium and mix for three minutes, stopping once to scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl with a rubber spatula. The batter should look pale and creamy. Scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl again, making sure the batter is evenly mixed.
  4. Transfer the batter to the prepared pan and bake for 1 hour, or until a cake tester comes out clean. Set the pan on a cooling rack. Using a skewer or toothpick, poke about 40 holes in the bottom of the still-warm cake, going about ¾ of the way down. Spoon half of the glaze evenly over the bottom of the cake. If the glaze starts to pool on the surface, poke more holes to help it sink in. Leave the cake on the rack to cool for 30 minutes.
  5. Invert the cake onto a serving platter. Brush or spoon the remaining glaze evenly over the top and sides of the cake, letting it soak in as you go. (Go slowly so that the glaze gets absorbed.) Let the cake sit for at least one hour before serving. Right before serving, use a fine sieve to dust the top of the cake with confectioners' sugar.

For the Glaze

  1. In a small saucepan, combine the butter, granulated sugar, water, and vanilla. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer until the sugar is dissolved, about 1 minute.
  2. Note: If you’d like to make your own buttermilk, check out the easy method here.
  3. Make-Ahead Instructions: This cake keeps well for several days. Once cool, store in a cake dome (or cover with plastic wrap) at room temperature until ready to serve.
  4. Freezer-Friendly Instructions: The cake can be frozen for up to 3 months. After it is completely cooled, double-wrap it securely with aluminum foil or plastic freezer wrap, or place it in heavy-duty freezer bag. Thaw overnight on the countertop before serving.

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Comments

  • I have made this recipe 3x’s and its (Excellent) the first time the cake got stuck inspite of greasing the bunt pan like a crazy person.

    I found this recipe called MAGIC RELEASE.
    1/2 cup of all purpose flour
    1/2 cup shortening
    1/2 cup vegetable or canola oil
    Add all of these items into a big bowl and mix them together with hand mixer until you have no lumps and then store it in a container. when your need a cake pan greased, give it a quick stir and use a pastry brush to apply a generous layer to the inside of your cake pan.

    It has no taste and does not leave anything on the outside of the cake and I have not had one cake stick yet!

  • I can’t find Pam with Flour. Can I use something else?

    • Sure, Susan. Baker’s Joy works well, or you can spray the pan with nonstick spray and then coat with flour.

  • Jen
    I recently had a butter cake that was to DIE FOR! However it was not a bundt cake. It was baked in a pan and cut into squares. I’ve been searching for a “butter cake”, do you think this recipe can be made in a pan and served in squares?
    Fingers croseed! 🙂
    Thank you for your response.
    Laura Pitten

    • Sure, Laura, I think that would work. Enjoy!

  • Wait…is a 10 inch Bundt pan, a 12 CUP Bundt pan??

  • I have made this cake for about 40 years and it has always been a favorite of my sons. Now for some reason, I could not find my recipe. I am so happy to see yours and the picture. It is the same one I have had for years. Thank you!

  • Where’s the burbon?
    Can I add chocolate chips?

    • — Minna Lederberger
    • Reply
    • Yes, you can add chocolate chips if you’d like. And I do have a version of this cake that has bourbon. If you’d like the recipe, email me at jennifer@onceuponachef.com.

  • Hi Jenn – do you think this cake recipe would do well as a letter cake? I’m not sure if it will hold up to being cut into letter shapes? Example can be found here.

    https://www.fromscratchwithmaria.com/blog/how-to-make-a-letter-cake?rq=letter%20cake

    What do you think? Thanks so much.

    • Hi Kim, I think it would work without the soaking syrup.

  • I just put the cake in the oven but could I add cinnamon next time? Also, do I need the glaze? Between the cake and the glaze, it seems like a lot of sugar. Thanks so much!

    • — Nancy McCarley
    • Reply
    • Sure, Nancy – feel free to add some cinnamon if you’d like. And, yes, you really need the glaze here – it adds necessary moisture to the cake.

