Bourbon-Brown Butter Pecan Pie

Tested & Perfected Recipes

Made with brown butter and bourbon, this pecan pie has a richer, more complex flavor than the typical pecan pie.

bourbon pecan pie

This is my new favorite pecan pie, and the recipe credit goes to one of my wonderful longtime readers, Jeff Winett from Sherman Oaks, California. Jeff is an avid cook and baker so when he emailed me his “never-fails-to-thrill” pecan pie recipe a few months ago, I bookmarked it for the holidays.

With Thanksgiving finally upon us, I gave it a test-run over the weekend and it did not disappoint! Made with dark brown sugar, golden syrup, brown butter, and a shot of bourbon, the pie is richer with a more complex praline flavor — and also less cloyingly sweet — than your typical pecan pie. And the good news is that it barely requires any more effort. The only extra step, and it takes just five minutes, is browning the butter until it smells nutty and fragrant. I promise — the payoff in flavor is well worth the time.

What you’ll need to make pecan pie

For the Filling

how to make pecan pie

The only ingredient you may not be familiar with is golden syrup — a thick, amber-colored sweetener with a slightly toasty, caramel-like edge. You can find it in the baking aisle of most large supermarkets near the corn syrup and molasses. The most well-known brand is Lyle’s, which is widely available in the UK (and sold at Whole Foods in the US) but King Golden Syrup is more common in the US.

For the Crust

how to bake a pecan pie

I like to make a homemade crust for my pecan pies — it’s easy once you get the hang of it — but a store-bought crust will work, too. Just be sure to buy a 9-inch deep dish crust, otherwise, you won’t have room for all of the filling. Baking powder might seem like an odd addition but it helps the crust expand into the pan, rather than shrink and slip down the sides as it bakes.

How To Make Bourbon-Brown Butter Pecan Pie

Step 1: Make the Crust

To begin, combine the flour, salt and baking powder in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade.

Add the butter and shortening in pieces. (You can use all butter if you like, but shortening helps the crust hold its shape and makes it a little easier to work with.)

Pulse until you have coarse crumbs with lots of pea and chickpea-sized clumps of butter and shortening within.

Add the water and pulse a few times until the mixture is just evenly moistened and very crumbly. It will not come together into a mass — that’s good!

Dump the crumbly dough out onto a work surface.

Gather it into a ball.

Then pat the dough into a 5-inch disc and wrap it in plastic. Refrigerate for at least 45 minutes or up to 3 days to rest.

Take the dough out of the refrigerator and dust your work surface lightly with flour. Place the dough on top and sprinkle a little flour over the dough.

Roll the dough, turning it frequently and adding more flour as necessary so it doesn’t stick, into a 13-inch circle.

Fold the dough into quarters without creasing it and transfer it to a 9-inch deep dish pie pan (the pan should be at least 1-1/2 inches deep).

Gently fit the dough into the pan, easing it inwards rather than stretching it outwards. Don’t worry if it tears, just patch it right back up.

Trim the edges to 1/2-inch beyond the lip of the pie pan, if necessary. Turn the edges under to create a rim on the crust (you can use the scraps to patch in any thin areas); then press the rim against the lip of the pan, forming it into an even edge as you go. Using your fingers, crimp the rim. Place the crust in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes while you heat the oven.

Remove the crust from the refrigerator and cover with a piece of parchment paper. Fill the crust at least halfway full with dried beans or pie weights. Bake for 20 minutes, or until the crust is pale and partially cooked. This step, called blind baking, ensures that the crust is crisp on the bottom (otherwise the wet filling will prevent the crust from cooking through). Remove the parchment and dried beans/pie weights and set aside while you prepare the filling.

Step 2: Make the Filling

In a small saucepan over medium heat, melt the butter and cook, swirling the pan occasionally, until the butter smells nutty and is golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Once you smell that nutty aroma, take the pan off the heat and pour the browned butter into a large heat-proof bowl to cool.

To the bowl with the brown butter, add the brown sugar, corn syrup, and golden syrup and whisk until smooth.

Add the eggs, bourbon, vanilla, and salt.

Whisk until smooth.

Step 3: Assemble and Bake the Pie

Sprinkle the pecans in the baked pie crust and then pour the syrup mixture over them. The nuts will float to the top. (For a prettier finished pie, use your fingers to flip over any whole pecans that are upside down, and arrange the whole pecans evenly on the surface.)

Put the pie on the baking sheet and bake until just set and bubbling at the edges, 50-55 minutes. The pie will still wobble just a bit when nudged; that’s okay – it will continue to cook as it cools. Remove the finished pie from the oven and place on a wire rack to cool completely, about 4 hours or overnight. For the neatest slices, use a serrated knife to gently saw through the pecans. Serve at room temperature with unsweetened whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.

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Bourbon-Brown Butter Pecan Pie

Made with brown butter and bourbon, this pecan pie has a richer, more complex flavor than the typical pecan pie.

Servings: 8
Prep Time: 30 Minutes
Cook Time: 1 Hour 15 Minutes
Total Time: 1 Hour 45 Minutes, plus at least 45 minutes for the dough to rest

Ingredients

For the Crust

  • 1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour, spooned into measuring cup and leveled with a knife
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon baking powder
  • 6 tablespoons very cold unsalted butter, sliced into 1/4-inch pieces
  • 3 tablespoons very cold vegetable shortening, in 3 pieces
  • 4 tablespoons very cold water

For the Filling

  • 5 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2/3 cup packed dark brown sugar
  • 2/3 cup light corn syrup
  • 1/2 cup golden syrup (such as Lyle’s or King)
  • 3 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons bourbon (optional but highly recommended)
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2-1/2 cups pecan halves (coarsely chop half of them, and leave the rest whole)
  • Unsweetened whipped cream or vanilla ice cream, for serving

Instructions

Make the Crust

  1. Combine the flour, salt and baking powder in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade. Pulse a few times to combine. Add the pieces of butter and shortening and pulse until you have coarse crumbs with lots of pea and chickpea-sized clumps of butter and shortening within. Add the water and pulse a few times until the mixture is just evenly moistened and very crumbly. It will not come together into a mass -- that's okay. Dump the crumbly dough out onto a work surface and gather it into a ball. Pat the dough into a 5-inch disc -- don't worry if the edges crack -- and wrap it in plastic. Refrigerate for at least 45 minutes or up to 3 days to rest.
  2. Take the dough out of the refrigerator (if it was in the fridge for a long time, let it sit on the countertop for 10-15 minutes so that it's malleable enough to roll). Dust your work surface lightly with flour and place the dough on top; sprinkle a little flour over the dough. Use your hands to quickly work the dough into a smooth disc -- don't overwork it or warm it up too much, just smooth the edges as best as you can so it's easier to roll. With a rolling pin, roll the dough, turning it frequently and adding more flour as necessary so it doesn't stick, into a 13-inch circle. Fold the dough into quarters without creasing it and transfer it to a 9-inch deep dish pie pan (the pan should be at least 1=1/2 inches deep). Gently fit the dough into the pan, easing it inwards rather than stretching it outwards. Don't worry if it tears, just patch it right back up. Trim the edges to 1/2-inch beyond the lip of the pie pan, if necessary. Turn the edges under to create a rim on the crust (you can use the scraps to patch in any thin areas); then press the rim against the lip of the pan, forming it into an even edge as you go. Using your fingers, crimp the rim. Place the crust in the refrigerator for 30 minutes while you heat the oven.
  3. Preheat the oven to 400°F. Remove the crust from the refrigerator and place it on a baking sheet (this makes it easy to move in and out of the oven). Cover the crust with a piece of parchment paper and fill it at least halfway full with dried beans or pie weights. Bake for 20 minutes, or until the crust is pale and partially cooked. Remove the parchment and dried beans/pie weights and set aside while you prepare the filling.
  4. Reduce the oven temperature to 350°F.