  • Hi, Jenn,
    I noticed deep in the reviews that you were going to publish a version of this excellent recipe with the addition of bourbon. This Kentucky-visiting-bourbon-loving Canadian would really appreciate that.
    Thanks!
    Rebecca

    • Hi Rebecca, I’m planning on it but if you’d like it sooner, feel free to email me directly at jennifer@onceuponachef.com and I’ll send it to you. 🙂

  • So delicious! Instead of a non-stick cooking spray with flour, I highly recommend buttering the pan and then adding a couple of tablespoons of sugar. Still comes out of the pan with relative ease and adds a little crisp to the crust! All in all a rousing success in my household. Amongst the best bakes yet!

  • Amazing! Never made a cake from scratch before. Perfect recipe and the step by step photos were en pointe! Huge hit with the neighbors.

  • Jenn, this cake is so good! My family loves it. It was easy enough to have my toddler help and she couldnt get enough of the cake after it was finished. I’ve read many reviews about adding bourbon or rum so I think I’ll make it again using alcohol for the adults. I’ll have to make 2 so the kiddos can eat the original recipe. 🙂 Thanks!

    • Forgot to mention I used evaporated milk, water, and lemon juice to make my buttermilk. Turned out well!

  • I have made this cake 3xs by 3 different people and hands down your cake turnt out the best! Next time my husband wants more bourbon flavor..lol

  • Can I use a 10 cup bundt cake pan instead of a 12 cup one?

    • Unfortunately not (it will overflow). Sorry!

    • I just used a 10 cup and it was fine.

  • I have fine sugar instead of granulated can I use it in this cake?

    • Unfortunately, I don’t think that will work here. Sorry!

  • Jenn, just wondering if a substitution could be made in the glaze. Could a good bourbon be used for part of the water..say 3parts water and 1 part bourbon?

    Thanks,
    Kaye

    • Definitely! Hope you enjoy. 🙂

  • Hi. Someone here mentioned that they added 1/4 c. Bourbon to the cake and 1/4 c. Bourbon to the glaze. I would like to do the same but am wondering if that would change the consistency of the chemistry of each, or, if I am going to do add the Bourbon, when should I add to eacheach and is there anything I should omit if I add it? Thanks!

    • Hi Jane, I actually have a recipe (that’s not yet on the blog) that incorporates bourbon into the batter and the glaze. Feel free to email me at jennifer@onceuponachef.com and I’ll send you the recipe.

  • Lovely cake. Since the first one left with the birthday boy, I had to make a second for my lady and me. I cut the recipe to 3/4, used a 10 cup bundt pan and baked it 45 min. Worked nicely. Tomorrow, one for a daughter. Thank you for your wonderful web site.

    • So glad your family is enjoying the cake, David! 😊

  • Oooops! Forgot to give the 5 star rating.

    • Just made this beautiful, moist, and decadent cake! The recipe was easy to follow, the batter rose and browned evenly, and the sauce only elevated it all the more! My son loves this special cake, so I’ve made it for his leaving for college-just so he knows how much I love him! Thank you for another tried and true winner!

  • I love your recipes because they are fool-proof and so very easy to follow, thanks to your narrative pictorials. This is our new household go-to cake recipe. This time I added a cup of chopped strawberries 🍓and a few teaspoons of matcha powder 🍵 for a fresh summer spin. Thanks again for sharing your culinary expertise!!🤗

  • Replying to Jenn: When I made the cake in a glass 9 x 13 pan, I cooled the cake on a rack, washed the dish , re-inserted the cake and glazed the cake on the top (the original top of the cake). Served from the dish too as it was easier to transport. I did increase the glaze by half , but really, I think sweet registers differently with folks (just read reviews on different frostings that some think are perfect and others are on sugar overload). I did not glaze the bottom of the cake because it simply never occurred to me 🙂 until I read your directions. So I made your recipe (exactly and in a bundt pan) for Father’s Day and it was light and delicious and several folks liked that the cake had glaze on the bottom. Thanks again!