Make the Filling

  1. In a small saucepan over medium heat, melt the butter and cook, swirling the pan occasionally, until the butter smells nutty and is golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Once you smell that nutty aroma, take the pan off the heat and pour the browned butter into a large heat-proof bowl to cool. (The milk solids will darken and settle on the bottom of the saucepan. When you transfer the brown butter to the bowl, try to leave as much of this sediment in the pan as possible but don't worry about it too much.)
  2. To the bowl with the brown butter, add the brown sugar, corn syrup, and golden syrup and whisk until smooth. Whisk in the eggs, bourbon, vanilla, and salt.
  3. Sprinkle the pecans in the baked piecrust and then pour the syrup mixture over them. The nuts will float to the top. (It isn't necessary, but for a prettier finished pie, use your fingers to flip over any whole pecans that are upside down, and arrange the whole pecans evenly on the surface.)
  4. Put the pie on the baking sheet (be sure you reduced the oven temperature to 350°F!). Bake until just set and bubbling at the edges, 50-55 minutes. The pie will still wobble just a bit when nudged; that’s okay – it will continue to cook as it cools. Remove the finished pie from the oven and place on a wire rack to cool completely, about 4 hours or overnight. For the neatest slices, use a serrated knife to gently saw through the pecans. Serve at room temperature with unsweetened whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.
  5. Note: If using a store-bought crust, follow the instructions on the package for blind baking.
  6. Make Ahead: The pie can be made one day ahead of time and stored, loosely covered, at room temperature.
  7. Freezer-Friendly Instructions: To freeze the pie, after it has cooled, wrap it tightly with aluminum foil or plastic freezer wrap for up to 2 months. Thaw in the refrigerator overnight before you plan to serve it.

Nutrition Information

Powered by Edamam

  • Per serving (8 servings)
  • Calories: 731
  • Fat: 45 g
  • Saturated fat: 14 g
  • Carbohydrates: 79 g
  • Sugar: 41 g
  • Fiber: 4 g
  • Protein: 8 g
  • Sodium: 363 mg
  • Cholesterol: 112 mg

This website is written and produced for informational purposes only. I am not a certified nutritionist and the nutritional data on this site has not been evaluated or approved by a nutritionist or the Food and Drug Administration. Nutritional information is offered as a courtesy and should not be construed as a guarantee. The data is calculated through an online nutritional calculator, Edamam.com. Although I do my best to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates only. Varying factors such as product types or brands purchased, natural fluctuations in fresh produce, and the way ingredients are processed change the effective nutritional information in any given recipe. Furthermore, different online calculators provide different results depending on their own nutrition fact sources and algorithms. To obtain the most accurate nutritional information in a given recipe, you should calculate the nutritional information with the actual ingredients used in your recipe, using your preferred nutrition calculator.

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Reviews & Comments

  • Just made it today. Absolutely perfect…crust and filling. Just a note..I let it sit overnight before cutting into it.

    • — Becky Bravo on January 13, 2021
    • Reply
  • Hi! I’m in the process of making the pie and just got done making my dough. I saw that you said it should be very crumbly but mine came out to a solid ball in the processor. I follow the recipe to a “t” but am worried it may not come out right. Any recommendations on what I should do?

    • — Kelly on December 23, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Kelly, It will be fine – just proceed with the recipe. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on December 23, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi there,

    I’m in Australia where corn syrup is not a thing but golden syrup is readily available. Can I just use golden syrup as a substitute?

    Thanks! Excited to try this today

    • — Gavin on December 15, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Gavin, You can replace the corn syrup with more golden syrup – won’t make much difference. I’d love to know how it turns out!

      • — Jenn on December 16, 2020
      • Reply
      • It turned out delicious! It was a huge hit 🙂

        • — Gavin on December 25, 2020
        • Reply
  • My family loved this pie for Thanksgiving. Do you think this filling would work in your Pecan Shortbread Squares?

    • — Chris Flenner on December 10, 2020
    • Reply
    • Glad you liked this! If you want pecan squares, I’d actually recommend this recipe. Hope you enjoy if you make them!

      • — Jenn on December 10, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi! I made this pie for Thanksgiving this year and while it was delicious, it completely fell apart. Like, not runny, just was more of a pecan crumble. I didn’t have a deep dish crust so maybe the 2.5 cups of pecans was too much? There wasn’t a lot of filling – just nuts. (Which again, were delicious…it just wasn’t much of a slice of pie) Any advice?

    • — Lea on December 8, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Lea, Were you able to fill all the filling into the pie dish? If not, that would explain it as the filling to nut ratio would’ve been off.

      • — Jenn on December 8, 2020
      • Reply
  • Delicious pie AND east to make! My crust was still a little a little wet after blind baking so I took out my pie weights and parchment paper and put it back in the oven for another 5 or so until the bottom looked more cooked, came out perfect! The hint of bourbon really adds to it, don’t skip it. 🙂

    • — Charlotte on December 5, 2020
    • Reply
  • I made a practice pie before making one for Christmas. Loved the taste but my pie came out runny ): I added 1/2 teaspoon extra bourbon but didn’t think that would make that much of a difference. I put it in the oven for 55 minutes and let it cool on the counter overnight. Should I increase the bake time next time? I also wonder if the brown sugar granules didn’t melt enough in the filling when I was making it and if that would have made a difference, the filling seemed like it had sugar granules fully intact when I was pouring it into the crust.

    Any advice? I’d like to give it another try!

    Thanks!

    • — Maggie on December 2, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Maggie, sorry you had a problem with this. I suspect that the pie was just a bit underbaked. For extra insurance though, I would omit that additional bourbon so as not to add any more liquid to the filling. Hope you have better luck if you try it again!

      • — Jenn on December 2, 2020
      • Reply
  • This is a really great recipe. I have found the recipe for my future Pecan Pies (which I LOVE to eat). I put it to the test and had some local “pie experts” over and they also loved it.
    That nutty flavor of the brown butter makes the bourbon flavor pop up with delicacy, in an subtle way. Thanks!

    • — Bart Kohnhorst on November 27, 2020
    • Reply
    • Also, adding: just the right level of sweetness. I aim to make pecan pies that are not in the “cloyingly sweet – tooth hurting range”. This is another reason for loving this pie, as the sugar does not take over. Bourbon, nuts, pastry, butter…. All great flavors. I don’t comment on recipes much but wanted to express thx because — its Thanksgiving after all, and it worked out great for me.

      • — Bart Kohnhorst on November 27, 2020
      • Reply
  • This pecan pie is so good!! Couldn’t find golden syrup, but easily made some.

    • — Lauren on November 26, 2020
    • Reply
  • It takes 8 hrs to make this pie. I don’t care if it’s the best ever. It doesn’t tell you that in the beginning. Be up front.

    • — I wouldn't give a star if it would let me. This year no dessert on thanks giving cause it takes forever for thisbpie on November 26, 2020
    • Reply
    • Lol well a normal from scratch pie is a labor of love that takes a few hours to make, and then patience is a virtue before cutting into it!

      • — Gabbi Rodriguez on November 27, 2020
      • Reply
    • It does not take 8 hours. This pie is delicious—I have made it many times and actually takes less time than most pies because you don’t have to peel fruit, etc. I suggest you use a store bought crust and make it that way if you are really short on time. My pie is in the oven now after making my own crust and it took maybe 90 minutes? My husband made me a pomegranate martini so I lost track of the time. Maybe you should try that. Thanks for the great recipes, Jenn!

      • — Lynn on November 28, 2020
      • Reply
  • I only have a regular 9″ store bought frozen pie crust, not a deep dish. Should I adjust the cooking time since there won’t be as much filling in it? Thanks!!

    • — Jeff on November 26, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Jeff, Yes, it will cook faster. It’s hard to say how much, so I would just keep an eye on it.

      • — Jenn on November 26, 2020
      • Reply
      • Thank you for responding so quickly. Especially on Thanksgiving! Have a wonderful day!

        • — Jeff on November 26, 2020
        • Reply
  • I know this is very late on Thanksgiving Eve, so realize you are probably deep in your own preparations! I ran out of time to make the crust for this pie, so bought a refrigerated crust :-(.
    However, there are no instructions on the package regarding blind baking, only for a baked shell or filled pie. The instructions for a filled pie are to add the filling to the unbaked crust and bake according to recipe. Any ideas?!
    Thank you and I hope you have a very Happy Thanksgiving!
    Ruthie

    • — Ruthie Peterson on November 25, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Ruthie, Follow the directions on the package for a baked shell. Hope that helps!

      • — Jenn on November 26, 2020
      • Reply
      • Thank you for your quick help, Jenn. Everyone loved the pecan pie, said it was the best they had ever tasted. Even my daughter-in-law, who said she doesn’t like pies, had a small spoonful and then asked for a whole piece! She couldn’t wait to tell her mom that she likes pie now! Next time though, I am definitely going to leave enough time to make your pie crust as well!