    • Thanks so much for the follow-up, Ann, and glad to hear that it turned out well! 🙂

      • I have the same exact recipe but it says beat the butter and sugar for 5 minutes are Light and fluffy, then you add four eggs all at once and beat for 5 minutes then you add all the flour baking soda and powder salt at one time and you beat that for 10 minutes lastly you stir in the vanilla and you bake at 325

        • — Karen Szewczuk
        • Reply
  • I made this cake, along with many other great desserts, for a graduation party. The graduate (mind you– foodie and declared chocolate lover) LOVED this favorite butter cake, raved about it for a good two weeks, and has begged me to make 2 cakes– one cake because she “won’t be able to hold off” while the second cake “ages.” (This cake gets BETTER as the days pass. Made this cake 5 days ago? Consider yourself lucky.) Thank you Jenn for being my favorite chef, for bringing great, clear and precise recipes to your readers. We love you so much! Heading off now to make two Kentucky Butter Cakes.

    • ❤️❤️

  • I have made this exact recipe for several years and it is always a hit. As I was reading reviews, I thought I would add my experience: have baked this in a bundt pan but also in a 9 x 13 glass pan (for about 43 minutes until cake was golden) with good results. I did find that the amount of glaze was just shy of covering the entire cake so I increase the glaze by half. The major difference between this recipe and the one I use is that this recipe calls for glazing the bottom of the cake which sounds delicious. So, I guess more glaze would be needed. Perhaps Jenn could weigh in with the proper proportions. I just wanted to let readers know that the recipe does work in a glass dish.

    • Hi Ann, thanks for weighing in and letting readers know that this will work in a 9 x 13 pan. Did you invert the pan and serve the cake that way (instead of cutting into squares and serving from the dish)? I assume that must be the case if you’re talking about glazing both the top and bottom. If so, I’d suggest making about 1 1/2 times the recipe for the glaze. I think that should be sufficient. Hope that helps!

  • Excellent recipe. First time making a bundt cake and will be making again. It’s a bit more time consuming than I could handle with a newborn in the house so I’ll wait until baby is a bit older and less demanding to make it again, but I most definitely will! Next time I’ll add a touch of whiskey 😉
    Also, it freezes really well. I cut slices that I wrapped individually in foil and it thaws easily and is delicious. I used a gluten free Flour substitute that I always use for any recipe calling for flour and it worked out beautifully. I love Jenn’s recipes, you really can’t go wrong!

    • Could I bake this in a loaf pan? 🙂

      • Sure! I think two 8.5 x 4.5-in loaf pans would work. Enjoy!

  • My whole family loved this cake. Added a bit of bourbon to the glaze and it was outstanding.
    Thanks for sharing.

  • Delicious!! I added 1/4 cup 1835 Bourbon Whiskey (which has rich flavors of oak, brown sugar, vanilla, caramel and spice) to the batter and 1/4 cup to the glaze. I made a half batch and baked it for 50 minutes. Perfectly well done! Moist, heavenly, etc, etc. Bravo!

  • This cake is super easy to put together. My family absolutely loved it. I will definitely make it again.

    • — Heidi Van Stone
    • Reply
  • This recipe is perfection and so easy to make. The cake is mouthwateringly tender and the crumb is even and moist. The glaze adds the prefect donut glaze crispness.

  • I fixed the Kentucky Butter cake for my sewing group yesterday and I wish you could have heard the raves. The girls loved it. Thank you for your recipes once again. I love trying new recipes and many of yours are in my keeper file.
    Thank you,
    Dianne Wilson

  • Do I glaze it before freezing? Thank you for such an awesome resource … your site is just the best.

    • You’re so welcome, Amaris!! Yes, I’d glaze it before freezing. Just make sure that the glaze is completely dry before you wrap the cake to freeze. Hope you enjoy!

  • I made the cake yesterday and oh my! It was just as delicious as you said. Had trouble getting it out of the pan so it wasn’t as pretty as yours. Also, I omitted water in the glaze and substituted 1/4 c Bourbon. It was out of this world. Thank you Jen!