        • — Ruthie Peterson on November 28, 2020
        • Reply
  • Hi Jenn, love your site and have made many of your recipes-all hits! I have a couple of concerns before I forge ahead with the pie crust. I am concerned about putting my glass pie plate into the oven from the freezer to pre-bake the pie crust. I see you picture a glass pie dish for this recipe. Can you confirm that is correct? Also, if I use dried beans for weights, do I need to discard them? Not sure if I can use them or just keep them for future pie weights. Thanks so much!

    • — Julie on November 25, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Julie, I do put the glass pan directly in the oven, as it’s in the freezer for such a short amount of time, but you can chill it in the fridge if you’re nervous about it. And I hold onto those beans for years!

      • — Jenn on November 25, 2020
      • Reply
  • Hi,
    I’d love to make this to celebrate Thanksgiving (although I live in Ireland).
    Most of your recipes have an option to convert to metric but sadly this doesn’t.
    I might try the pecan squares instead.

    By the way I have your cookbook, which I love. It’s great that you give the metric conversions.
    I’m going to suggest that you add a dictionary/translation of ingredient names for those of us who live in Europe!!
    For example, we don’t have cornstarch (cornflour), confectioner’s sugar (icing sugar), cilantro (coriander), all-purpose flour (plain flour), and more that I can’t think of.

    Keep cooking,
    Maureen

    • — Maureen O'Rourke on November 24, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Maureen, thanks for your nice words about the cookbook – so glad you like it! The pecan squares are great but if you’d like to try this pie, I’ve just added the metric conversions.

      And thanks for the suggestion about the dictionary for different ingredient terminology – I’ll have to add that to my list of content to develop! Hope you have a great holiday. 🙂

      • — Jenn on November 24, 2020
      • Reply
      • Thanks for getting back to me so quickly! I’m amazed!!
        Can I add corn syrup to the list of ingredients we don’t typically have in Ireland? I’ve checked the internet for alternatives.
        No need to explain what golden syrup is… that’s a staple 🙂
        Le gach dea ghuí (with every best wish)
        Maureen

        • — Maureen ORourke on November 25, 2020
        • Reply
  • Hi Jenn
    So this will be my first attempt to make pecan pie for my husband, he grew up having chocolate pecan pie from his grandma! Could i add chocolate chips to the pie and if so how much would you add?
    Thanks so much , everything you make is [email protected]!

    • — Melissa Pickard on November 24, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Melissa, Yes, you can definitely add chocolate chips. I’d recommend about 1/2 cup. Please LMK how it turns out!

      • — Jenn on November 24, 2020
      • Reply
  • What can I substitute for the Lyles or King Syrup?

    • — Veronica on November 23, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Veronica, I’d sub 1/4 cup light corn syrup and 1/4 cup brown sugar (in addition to the amounts already called for in the recipe). Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 23, 2020
      • Reply
  • Jenn- Could I use an aluminum pie dish and if so, how might that change the baking time? I’d like to freeze this and take it out the day before Thanksgiving. Thanks!

    • — Adrienne on November 20, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Adrienne, It’s fine to use an aluminum pie dish. As long as it’s the same size, no changes will be necessary. Enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 22, 2020
      • Reply
  • Dear Jenn
    My attempts at pecan pie have flopped three years in a row, I’m trying yours this year, any advice? Do you take yours out when it still looks uncooked sort of? This will be my last attempt. If pecan pie doesn’t work this time, then never again! And why did my mom always refrigerate hers “to set”, sometimes for up to three days before T Day? Will it really set OK just being left on counter?
    Thank you!

    • — StephDownUnder on November 18, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Steph, I hope that the fourth time is a charm with this recipe! I wouldn’t say that the pie looks undercooked when you take it out of the oven but it will still wobble a little bit when nudged. That’s OK as it will continue to cook as it cools. And not sure exactly why your mom needed to refrigerate hers without knowing what the recipe was, but it is fine to let this one sit out on the counter overnight. Hope that helps and please LMK how it turns out!

      • — Jenn on November 19, 2020
      • Reply
  • I’m excited to try out this recipe for Thanksgiving this year! This will be my first pie ever, and was wondering… Could I use whiskey instead of bourbon? We’re not big bourbon drinkers (or whiskey, for that matter), but we at least have whiskey on hand. Would it make that big of a difference?

    • — Kaia on November 13, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Kaia, Whiskey will definitely work here. Enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 13, 2020
      • Reply
  • Instead of making one big pie, can you make mini tarts with it? I have several 3 3/4 x 1 tart pans that I would like to use instead. We have a Thanksgiving potluck coming up, and doing individual desserts has always worked out better. You know you always have that one person who goes back for thirds and fourths! LOL!! Would the temperature change at all? I know the bake time would, but by how much do you think? I would place 10-12 pans on a half sheet pan. Any help and suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

    • — Cindy Fairbanks on November 2, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi Cindy, I think these would work as individual tarts. Temperature would remain the same and while the bake time will definitely be less, I haven’t made them this way so I’m not really sure how long they’ll take. I’d just keep a really close eye on them. Please LMK how they turn out!

      • — Jenn on November 2, 2020
      • Reply
  • Would it be possible to make the crust will all butter (instead of butter and shortening)?

    • — Ada on October 9, 2020
    • Reply
    • Sure — Shortening helps the crust hold its shape and makes it a little easier to work with but you can use all butter here. Enjoy!

      • — Jenn on October 9, 2020
      • Reply
  • I have made this twice now, with rave reviews both times. All my guests insisted that this is the best pecan pie they have ever tasted!

    • — Sarah on September 21, 2020
    • Reply
    • Hi, I made two of these yesterday for two events and they look amazing! I’m just a little concerned because you said it will be wobbly and mine started to crack a little at the top. I used store bough pie crust and it didn’t burn. I’m hoping I didn’t over cook them? 🤞🏻

      • — Lisa on November 6, 2020
      • Reply
      • Hi Lisa, I wouldn’t worry — even if a bit overcooked, this pie will still be wonderful.

        • — Jenn on November 6, 2020
        • Reply
  • Made this countless times. We love pecan pies and this ticks all the boxes. Thank you for sharing this amazing recipe.

    • — Nini Lau on June 28, 2020
    • Reply
  • I made this pecan pie for Thanksgiving and it was very good, but I and a few guests found it a bit too nutty. I will definitely make it again, but I think I’d reduce the pecans to 1 1/2 cups. I love pecans and always figured the more the merrier, but in this case less is more. Still a great recipe though!

    • — Ying on December 19, 2019
    • Reply
  • Made this for Thanksgiving but I added of Baker’ s chocolate (3 oz) it was a big hit. Thank you Jenn

    • — Sherie on November 29, 2019
    • Reply
  • Hi Jenn! Can I substitute dark corn syrup for light? Maybe use light brown sugar instead of dark to counteract it?
    Thanks!
    Stephanie

    • — Stephanie on November 26, 2019
    • Reply
    • I think that’d be fine, Stephanie. Enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 26, 2019
      • Reply
  • Hi Jenn,
    I want to make your pecan pie for Thanksgiving, but I cannot find golden syrup at our local store. What would you recommend that I substitute for it?
    Thanks,
    Kim

    • — Kim Craighead on November 21, 2019
    • Reply
    • Hi Kim, If you can’t find golden syrup, I’d sub 1/4 cup light corn syrup and 1/4 cup brown sugar (in addition to the amounts already called for in the recipe). Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 22, 2019
      • Reply
  • If I wanted to make these in 3 1/2 inch paper pans for individual pies With there be a temperature and time you would recommend?

    • — Jennifer on November 20, 2019
    • Reply
    • Hi Jennifer, I’ve never used pans like this, so I can’t say for sure, but I would keep the oven temp the same and start checking the pies for doneness at about 30 minutes (this is just a guesstimate, though, so keep a close eye on them). Hope you enjoy!

      • — Jenn on November 21, 2019
      • Reply
      • Hi Jenn,

        Can I make the pie a few days ahead and freeze them? If so, how would you recommend reheating it and for how long?
        Thank you
        BTW…I am using quite a few of your recipes for my Christmas dinner! Cant wait to try them 🙂

        • — Cyd on December 19, 2019
        • Reply
        • Hi Cyd, It’s perfectly fine to make the pie ahead and freeze it. Thaw it in the fridge overnight before you plan to serve it. And I would not recommend reheating it as I think that will make the pie kind of mushy and difficult to cut. Hope that helps and that you have a lovely Christmas dinner!