    • — Josseline Wood
    • Reply
    • Thank you Jenn!
      Sorry for misspelling your name.

      • — Josseline Wood
      • Reply
      • Have made 4 times. Perfect every time, barely lasts a day. I have failed many times at pound cake. Which I don’t like but is a favorite of my brothers, this is perfection. Satisfies all. Good riddance pound cake. Thank you.

  • It looks like the original recipe pours all of the the butter sauce over the bottom of the cake whereas your recipe pours some over the bottom of the cake and then brush the remainder on the top. Was just wondering why this is adjusted? And is the top of the cake crunchy or moist after brushing it with the butter sauce? Thank you!

    • Hi Lisa, I tried it both ways and found that the cake is more balanced — taste and texture-wise — when you glaze both the top and bottom. The glaze leaves a delicious crunchy finish once dry, and I love that on the top as well as the bottom. It looks prettier when the whole cake is glazed, too. Hope that helps!

    • Once again, you are a master chef! Everyone in my bible study group LOVES your recipes- especially the sweets. I’ve converted all my friends to your recipes which needless to say very often show up at our potluck parties, too. 😁 Thank you for sharing your gifts and talents. Question #1 : How long to bake for 1/2 a recipe? Question #2: Out of curiosity, do ever plan to release another cookbook?

      • So glad everyone is enjoying the recipes, Laurie! For a half recipe, I’d start checking around 40 to 45 minutes but you’ll have to just keep an eye on it. As for a second cookbook, I’m thinking about it but no definite plans yet. I’d love to know what kinds of recipes readers are interested in… 🙂

        • Hello, I made this cake and it was delicious! I will be making it again in mini bundlets for Father’s Day. I learned last time not to fill the cake pan to the top when cooking. Do you recommend filling pans half full or 3/4 full prior to baking?

          • Hi Megan, Glad you liked the cake. You can fill the cake pans until they’re about 3/4 full. 🙂

            • — Jenn
  • Love this cake! It’s like eating a glazed donut. You’re my go to for recipes Jenn.

  • Do you have metric weight measure. Lacking this, should I just multiply the number of cups for the flour by 120 grams. I think (at least for the King Arthur AP flour 1/4 cup is 30 grams). Thanks. I’m going to make this tomorrow. Can you freeze this?

    • Hi Beck, I just added the metric conversions, so you’re good to go there. And, yes, the cake freezes nicely. Hope you enjoy!

  • I made this Butter Cake yesterday and there’s just a little left! It’s so good! My son took a bite and said “Mom! This is amazing!” I’m definitely going to make this again. It took longer for the syrup to soak into the cake because the cake cooled down (laundry), so apply when warm for the best results.

    • This recipe is very similar to a cake my mother made for holidays. It never lasted for a second day. Thank you for sharing your recipe as most of my mother’s disappeared when moving.

  • Hi, Jenn. I love your recipes! But I always wonder what kind of salt you use in your recipes, table, kosher or sea salt? I know it can make a difference, especially in baking. Thank you!

    • — Christine Warwick
    • Reply
    • Hi Christine, Glad you like the recipes! 🙂 If my recipes just call for salt, table salt is appropriate. I will always specify if you need something other than that like sea salt or kosher salt. Hope that clarifies!

    • Hi! This cake looks amazing but I don’t have any buttermilk…I’m going to improvise…would you suggest milk mixed with a bit of lemon juice or white vinegar? Thank you Jenn for all you do to make home chefs look like pros!!!

      • Yep, that will work. See here for the ratio of milk to lemon juice. Hope you enjoy! 🙂

  • What are the high elevation (6,000′) instructions?

    • Hi Christine, I don’t have experience baking at high altitudes so, unfortunately, I don’t have any wisdom to share – I’m sorry! You may find these tips helpful though. 🙂

  • Made this cake completely gluten free with 1-1 flour and it turned out delicious!!! Just wanted to share.