          • — Jenn on December 20, 2019
          • Reply
  • I have made a lot of pecan pies, but this is the BEST pecan pie ever!

    • — Barb on November 5, 2019
    • Reply
  • Love your cookbook… purchased extra copies for hostess gifts.

    I’d like to try this pie using a store bought crust. How does one add baking powder to a store bought crust (per your introductory comment)?

    What is your favorite store bought crust?

    Thanks!

    • — Shelley on October 10, 2019
    • Reply
    • Hi Shelley, so glad you like the cookbook enough to have given it to others – thanks so much for your support! ❤️
      If you’re using a store-bought crust, you won’t need the baking powder. And my favorite store-bought brand is Wholly Wholesome from Whole Foods. Hope that helps and that you enjoy the pie!

      • — Jenn on October 10, 2019
      • Reply
  • I always get compliments each time I make one of your desserts but I had to leave a review for this one in particular because they just won’t stop coming! I’m not a fan of pecan pie but the pecan pie lovers said this was delicious! I also enjoyed making it and it was so easy too (probably because I used store-bought crust :D).

    Thanks, Jenn for sharing your amazing recipes with us and making us look like professional chefs/bakers out here!

    P.S: I copped a copy of your book and can’t wait to try out the recipes!

  • I’ve made this pie several times using both store bought and homemade crust. Always delicious and my son’s favourite. The bourbon takes the flavour to a whole new level of deliciousness. Thanks for for great recipe

  • My first attempt at making pecan pie (using your recipe )was a huge hit with my family. I did have an issue with the second pie I made. It was delicious but never quite set. The filling remained runny even into next day. I follow all your recipes as closely as I can because I have such success with them. Any thoughts as to what happened? Only change I made was I used a pretty stone wear type 9” deep dish pie plate rather than the 9 1/2” glass Pyrex used in first pie. Thank you Looking forward to making many more of your recipes.

    • Hi Jennie, I think the issue was probably your ceramic pie pan — the really heavy ones heat up evenly but slowly, which can slow the baking process significantly. When using that pan, you may need to increase the cooking time to 65-70 min. Hope that helps!

      • Hi Jenn! I use Emile Henry pie plates, and am so grateful your answer to Jennie Martin is posted(above), which will help circumvent the problem she had, hopefully(my pie’s in the oven as I am writing this). I’m sorry she had had the problem, but her posing the question and your response is a blessing to those of us who use ceramic. My thanks to both you and Jennie Martin!!!

        • — Marcie Medof on November 25, 2020
        • Reply
  • This recipe is more like a novel. Too much text. Too easy to make a mistake.

    • Then you will be much happier just buying a pie. If you’re not going to try a recipe, why bother being a hater.

  • I served this pie at Thanksgiving and everyone raved about it. I will make it again soon. Thanks for a wonderful recipe.

  • I’ve made this twice and both times, at 55 min and with over browned crust and top, it was a liquid mess…

  • I made this on Thanksgiving this year (2018) for my very first pecan pie ever. I had a couple mistakes in the batter (more in how I put things in) but it still turned out beautifully. In fact, everyone who tried it on Thanksgiving said it was the best pecan pie they had ever had. I did it exactly as the recipe stated and it was a huge hit.

  • I made this last year for thanksgiving and it was amazing. I made it again this year (by popular request from my family after last year!) and the pie was a liquidy mess! I followed the recipe-but there were 3 changes from last year: I used a store bought crust this year (blind baked it), made it in southern Florida instead of nyc (too much humidity?), and I baked 2 pies at the same time this year-I let the pie set overnight, as directed-any idea what could have gone wrong?? Thanks!

    • Hi Racquel, sorry to hear you had a problem with the pies this year! It sounds like they were a bit underbaked. Usually when you double a recipe (so in this case the two pies in the same oven) the baking time will need to be increased a little. Hope that helps!