    • — Samantha Lueken
    • Reply
  • I made this cake this past weekend and it is absolutely delicious. It is definitely a keeper.
    Following a reader’s suggestion I added some whiskey to the syrup. A nice flavor combined with the vanilla.
    I wanted to thank you for your website and all the delicious recipes. It is my go to.

    • — Laurent-Paul Durell
    • Reply
  • Hi Jen,
    First, this cake looks SO good, I think I may try and make it for Easter. Next, I would love to know where to find the cake plate you used for this cake in the photos. Thanks so much!

    • I wish I could help, but I don’t recall where I got that plate – so sorry!

  • Hi, this recipe looks wonderful, but I was wondering if it uses a 10 cup or 12 cup bundt pan.

    • Hi Lina, A 12-cup pan works best for this. Hope you enjoy!

  • My oh my!
    I’m not a dessert person at all, but after reading the recipe I thought I’d give it a try. The butter may have had something to do with it!
    I always read the reviews, but I like to review AFTER it’s been made.
    It was simple to make, it looked great and tasted incredibly light and soft.
    Didn’t think my young grandson would care for it since there was no icing, but he and the neighbor kids asked for thirds!
    I’ll make this again! Even I had 2 pieces!
    Thanks for this beautiful Butter Cake!
    Jeanette
    Canada

  • This recipe jogged my memory, so I went through to my recipe box and sure enough there it was. Made it often about thirty years ago and then it sort of slipped away. I remember that it was a big, satisfying, wonderful cake. The only difference was in the way it was put together, in the traditional way, creaming butter and sugar, adding eggs, etc. The glaze did have 2 tbsp of rum and it was all brushed over the bottom of the cake and cooled completely in the pan, then dusted with confectioners sugar

  • Hi Jen. Love all of your recipes!! Can I add chocolate chips to this cake? I’m looking for a great chocolate chip pound cake. Thanks!–Lisa

    • Sure, Lisa, I think that would work. You could also try this recipe.

      • Hi there Jenn
        Once again your recipes do not disappoint- I never made a cake from scratch- who knew it was so easy??? Made this for our 2nd annual Kentucky Derby gathering- this cake is delectable!
        One of my guest wanted to know if it has to be made in a bunt?

        Thank you
        Diane

        • — Diane Rahne Truhan
        • Reply
        • So glad you enjoyed it, Diane. It doesn’t need to be made in a Bundt; I think two 8.5 x 4.5-in loaf pans would work.

  • Made a similar cake with glaze in a Nordic House pan for Christmas and dusted it with icing sugar for a snow effect. It was delicious and the kiddies fought over the chimney – grin.

    I have another Nordic bundt pan with several small houses (very large muffin?) Do you think it would adapt to that?

    • I do think that would work, Andrea. Please lmk how it turns out if you try it. 🙂

  • can you omit salt and use salted butter instead?

    • Hi Irene, While it varies by brand, most salted butter has approximately 1/4 tsp. salt per stick, so you can use the salted butter and reduce the salt in the recipe as needed. Hope that helps!

  • Can this be made in two loaf pans instead of a bundt pan? Thanks

    • Sure, Elly – I think that will work. 🙂

  • Oh my goodness, no calories there then! Looks absolutely delicious – must entice some visitors over so that I have an excuse to make one.

    • I’m on my way!

  • This cake recipe looks so delicious. Thank you for sharing it. Do you think it would also work to add some cocoa to the butter/sugar glaze mixture to give it a dark chocolate glazed donut effect?

    • Hi K, While that sounds yummy, unfortunately, I don’t think it will work here — sorry!

  • Looks yummy. I wonder if the original version called for Bourbon hence the Kentucky in the name.

    • I thought the same. A little bourbon in the glaze might be nice, especially since I think it would enhance the vanilla flavoring.

      • — Josephine Varsi
      • Reply
      • That cake sounds so good. I bet a little rhum wouldnt hurt either.

        • — Josseline Wood
        • Reply

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