  • I made this for Thanksgiving! I’d never made pecan pie before, and was nervous it would be so sickly sweet from all the syrup and sugar in it, but it turned out amazing. My dad said it was the best pecan pie he’d ever had and is begging for me to make it for Christmas in a month! The brown butter and bourbon adds a really nice depth of flavor. I may add an extra tablespoon of bourbon when I make it again. Overall, it’s a pretty easy, straight-forward recipe with indulgent results. A little slice with some cream is heaven.

    • Hey! I made this for Thanksgiving too! I had to use maple syrup instead of golden syrup, so it was a bit runny, but everyone said they loved it. I think I’ll add more bourbon next time too! Happy Thanksgiving!

  • Hi! I know the alcohol cooks off, but am concerned my family will not like any kind of bourbon flavor. Does the flavor come through? If I opt to leave it out, do I need to replace the 2Tbs with another liquid or ingredient? Thank you!

    • Hi Katie, You don’t need to replace it but you might consider using at least 1 tablespoon, as it really does add nice flavor. It’s not really recognizable, just yummy. 🙂

      • Thank you for the quick reply! If I don’t have Bourbon, would either Whiskey or Scotch work?

        • Sure, whiskey will work.

  • Hi Jenn,
    Can I use your same pie crust recipe for both pumpkin and pecan pies?

  • I would like to make this for Thanksgiving — almost every recipe I’m using is one
    of yours! : – ) This pecan pie with bourbon & brown butter sounds amazing. Today
    I began my grocery shopping for the holiday but can’t seem to find golden syrup
    — the grocers around here don’t seem to carry it. Is it a substitute for corn syrup?
    Is there another name for it, or a particular store that sells it, or a way I can make it
    myself? I’m hoping to bake the crust ahead tomorrow & do the filling on Wednesday,
    so your guidance would be most appreciated. Many thanks!

    • Hi Toni, If you can’t find golden syrup, I’d sub 1/4 cup light corn syrup and 1/4 cup brown sugar (in addition to the amounts already called for in the recipe). Hope you enjoy!

      • Thanks so much for this! I was wondering the exact same thing, and I’m excited to try that substitution.

      • Hi Jenn. I’m an experienced home baker, love pecan pie and will be making yours this week. Fingers crossed…🙏🏻
        Fyi—My supermarket no longer carries Lyle’s, and because of Covid, didn’t want to be running around. Ordered it from Amazon and will have it today!
        Thought that might help others. 😉

        • — Marcie on November 21, 2020
        • Reply
    • Planning on making this recipe as we speak, to serve tomorrow- I was concerned that I wouldn’t be able to find or order the Golden syrup in time for Thanksgiving…I live in a small town in SE Arizona, but I am pleased to report they carry golden syrup at Fry’s (aka Kroger) in the European food section- Hope this helps!

  • This pie was AMAZING! I made golden syrup. Super easy. The flavor of this pie is so good. The trial run was gone in one night. I can’t wait to make this again for our Thanksgiving! Thanks Jen.

  • This looks delicious! I wonder if you could add chocolate chips to it to make it more like a Derby Pie?

    • Definitely!

  • I would like to make the crust ahead of time and fill it the day before Thanksgiving. Should I blind bake it now and put it in the freezer or keep it raw in the freezer and blind bake it when I am ready to fill?

    • Hi Rachel, I’d blind bake the crust when you’re ready to fill it. Enjoy!

  • I made this for our Thanksgiving and it truly amazed everyone!!

  • Hi Jenn,

    I plan on making this recipe as well as your pumpkin pie recipe for Thanksgiving this year. I know the pumpkin calls for a deep pie dish, does this recipe require the same? Thank you and looking forward to eating them both!

    Wendy

    • Hi Wendy, Yes both pies call for a deep-dish pie pan. Enjoy!

  • I have loved all of your recipes that I have made so far! My husband is wanting a chocolate pecan pie, can I just throw in some semi-sweet or dark chips to this? Will I need to reduce something else to make sure it’s not too sweet?

    • — Tiffany Rodriguez
    • Reply
    • Hi Tiffany, I do think that would work, and the bitterness of the chocolate should offset any additional sweetness so no other changes necessary. Please let me know how it turns out! 🙂

  • Excellent instructions and visual aids.

  • Love pecan pie..the bourbon was a great touch

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